34

Those are replacement brushes for the electric motor in your drill. They are what make the electrical contact to the coil in the motor that spins, while also allowing it to spin. The rectangular part on the end will eventually wear out. It's nice of your drill manufacturer to give you a set of spares. You can swap these out either by removing a couple of ...


26

I don’t think that is a power switch. That is a safety switch that is depressed by the cabinet panels when you put everything back together. It should not work unless it is depressed. You should be good. Not sure how you got shocked though.


22

I don't know who is saying those comments or in what context they are saying, but I don't agree. If the motor is actually designed to be jumpered between 240V and 120V, then it should perform the same in either configuration. Induction motors of this type have an entirely passive rotor, so no brushes. The only windings are in the non-moving fields, so it ...


19

I'm sorry, but from the tone of your question, and the fact that you even suggest plugging this motor into a regular 15A receptacle tells me you are so far over your head your only valid option is to hire a pro to wire this. This is NOT a simple DIY job and you cannot simply ask questions to get every little detail out of an internet message board to do this ...


18

That's fine, they are nominally the same. 120v is utility supply defined by ANSI C84.1. 115v is point of use desired voltage, generally specified by NEMA. One is 120v +5/-10% tolerance, the other is 115V +/-10%. NEMA 5-15 is a standard receptacle used throughout a US home. This document says the cabinet draws 2.0 amps, should easily be used on any nearly ...


10

Okay, so I think I figured out the reason, and I learned a lot about HVAC in the process. The answer is that a ceiling fan is moving air at basically zero "static pressure." Static pressure in an HVAC context means the amount of resistance that the air has to moving. In a free environment, that's zero, or close to it, but in a tightly restricted system of ...


9

Many devices are rated for either 110 or 220. There should be a tag on the device which says this. In some appliances its done intentionally so that one model can be sold and safely used in countries which use either voltage. In other cases its simply dumb luck that the component parts can tolerate either voltage. I'm not sure if this fully answers your ...


7

Unless it came with a 20A plug (pictured below), it's designed to plug into a 15A receptacle. The 20A plug has one blade twisted 90 degrees to prevent it from being plugged into a 15A receptacle. The corresponding 20A receptacle has a slot shaped to accept a standard 15A plug or a 20A plug: This assumes that the plug on the snowthrower is factory installed ...


7

The Intermittent "sputtering" is sign of a loss of power going into the motor windings. there is pretty much only two ways this happens, A: there is a short somewhere (plug, cable or switch) or B: the contact brushes are dead. If mild shaking of the grinder added to the sputtering, I would say its the brushes. This is an easy fix, since you just need to get ...


6

Late response, but posting this for people that happen to google the problem... was probably a bad fan motor capacitor. You can find a replacement for a few bucks on amazon.


6

Use a fan control (dimmer designed specifically for fans) on the power supply to the fan. Common AC electric motors have a high low impedance on starting because velocity is 0, This draws a large initial current to get the motion started and as velocity increases impedance drops increases and the current draw decreases. A dimmer will reduce the wattage ...


6

Light dimmers are designed to drive loads that are largely resistive in nature like light bulbs. They are generally not compatible with loads that are inductive. Most, if not all, AC motors are inductive type loads. That said, whether a dimmer switch will work safely with your fan or not depends entirely upon the type of motor on the fan. There are some ...


6

With another clockwise fan from the same maker, I was able to reverse the direction by interchanging the yellow and black wires as some answers here indicated. The explanation as I understood is that the rewiring changes the winding with which the capacitor is in series and hence the starting direction is inverted. In 3-phase motors, each of the three ...


6

I thought there should be a time factor in this calculation Both watt and horsepower measure power. They are the same thing, just with different units, hence the direct conversion. You seem to be confusing power with energy. Power is an instantaneous value, while energy (e.g. joules or watt-hours) is what you use if you consume power for some time. Note ...


6

I have had 5+ batteries brought to me that show full charge to no charge but do similar or slightly less. In all of them they had been heavily discharged according to the owners. All of them had melted a solder joint connecting to the battery pack. I was able to reflow the solder and save the packs in all of the cases. 2 of them showed no charge but it was ...


5

Plugging the vacuum into a surge suppressor with EMI filtering, should prevent the vacuum from tripping the breaker. However, if the vacuum is overloading the circuit, no filter will help. When I run my vacuum sweeper / paper shredder / treadmill / etc. it trips my AFCI. Eaton’s AFCI has been designed to work with devices with motors that are within the FCC ...


