14

One way is by looking at the bond of the bricks. Your bricks are arranged in a running bond or stretcher bond, which is always one brick thick: To be a structural brick wall it would have to be more than one brick thick, or have multiple wythes, and you would see headers, like this: It's likely your walls are wood-framed with single-wythe brick veneer on ...


8

The frame is of wood. The brick is a cladding on the outside. It is not a veneer. A veneer is fake layer of thin brick-like parquets that are secured with a cement or glue to a backing of some kind. In other words a stone or brick veneer does not have full-sized bricks. Your house does have full-size bricks, but they are not used for structural purposes. It ...


5

the wall is 13x8 and the boards are 4x8, the simplest way is to put the 8 dimesnion of the boards on the 8 dimension of the wall. As the boards need to be nailed all round the perimeter, if you lay the boards horizontally you'll need to add blocking to catch the edges of the boards. If you stand them vertically you'll need a stud where the edges of the ...


5

Open a window and measure from the face of the brick to the inside wall. If it's 14 plus inches, that's at least two courses of brick. It will be obvious if it is; questionable if it's any less thick than that. One brick (4") and a 2x4 stud wall = ~8" Two bricks and a stud = ~12" Add 1" if it's lath and plaster; add 1/2" for drywall. Allow another 1/2" ...


3

The wall studs and sill plate should be fastened to the 2x12 joist using tie-down straps. The first picture shows the details (from woodworks.org; the second is the available strap from Simpson Strong-Tie. However, you need to consult with a structural engineer to determine the magnitude of forces the tie and the connection are to experience during an ...


3

Plywood shear clips are outdated and seldom used anymore. (Most designers can reduce the thickness of the sheathing and use T&G edges.) Plywood is structurally rated for roof and floor insulation. The code allows roof sheathing to span certain distances based on loading (psf) and span. So for sheathing spanning 30” or 48” the sheathing is acceptable if ...


2

My preferred anchors in drywall for heavier loads are the newer toggle strap types. These have a steel brace that rests inside the wall, spreading te load over about 3 inches. They also have the benefit of allowing you to remove and reinstall the bolt, which older toggles didn't allow. The toggle is installed through a hole, usually 3/8 or 1/2 inch. The ...


2

It looks like the posts are toe nailed into the beams, that's pretty common in older construction, it wouldn't pass for new construction in most locales. I couldn't say whether slapping on some fittings is the right way to make your home more structurally sound in case of an earthquake. This answer is just to point you to some of the fittings I've seen ...


2

Keep it simple. A short length of tubing (PVC pipe, square steel tubing, whatever) attached to the desk, sliding vertically up and down over a long length of smaller tubing, attached to (and stood off from) the wall above and below the travel distance.


2

Bi-fold doors use channels mounted to the underside of the door opening. Most of the load presented by these doors is taken up by the hinges, but the track serves to guide a roller at the edge of the door panel. Some shower doors are suspended by rollers, which take the entire load of the door. If one is handy, one could use a shower door track secured to ...


2

Are you trying to solve a specific problem with the structure? If so, you might indeed want to engage an engineer. If you are simply trying to add a little rigidity to your building, plywood is a good choice. It will work in either orientation, but horizontal brick pattern is most typical. Consider tying the ends (and sides) together with sheathing ...


1

The Code is clear, masonry is not to be supported by wood. Usually this is in reference to vertical loads (headers supporting brick walls, etc.) For horizontal loads there are other concerns. Bracing supports are not critical load supports. In your case, straps used to provide additional horizontal support for a brick wall could be acceptable, if you knew ...


1

This video recommends using URFP "Universal Retrofit Foundation Plate" when there is not much concrete to tie into. https://youtu.be/rfKyrFembH4 Since the shear wall will tie together #1-#5 in the question (with possible additional steel bracing between floor and framing) it becomes one unit for the UFRP to act upon: Here is an image from the ...


1

Depends on the load (weight and height above sill) acting parallel to the wall and sill plate. We’ve learned that a load on the wall will just unzip it from the sill plate as the load gets transferred along the wall without a shear anchor bolt to stop the load in the first foot or so. That is to say that a bolt installed in the first foot of the wall will ...


1

Being sure to answer question: I would use Solar Seal caulk or, if I didn't have any, clear polyurethane caulk. Your idea of installing a sheet metal cap will work, especially if it is bent downward and all the bolts are on the sides of the chimney, not the top. Don't forget to slightly bend the sheet metal upward with an X so that water will not sit on it. ...


1

I'm not an engineer, but I've built and destroyed a great many things in nearly half a century of living. Here's what I'd do. Fasten a continuous 2x6 to the wall behind the top of the shelving units. It should extend past each unit to the nearest stud, and it should be fastened to each available stud with at least two fine-thread construction screws. Secure ...


1

The claim that the previously applied straps cannot be re-used is mostly not true except for certain specific cases. In general these can be re-used as you can see they are adjustable via those slots every half inch. These may have been cut to length on the original water heater but there is no reason that they can not conform to a new water heater that is ...


1

Corrosion is a process of moisture and oxygen on the steel bolts. There is no special reason for the bolts to “rust” at the corners than any other location, unless 1) proximity to crawl space vents, 2) coincidental subsurface moisture (uphill locations) at those locations, 3) surface moisture (downspouts) introduced at those locations, 4) leaky siding joints ...


1

It probably would not sag enough to do any damage, but "probably" isn't good enough. Without a picture it's hard to figure exactly what you have from your description - I can't picture a cripple wall without a top plate. This is a typical cripple wall framing: One way to build temporary support is to build a temporary stud wall a few inches in front ...


1

If you're in a first world country, talk to your local planning commission. They should have huge amounts of data about seismic stability down to a block-by-block resolution. They will have information in a detail that is far beyond your current understanding of the field, so be prepared to learn a lot! They can tell you block by block, even property by ...


1

Attach it to any structural component you can, as close to the top as you can. That may be the horizontal bar, or around the leg, as you surmised. It may be screwing into the top shelf of a bookcase, either the topside or the bottomside of the shelf. It may be a side panel. Use screws or wrap a cable around. Always make sure you secure the strap / cable to ...


1

If IKEA is nearby just go to the customer service (returns) section of the store and ask for a couple wall anchor kits. Otherwise, there are any number of kits available to order online or pick up at a local hardware store. I prefer the kind that use a flat nylon strap. Then you don't have to align everything perfect between wall and shelf. You attach one ...


1

Go to the inside face of an external wall and knock on it. If it sounds hollow, then you (probably) have plasterboard over a timber frame, meaning the external bricks are cladding only. If it sounds solid, then you (probably) have a structural brick cavity wall. This method isn't foolproof (for example you might have a structural brick wall where somebody ...


1

No handy references, (I was taught, as grunt labor, by a licensed civil engineer and former SeaBee, but I don't know which books it might have come from to him, or if any of them are on the web) but backfilling with something like road base (crushed rock including fines so it will pack well) and tamping it very well in thin layers (if you tamp 6" of fill, ...


1

The weight is not the issue here, since it is resting on the floor. One method could be to use a few corkscrew type drywall anchors on the top and sides of the mirror with metal mirror mounting clips. You can get the anchors and clips at any hardware dept.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible