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In the end, we went with the cavity dowels. The most solid ones we found are called TOX Acrobat and we placed them in a distance of 20 or 30cm, depending on the expected load. For what it is worth, we asked a kitchen installation professional working in an adjacent flat and this is what he did as well; moreover, the dowels he used were less solid (he was ...


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It can be true depending on a few things. I would use a 20 min setting compound to fill all gaps/cracks/damaged areas. It will set by the time a room is done. Follow up with a tape and longer setting compound. For a DIY 20 min compound also acts as a warm up.


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Your first mudding step is taping. In this step you fill cracks and holes that require taping in the same step as applying the tape over it, and more mud over the tape. This is all one step with the same batch of mud. In this first step you are also filling the joints. I believe the real question is: Should you intentionally leave a gap, to be filled when ...


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You should also consider cement board vice drywall. Cement board is stiffer and is preferred for anywhere that can get wet. In this case doing one small area does matter but the stiffer part will help.


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You have a few options: Place the casing over the drywall and jamb as usual, and let it tilt a bit due to the 1/8in difference. When you apply the caulking to the seams, the difference will not be noticeable. The bevel joints at the jamb corners will be slightly dipped, and you can minimize the visual distraction by applying some drywall compound and ...


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Good to be proactive and catch this before the tile goes up. Obvious problems I see are that the drywall is poorly cut (can take it out and trace it to re-cut a matching piece without gaps or overcut at almost no cost so easily fixed). Any of a drywall cutout tool, a Dremel, a keyhole saw, a hacksaw blade or a drill with a side cut bit can cut the piece ...


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Like others have said you definitely need to re-enforce the trusses. You will also likely need to add additional trusses. The maximum unsupported span for drywall is 24". It's hard to tell but looking at the wall assuming the studs are on 16" spacing it looks like the trusses are spaced further apart than 24".


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No, you would need to reframe the ceiling with timbers that are continuous and rated to bear the load of a ceiling, rather than simple rafter ties. Timbers that are butted together like that are in tension - their job is to stop the roof from spreading outwards. Adding the weight of quite a significant amount of drywall underneath would make them sag ...


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If the remaining drywall is solid, then you should be able to cover this hole with mud and tape. (First, remove the loose bit of tape on the left.) But if the drywall is crumbling, then you need to remove the crumbly parts and then re-assess the situation. If the hole is much bigger, then you'll need to insert a drywall patch.


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I think this might be more of an opinion type question but I would just repair the corner and fill the small section where the paper ripped off. Fill it put a layer of tape let it dry, put a new corner in mud let dry sand and a can of texture should fix it up. If messy with the mud it may take more sanding. If you cut a section out there will be more repair ...


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I would demo the entire back splash area removing all the Sheetrock. Trying to save 10$ (about a sheet) makes no sense to me because the Sheetrock gets damaged or has residue on it. I would rip& strip the tile and Sheetrock out and then if replacing with Sheetrock use green board or if tile use backer board to replace the Sheetrock. Replacing a large ...


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If the existing furring strips are nailed in ,i would would try to add a 1 5/8" screw on at least every other joist for addition weight support


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I do this with new drywall. It holds better and is easier to mud. (as compared to doing more screws further apart)


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First of all, plaster and drywall are two very different things. Please use the correct terms. It appears from the photo that you have damaged drywall, that looks like it may have been improperly patched in the past. While you could try to fix this using drywall compound, that will be a very difficult thing to make it stick and look good over such a large ...


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The only time I seen drywall mud shrink like that is when it is put on too thick. It shrinks as a rule, and when it is that thick, the shrinkage has to show somewhere. If it is set in thin layers the shrinkage occurs in its thickness. When it is applied too thick, say maybe 1/4" or thicker, then the shrinkage occurs in both thickness and in its width. ...


2

i see no problems other than the new fan may have some tabs that fold out to install it above the drywall and with 2 layers, they may not work right. add some blocking and prepare to drill your own install holes in the metal housing of the fan........Maybe :)


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I don’t see any problem, with multiple changes I believe it is a better way to go. Even using an electric blower to move cellulose when I pulled it down there was still a mess. The others we did were overlays. In a bathroom is 1 place I suggest using hot mud or setting compound for those new to Sheetrock. Hot mud is affected less by moisture than standard ...


1

How old was the joint compound you used? This looks old. You also applied it way to thick. You need to do many thin coats and let each coat dry completely between coats. Joint compounds don't usually shrink and crack if they're new and applied right.


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My guess: The drywaller (novice) sank the screws too deep and broke the paper; yes, all of them! Their boss/inspector came by and told them it's not acceptable The drywaller had to re-screw their work Putting in a new screw close to the original screw is an easy way to make sure they hit a stud


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The joint compound you used was either not mixed properly or had already dried out to some extent before you applied it. It also looks like you exacerbated this by putting on a really thick coat. (also I see the edges and I don't see tape nor joint compound... you mud the edges of your sheet first not the middle) I personally would try to scrape as much ...


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Like others have said in comments, drywall was commonly nailed in pairs to help prevent punch-through--hammers had a tendency to crush the drywall and weaken the hold of the nail. When screws were first adopted the practice was continued until it was known that precisely set flute-head screws hold better than nail heads, or until old-timers retired away. Fun ...


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It also helps if you can put a straight edge such as a 2x4 under the drywall along the edge you want to break along. Scoring plus the straight else is usually sufficient to get a nice break without too much force.


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Step 1 Draw your line on the paper side - for normal drywall this is the white side. Step 2 Take utility knife and carefully go over line with a little pressure. After doing this you should see your line easily. Step 3 Go over same line with a decent amount of pressure. You should probably be getting about 1/8" deep. Step 4 Drywall sheets come ...


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We had or tornado swirl around our home the other night. The next day we noticed white powder on at least four of our exterior walls where it looks like the pressure from the wind pushed drywall dust out from under the baseboards onto the wood floor


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There are products such as Ronseal Damp Seal, that are almost like a gloss. You paint over the stained part with it, and when it dries you paint it with emulsions as normal. It is supposed to seal in the damp and stop it coming back through the paint. I have used the Ronseal product and it has worked well


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AFTER FIXING THE LEAK is how this starts, but at a glance, that looks worse than a bit of bleach. You probably have wet insulation that needs to be dried or replaced. You can find out for sure by cutting a small (8"x8") exploratory hole in the midst of the big stain. If by some miracle, you don't have wet insulation, you now need to establish that ...


2

The 2 studs provide excellent main support, and you can use 1/2-in plywoord or other dimensional lumber pieces like left-over "1x4" for support at the drywall transitions. Backing does not have to run the full length of the seams. In your case, if about 3/4 of the seams are backed that's fine. First screw the backing to the existing sheets, half-on,...


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After fixing the leak, you might want to try bleach. I had luck with 25 percent bleach in water. I put a sponge, saturated with the solution, in a plastic tray and pressed it up onto the ceiling. The stain returned in a few months and so I did it again...it is now gone. You could try a small test area to see if it will work. Bleach is nasty stuff. Take ...


7

Paint will not fill the depression or smooth out the transition. I recommend filling the depression with joint compound, no tape needed. It may take a few passes to fill it nicely, but with thin layers it will not take too long before you can apply additional coats of compound. You probably do not need to fill the entire depression, just feather the ...


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Based on the picture that was posted in a comment (then added to the original question). It looks like this was a poorly done patch. At some point in the past, someone had to remove a portion of the ceiling drywall. Possibly to repair a leaking pipe, to repair a water leak from outside, or some other reason. When the person (a lazy contractor, or a previous ...


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A dripping ceiling leak is an extremely severe issue. Water tends to stick to surfaces, unless there is so much water that it drips down. If there is a huge leak, it would have been obvious; puddle of water or even flooding. If it is something that can evaporate without a trace, then it's not going to drip. It is still a problem though.


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If you have a plaster ceiling and it's in good shape, not coming away from the lath anywhere, there are some screw types and techniques that could reasonably hold weight like this. I don't recommend it but it's possible and you need to experiment to find what works well in your plaster. It varies. If you do this, also follow the advice below for the FIRST ...


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Behind the plasterboard (drywall) it looks like it could be the metal of either an RSJ or a Catnic. Either could have been used to support the brickwork over the window aperature. If it's a Catnic, it'll be possible to drill through, and use self-tappers to secure the blinds. If it's an RSJ, the steel will be quite thick, and will take a long while to drill ...


1

I believe you are describing hollow wall anchors. Molly screw is a common brand name that has come to be reference for almost any hollow wall anchor. I think you have half the removal process. You need to install a screw then gently tap it with a hammer. This will straighten out the insert allowing it to come out thru a hole slightly larger than the ...


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Anything called “water resistant” I’m sure will absorb moisture over time, including cement board. A quick Google search confirmed this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cement_board#Advantages


0

Yes you'll want to scrape off the raised section. You want to probably add new screws 1" above and below any bulges as well since the movement that caused the screw pops has likely torn the paper which gives drywall all its strength. Then refinish with drywall compound before priming and painting


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