5

1) American house-current power is commonly described as anything from 110VAC to 120VAC.(Similarly, the higher voltage obtained by using both phases is called everything from 220VAC to 240VAC.) I believe this is mostly a historical artifact, and appliances labelled for anything in the respective range should work with any voltage within that range. 2) ...


5

Don't do it. Plugging the fan into 220V will draw twice the current and result in 4 times the power delivered to the motor, so it will spin like crazy. There is risk of overheating, fire, fan blades dislodging and bearings overheating. In some cases the motor can be rewired for a different voltage but it takes a fair bit of experience and knowledge to do ...


5

My understanding is that I need a 1 phase(household) to three phase converter to do this. Yes. Usually these are used if you need to control the speed, torque, or another aspect of the motor. If you just need a constant 1750 RPM with a max 1HP, then you can purchase a single phase AC motor that doesn't require a converter. If you need to control the ...


5

Well it seems completely straightforward: tien li kou huo xien <--> xien xiu qi "L" t'ou tien li kou leng xien <--> xien xiu qi "N" t'ou tien tung ma t'a lan xien <--> xien xiu qi "N" t'ou tien tung ma t'a huang xien <--> xien xiu qi "A" t'ou tien tung ma t'a hei xien <--> xien xiu qi "B" t'ou and of course tien tung ma t'...


5

NEC Table 430.245 states to size 5HP motor for 28A at 230V. Add 25% for start up and the circuit should be sized for 35 amps minimum. That would be #8 copper conductors with a 40A or 45A breaker. The only way you could verify it is to check the amperage with an ammeter at start up and see if it is over 30A. That's probably is what is tripping your breaker.


5

To make these fans quieter, the fans are designed to not create as much turbulence, which means they "slip" more when the air is not moving already, i.e. when you first turn them on. In addition the Panasonic fans have a built-in damper that prevents the cold air from flowing back into the room when the fan is off, so before it can move air it must get that ...


5

You'll need to check the motor manufacturer's specification sheet for your model to be sure but generally there should not be any significant performance difference between running in at 220V vs. 110V. What does happen, however, is that since the current through the motor is going to be 2X at 110V vs. 220V, it will heat up more and that will cause the ...


5

JJM your understanding of how motor brushes work is lacking some practical experience. For less than 20$ you can probably have both running like new and gain the experience. Holding the motor at an angle may cause speed changes. Bumping the motor can get them going or kill them. I looked for AGE brushes and a video came up , easy to change , 2 screws remove ...


5

I checked the battery and it reports as fully charged and the multimeter says it is at 57.1 volts out of the supposed 58 volts, which seems fine to me Is that the voltage checked right after charging? Or did you check the voltage only after attempting to run the tool and it stopped? I don't know the exact specs for the Echo batteries, but fully-charged 57.1 ...


4

It's not going to be about brushed vs. brushless motors but the quality and grade of the parts used in the tools. Heavy duty equipment like a compressor or table saw are likely to use heavier wiring and components which can take the higher voltage, where the lighter weight tools are overheating with the voltage they weren't designed for.


4

Just because the furnace fan is rated at 3/4 or more horsepower, does not mean that it is actually running at that power level. To clarify this, consider the extreme with an electric motor with nothing connected (just a shaft sticking out) spinning at full speed: it uses almost no power: perhaps as little as 3 watts, even though its ratings plate says 700 ...


4

That looks like an Adobe P2-911 plug and it is proprietary. There's another version Adobe made (I believe it's for the 230v motors) that has a 5th round pin. The flat bladed terminal is for keying the connector so it can't be plugged in upside down. You should have a 115v cord with 2 hots - one for high speed and one for low speed, 1 neutral, and 1 ground.


4

Once you have corrected your axis of rotation it should be obvious that the idea to lengthen the "clip" will not change anything with regard to the force required to raise the flap. Actually it could make things worse if the longer clip added more weight to the whole assembly. The force needed to raise the flap is measured in some units like foot-pounds (ft-...


4

Just crappy fan design and misleading ratings (450-920 cfm with no duct at all, and terrible fall off with any normal resistance - or else it's an outright lie.) What is your actual duct arrangement (size, length, number of turns?) If the fan was running in reverse, the tissue would be blown away, not sucked up from any distance. A/C motors run on current ...


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