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49

This sounds like that impact has bent the crankshaft, which means that the engine will either need replacing or to be rebuilt. You need to decide whether a 2 hour drive to get a quote with the waiting for repairs to be completed is worth it or just to buy a new one....


20

Check for a sheared flywheel key. It connects the flywheel to the crank shaft and it's designed to break with less force than it would take to cause permanent damage to the engine. Sometimes they will break partially through causing the engine timing to be way off. It would cause symptoms similar to what you're describing. Once you get it running again be ...


15

It will smoke badly and may indeed foul the plug(s). It will be less of a problem if you only use a SMALL amount of mix fuel in each tank, so the oil is more diluted. IMHO, IME, if you use THAT little fuel in your weed whacker, you probably should sell it and buy an electric one, either corded or rechargeable. If you don't want to do that, then you should ...


11

You say mower in the body of your question, but the title could attract people looking for answer about adding it to their cars. Your car or truck will easily consume leftover 2-stroke fuel. I typically don't do more than 1/2 gallon of 2-stroke fuel to 10 gallons in my tank. The small amount of bad gas and/or 2-stroke oil will be diluted. Your car doesn'...


9

It will be 100% completely fine. I have a 2 stroke racing off road dirtbike that requires 93 octane fuel and a 32:1 mix with racing oil. And frequently, that is the only gas can I have on hand because my other yard maintenance equipment runs on diesel. I have a push mower that I use to do small areas of my yard, where the tractor with the 60 inch deck ...


9

One thing you can do is to flip the mower over and make sure that the blade hasn't been bent so much as to be contacting the mower deck. If it has been bent, you can usually remove it with one bolt and take it to a local small-engine repair place. They'll be able to unbend a bent blade for you, or at least sell you a replacement.


7

The tool referred to is an accessory for a ratchet/socket wrench setup. It simply allows one to access fasteners that are inside deep holes. It has a female square drive on one end--this connects to the ratchet; and a male square drive on the other end--this connects to the socket. Extensions of various lengths Ratchet with Extension and Socket in place


7

This exact thing happened to me last year (Husqvarna mower, long grass, hit a pipe, clang, mower stopped, cord stuck) and it was a bent blade. Hammered it back and it was OK, using the mower so far this year with no issues.


6

Nothing is guaranteed but I think the odds of you messing up the fuel/oil mixture yourself are greater than getting a bad batch from the factory. So I would say yes, the pre-mixed fuel is a safer bet. Also if you buy pre-mixed fuel there is less risk of water/dirt getting into your gas cans. However I personally think it's not worth it. Buying pre-mixed ...


5

It doesn't take bad gas or ethanol to crud up tiny carb jets and orifices. Any gas gets old and any gas dries into varnish over time, especially that which has been mixed with two-stroke oil. Proper storage is critical. Seek out an exploded diagram or a how-to and disassemble your carb. Make note of all screw settings (count turns to fully seated) and take ...


5

There is quite the extreme possibility there has been permanent damage done. 4 cycle engines do not need oil mixed with the gas to provide lubrication, since it has oil in the crankcase. Two cycle engines have to have oil mixed in the gas to provide the lubrication needed, since there is no oil in the sump. When you used the 4 cycle gas, there was no much ...


5

Pumps function by providing sufficient pressure to overcome what's called the "static head" at a desired rate of flow. Static head is the weight of the water in the height of the pipe as it rises above the source. The higher the elevation, the higher the output head pressure from the pump must be. You can increase the head pressure of a pump a little by ...


4

Many lawnmowers use a plastic vane under the engine shroud that interacts with air moving off fins on the flywheel to work as a speed control mechanism to open and close the carburetor throttle valve in response to the engine speed changing because of loading changes. Lawnmowers often operate in very dusty environments and the linkages associated with the ...


4

Use the 10w-30. If you store the blower in a warm place then you need do nothing further. If you store the blower in a cold place (around -20°C) then you should replace the 10w-30 with 5w-30 as soon as practicable. In the meanwhile, double or triple the warm-up period before engaging any load. The first number is the viscosity as tested under cold ...


4

Unless your refrigerator is designed to be repaired, that is a drastic repair, and it's almost certainly going to be a better choice to buy a whole new one: Consumer fridges are designed to be assembled once, and never disassembled. There are probably plenty of pipes and wires that are glued in place and/or buried inside the structure, and are almost ...


4

Blue smoke means it's burning oil. This could be from you overfilling the crankcase but if it is an older engine it may have been burning a little oil before the oil was added. The key here is, was it running okay after the oil change? If the problem started afterwards it then that is the likely cause. Most small engines like that don't have an oil pump ...


3

The cubic centimeter displacement spec of the engine does not directly specify the horsepower. There are other factors such as compression ratio, spark timing and operational RPM at which the horsepower is measured. You really need to look closely at the engine name plate to see if it specifies the horsepower or contact the manufacturer for details.


3

I agree with others' comments about electric mowers. (not battery; with a cord). I had one for 15 years, and only ran over the cord twice. (not the end of the world, you buy a new cord, and try to be careful). As far as this one goes: carefully heed the advice about pulling the spark-plug wire! Then see if you can turn the blade in a complete 360 degree ...


2

As Jack said, you almost certainly did permanent damage to the motor. The piston ran without oil for a very long time and running it at full throttle was just about the worst thing you could have done. Even running the motor lean on oil or fuel mix can and will damage a piston/cylinder. Believe me, I have done it with 2-stroke dirt bikes. When you pull the ...


2

Some saw manufacturers, when starting is difficult, specifically direct the user to lock the throttle "On" to start, then depress the throttle immediately, to bring it to idle. If you do mess with the idle screw, make sure that you do not increase the idle speed such that the clutch drives the chain to move when idling. You might try "flashing" the choke a ...


2

We need to divide the problem in half. In the case of an engine we need to decide if it's not starting because of gas or spark. Too test the engine for spark your going to need an extra set of hands or some electrical tools. If you have help you can have some one hold the spark plug wire close to the spark plug while you pull the string. If electricity is ...


2

My guesses without more information would include the crankcase being overfilled with oil, a blown head gasket, or damage to the piston, rings or cylinders. I doubt that you have the generator running while it sits at an angle, which could let oil slop over into the carburetor float bowl. Although that's a possibility, too, if you have it sitting on a slope....


2

I have had trouble with small motors since they added methanol to the fuel. the methanol breaks down many of the rubber seals and then the residue gets stuck in the carburetor filter screen. A can of carburetor cleaner and a few minutes to disassemble and cleaning may bring it back to new. Fresh gas is always a plus for small single piston motors.


2

I just "refurbished" a pressure washer that had set for a while. I cleaned the carb and got it to where it would start, but it would only run with the choke on. Through some online research and trial and error, I determined that when choked, the fuel takes a different route through the carb. I had to remove the main jet and associated parts, soak them ...


2

How far apart did you disassemble the carb? Did you clean the metering valve assembly? these are usually super tiny that you need a single strand of stranded wire to get in there and clear the ball bearing or check valve parts. If you provide the model # I'll try to find the engine diagram and point it out. You also want to check the float and make sure it ...


2

It sounds like the coil goes open circuit when it gets hot. That's why you didn't get a reading when you tested it post-failure, but now you do. I would say go ahead and install the coil. 15 years is plenty of time for the manufacturer to change the design of the coil, while still being compatible.


1

depends on temperature. check your manual and it may have a chart that shows how cold it has to be to change over to 5w20 and how hot it has to be to run 10w30. if not, i would run the 10w30 synthetic if its above -10 deg celsius.


1

So, I found what it was. The plug was OK, and I laid it on the engine block and cranked the mower to verify a spark. It had a spark so I figured it was fuel. I took off the air filter cover and the 2 bolts that hold the air filter housing on the carb and removed the housing. On the float bowl of the carb there was a wire coming off and going to a jumper ...


1

Purchase some "Chem-Dip", remove the carburetor and break it down to single parts, put aside all plastic parts and soak all metal parts as per directions. Check your bowl float port , it may have debris lodged in it that is hard to see. After soaking in cleaner use compressed air, not metal probes, to remove residual cleaner and crystalized fuel. The carb ...


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