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6

You can do what you like unless local codes require otherwise. It does not have to be pretty, since it will be hidden, but two benefits of bothering to tape and mud the joint (at least crudely) are better fire performance and not making life easier for your insect friends crawling around the house. A third would be somewhat less air leakage.


1

Turns out the hole I drilled was close to a stud which wasn't letting the anchor lay flat against the wall. I sawed off the plastic front bit of the anchor, let the metal anchor fall into the wall, and put up another one but with the wings in a different orientation.


1

The edges of drywall must share the stud/joist. If they float, they'll sag, no matter how much tape and mud you put on them. Especially on ceilings where gravity will be the enemy. If you're having serious issues getting the screws into the edges of the sheets on only 1/2 the joist width, you could add a 2x4 nailer to pick up the edge of the next sheet, but ...


7

Tape goes in early. The tape is providing a paper face across the joint just as the paper face of the board does across the wallboard surface, and wants to be bonded as close to that surface as possible. So, it's generally embedded in the first coat of mud. Mud, tape, mud over tape, build up to a smooth surface. You are not spackling, you are mudding joints ...


1

The crack will show back up in short time if you just skim coat over it. Id take a utility knife and cut out the crack (v notch). When you do this the reason it cracked could reveal itself. It could be that the previous guy didn't tape properly. If that's the case fill up the cut out crack with hot mud. Tape it with all purpose mud (id use Fibafuse Tape). ...


3

That doesn't look like drywall texture to me. It looks like stippling from a heavy-nap roller. The reason you don't see it along the trim is because a brush was used there. When you paint, do the brush edging, then immediately roll over it as close as you can to the trim. This will minimize the smooth strip.


1

I'm not sure I understand the problem. That corner is beautiful compared to most. Corner bead isn't normally screwed, though, for the reason you've encountered--screws pull way to hard and cause deformation. Use drywall nails (gently) or narrow-crown staples (like for underlayment). Be sure to keep the bead above the plane of the wall. In the photo, the top ...


0

Get some cardboard drywall shims. They are sold at the big box stores and can be trimmed in either direction to fit your application. You could also try trimming off 1/4" from the whole length of the corner bead.


1

3/4" drywall is getting more common (not common just more) in my area in garages. Here is an example. I can see this being a new standard because of fire ratings. I did an apartment building a few years back and there were a few areas where I had to use this - including hvac room and elevator backing. I have never "had" to use it in ...


0

Fill electrical boxes with newspaper to protect wires and make sure mud/dust does not get all over. Estimate where your box is - the middle. Put a little mark there. Screw in drywall - not near outlet - with 3-4 screws, enough to hold it. It should not be bending hard due to the outlet not have a hole but it should be bulging a little... Stab your ...


2

Start out by sanding the seams and lumpy areas to determine if it's just a lousy taping job. If so, rip off the old tape and redo. If the drywall is droopy, you'll have to attach it to the joists with more screws. If the paper is separating from the drywall surface, you'll have to replace the drywall with some new drywall.


2

That's not exactly a quality finish - by texturing it you're just hiding a bad job. If time permits, I'd rip off the old tape and most of that plaster/mud, and re-finish this wall in the same way you've done the other new walls. That way your texturing has the same base to sit on, and more likely to age the same way as the new walls.


0

Plaster would be too brittle to be put into a board format like drywall. Plaster is applied wet over a lath or mesh to hold it up and then dries hard. Drywall is not supposed to have Sulphur in it, but as mentioned in a comment by Ed Beal, there was a lot of bad drywall sold in North America from China that did, and it is causing lots of problems all over. ...


4

Not an endorsement but there are pre-made ring shaped tape options. There is the multi-purpose where you cut to shape, or the pre-made rings sized for can light holes:


2

As others stated, shave the paper fuzzies, I usually angle the knife slightly to get a v shaped groove. I would just fill with a setting compound ie hot mud with a squared in mesh covering 90% of the round hole, or prefill with hot mud without mesh and then go over with paper tape and all purpose compound. Then it will need 2-3 additional thin coats like ...


5

First smooth out those edges and make sure they're flat. No need to cut out squares and re-plug. Then use five or six equal lengths of paper tape to tape the area. I like to butt joint the sides of the tape and not overlap it. I also wouldn't use the mesh tape because if you're not careful you'll see the mesh imprint on the finished wall. Be prepared to do a ...


0

I am not aware of any plaster-based wall board. That being said, you could look into blue board (on which, a plaster veneer is applied), if it's plaster you're looking for. Unfortunately in your case, blue board is still gypsum-based if you're working with it.


3

Personally I have always hung drywall tight when butted or on outside corners. On inside corners I tend to leave a small gap, usually less than a 1/4 inch though. I do this because framing lumber, and framing for that matter, are never 100% perfect. Measurement to inside corner i usually subtract an 1/8 inch. Also i prefer mesh tape, always use hot mud (...


0

I would have a 2x2 on either side and attach the Sheetrock to the 2x’s as long as it’s not in contact. I have limited steam experience but have enclosed the supply and return lines, I had asked the inspector on the first time I did this and he said it would be fine on that system I called it steam but it was really hot water it was 200f max. I would try to ...


1

Bearing in mind that the manufacturer probably intended this as a coat/robe/towel/purse hook and considered that 2 screws of the size that will fit through those holes, when installed into a stud or proper wall anchor, would be sufficient to hold the expected weight. i.e. find screws that will fit the holes and attach it to the wall without too much over ...


3

Classic, typical termite tunnel. Brush and scrape it away and if you don't see live termites inside, then you don't have to do anything. Follow the tunnel up from the earth and down to see if there is any damage to drywall or structural members. Be careful in probing that you don't damage a water pipe, a drain pipe, or an electrical cable.


2

looks like termite tunnel. easy to check, just break a bit and see.


1

My main goal is getting them not at a slant (caused by the 1" bottom door peg) and flush standing next to each other. Since you do not want to drill of modify them in any way then i would suggest that you make a stand for them to sit in on the floor. The stand would have a grippy rubber pad on the bottom to keep it, and the doors, from sliding on the ...


1

If it's a blister, cut it out as proposed. If it is tape that's showing due to over-sanding or lack of proper plaster thickness, apply more mud with successively wider knives until the tape is covered properly.


2

A bit wider than 7/64" (0.109375") is likely suited for a #4 (0.112") wood (or sheetmetal) screw. #3 (0.99") will definitely fit. Or just take the hook to the hardware store with you to be sure of screw size. Note that most of the force on such a hook will be down, not out - or shear, not tension.


1

To use as “real” doors, I’d use a pivot hinge. Pivot hinges are set in the top and bottom of doors, so they would not mare the face of the doors. I’d use the hinge rated for the heaviest doors. Something similar to this: https://www.betterbuildinghardware.com/products/pivot-hinge-fritsjurgens-systemone?gclid=CjwKCAiAqJn9BRB0EiwAJ1SztV-...


1

If you spray it (recommended) you're going to want to buy a large metal scraper with a handle - and you really want to make sure you're getting it wet. This could be one of those jobs easier for a pro - its not awfully expensive and just google popcorn removal - same guys take the swirly stuff down. In and out in a day for 1 large room easily.- Option 2 is ...


0

Assuming you are in some apartment building or hanging in a large cased opening using a steel plate- if you're renting, I don't encourage it- if you're committed, and you're good at drywall repair, cut ack away from both sides and use one of these


0

Always anchor a wall to your framing. Your ceiling joists are your framing. Tape and mud your corners obviously when you put the wall up. If you were building a new house, the wall would be attached i the same way, its just you have 1/2" of drywall as a sandwich.


0

Nail a piece of 3/4 tall enough to meet stair base, but use a jig saw to drop it down to 5 1/4 or whatever your base is. Cap it accordingly with 1/4 using 45's to match the custom base, and reverse 45 to do a corner for the 1/4 cap on stairs, sand it to match the shape - If you don't plan on using a cap on your baseboard, then back 45 it at the left corner ...


1

That looks very much like there had been some baseboard there that either wrapped around the wall and returned into that gap, or perhaps there was trim on the stair stringer that wrapped into that gap. I'd suggest that the easiest way would be to replace that with a new piece of baseboard that will fill the gap. Of course, this means that your new baseboard ...


1

I would cut a thin strip of drywall to fit that missing section. It will be a little awkward because it's thin and long and therefore easily breakable. Cut it from a piece that has a finished edge to help hold it together. That edge should face the door frame. Because it's so narrow the best way to fasten it in place will be with construction adhesive. You ...


0

"It sounds like you know but I have to ask. Are you positive the rectangle duct in the stud bay is your dryer vent?" This photo shows where the dryer vent is connected. I am pretty sure it's the dryer vent. It gets warm when the dryer is running. I am planning to add a quick vent connector at 3ft above the vent so that I can have a straight ...


3

Normally it's not necessary to remove drywall when adding new walls. You'd just install studs tight to the existing drywall and nail or screw through. For the ceiling, cut openings to add backing if the plate is parallel to and between joists, otherwise just fasten to the joists through the drywall. An exception might be where you lack midpoint backing and ...


4

Cut a 2" x 4" hole. Pull the wire through. Install a box eliminator. Depending on what you are trying to do, either install a blank plate and route the cable around to where it needs to go, or install a plate with an RJ45 jack and cut the cable and attach it to the jack. The worst result will be a blank plate for no apparent reason - but there are ...


2

It'd be better if you modify the duct. A dryer vent that fills up with lint is a serious fire hazard and even if you're sure you'll clean it regularly, the next homeowner may not. You can find a lot of videos on Youtube about how to work with that kind of ducting. I'm not sure if you'll need any materials; it may be possible to re-configure what you already ...


0

Air flow should not be a problem, With the old inlet sealed air pressure will ensure that it flows correctly. more worrying is that this stub will trap lint.


2

10 mm "truss" + 13 mm plasterboard (taking the high end) = 23 mm 23 mm x 2 (both sides) = 46 mm 10000 mm wide corridor - 46 mm = 964 mm Your estimate of 950mm of remaining space seems reasonable. Other than checking your math, I'm not sure what else we can tell you or what your real question is.


1

I think you probably ought to abandon the project at this point. Metal joists can be surprisingly light gauge steel. Sheet metal screws would not be strong and reliable enough for the pullout strength you need, especially holding a moving object. Toggle bolts would probably be strong enough, I don't see the bolts ripping right out of the sheet metal, but I ...


2

Sanding is going to be extremely time consuming and also very VERY messy. The best approach I've seen is to wet the material with a sprayer and then as it begins to soften, scrape it off down to the drywall. After that you will likely need to touch up the surface but I think you'll be a lot better off in a lot shorter time than with sanding.


0

Add blocking and run the sheets horizontal or vertical with a j trim bead. Fill gap with mud. Paint then caulk the tile to drywall transition


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