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This is almost certainly an attempt to shield the wall from woodstove heat. It is most definitely not to code. It could be made much safer by adding a metal shield 1-2" spaced from the wall anywhere the wall is less than 36" from the stove. If the outlet has to be exactly there, then good luck cutting thru what might be a stud. If it is not a stud, then mark ...


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Searched for interior soffits seems some people use it instead of bulkheads. From the picture it just looks like you have a door with a header in an exterior wall. When you say interior soffit this just means that a portion of the header is air space? As the thickness of the header is less than the thickness of the door? Typically you'd insulate the ...


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In general if your drywalled walls have been finished - means the gaps are filled and sanded then no you should not be adding extra joint compound as a DIYer. Adding more compound - especially the ready mix which is too thick and dry - is basically ruining the flat look of your walls. You should only be using it to fill divots or major flaws. There ...


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Joint compound is not primer! I'm unclear what you're asking (and maybe you're unclear what you're after). For a joint compound to be used to level the surface, essentially like bondo, sure, that's fine. It's a perfectly viable sanding filler. But to prime the surface in preparation for topcoat? No way. You wouldn't prime your car with bondo. But ...


2

Joint compound will not seal drywall, which is what the likes of PVA primer does. It's essentially as porous and absorbent as the drywall itself, meaning you'll need two coats of paint instead of one. If you need to level imperfections or get a Level 5 finish, sure. It's not a substitute for primer. Purpose-formulated primer is quite cheap and will be much ...


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Yes, it's fine to use a skim coat as a paint base, and it reduces the contrast between white dry compound and gray paper under the paint, as well as removing any difference in how the paint takes on compound .vs. paper.


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Use a reciprocating saw to cut the fasteners holding one of the sill/fire-block boards in place. Run the blade right through the drywall; making a slot, right where the two boards meet. The top board would be the ideal choice, as it can't fall inside the wall, when the fasteners are cut, that hold it in place. If a cripple stud is in the center, trim one of ...


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Sheet goods are best saved by reusing cuts and some builders are really good at that. Well, others are not. Fact is that everyone in this business pays and bills for square feet/meters no matter if the size fits some exact number of sheet material, or not.


19

Drywall/subfloor has to be staggered. So boom you can't make a room that fixes that. Also drywall has depth meaning is your room going to be 12 feet or 12 feet and 1 inch? I have a 5'3" drywall wizard that does a 1000 square feet (including ceiling with lights) in a day easy. He uses a knife and a string and every once in a while a straight edge ...


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If your objective is to optimize the product you receive (the completed house) vs the cost you pay for it by sizing to use full sheets of material -- forget it. The cost of all materials combined doesn't strongly dominate the cost of the project; they'll often sum to around half of the project cost. The panelized materials such as plywood or OSB sheathing, ...


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Lee Sam offers good advice, but to answer the question as it was asked... You need to insulate (and apply vapor barrier, if appropriate) behind where the closet wall will intersect the energy walls. This isn't usually a problem even after the closet is built, but analyze whether you'll completely obstruct access to any cavity by building the closet. Deal ...


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As already mentioned, I would use a piece of Sheetrock to fill in. I would add a couple of points: You'll want to use mesh tape on this. Plaster is portland cement based, meaning it likes to absorb water. The mesh tape will hold up better compared to paper tape here. I'd also look for the rot-resistant sheetrock for the same reason. Secure or remove the ...


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I would do #1 as well but search for video's on how to tape and bed. Not sure if there is a reason to use plaster in your area or not but we use drywall mud. It is easier to sand and work with. You cannot just fill the void in the joints because they will crack and you will be chasing and fixing cracks the rest of your life or until to rip it out and tape ...


1

I recently had a bunch of plaster repairs done and I would go with option 1 with the following tweaks: Use the 'blue board' drywall. I believe this is commonly used in your area. Make sure to leave the boards a little shy of the finished surface: not flush. Level the wall with something good for plaster repair like Durabond 90. Using the mud to create the ...


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I don't understand option 2, but option 1 is exactly what I'd do. A few suggestions: Be sure that the thickness of your drywall brings it to flush or slightly below. Do not install patches that protrude above the wall surface. This will be difficult to tape without leaving a bulge. If you end up with a depression after installing the patches, pre-fill ...


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If what you need to do is 'increase the height of the hole by a quarter inch', then the safest solution is to get a replacement medicine cabinet that will fit in the existing hole. If that's not possible, then use a saw to remove the stud that's in the way. After that, you'll need to repair the inevitable drywall damage that'll be left by the saw. This will ...


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When you add the wallboard to the larger portion of the wall to the opening of the door, stopping all drywall at the door opening, the short portion you have the measuring tape on could take a jamb extension. Which is a piece of wood or MDF cut to fit the space out to the new face of the drywall and that will be trimmed with the same door casing as the ...


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A hobby room is considered a “living space” and a “habitable room” on this side of the pond and probably on your side of the pond too, because the code is written by the International Code Council (ICC). (See ICC R202 Definitions) Likewise, Garages are to be separated from single family residences by 1/2” gypsum board on garage side ONLY, provided the ...


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Your code may be different but on this side of the pond the thinner lumber would be ok as it is not a load bearing wall. A hobby room also is not a living space so it may not require fire resistant wall board. I would check with the local building code enforcement to make sure I was doing it to code.


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Yes, add a batten to support any free edges. Then plan the panel layout to maximize the use of panels ie have the fewest joints possible and the shortest total length of joints.


4

When you "strip" a drywall hole, most likely had too much weight with either A regular screw without an anchor A cheap plastic "split" anchor A toggle bolt (the gold standard in anchors) can work around the problems created by both by Widening the hole Straddling the hole Does the wood glue and toothpick method work here? No. Wood glue is designed to ...


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If there is space between the drywall and you are prepared to make a larger hole in both the drywall and the item you are fixing to it you could use a spring toggle in conjunction with a penny washer.


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Depending on how much damage the stripping has done, you may be able to repair the hole with a plastic wall plug, and then screw into that. Alternatively, drill a large enough hole through the panel+drywall to insert a spring toggle wall anchor.


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Drywall without anchors has very little holding power. There really isn't a method to repair stripped holes in it either. You could insert a toothpick in the hole and hold it in place while you screw in the screw and the screw would hold but not with any power. You could also use a larger screw which would cut into new drywall. None of these will give you ...


2

There's really no change to your process here. I prefer to tape the butt joints so I can then skim out the bead without interference. This would be true whether the butt joint was near the bead or not. I don't think of taping in terms of "coats". You have a series of steps that leads to an outcome--specifically a flat surface. This isn't paint, and the ...


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Other than the first coat being forced into the joints, this is not two separate operations. You're going to be looking for one joint from the corner bead to the feather-edge of the butt-joint. As for number of coats, as many as it takes, remembering not to waste time fussing over them - get mud on, let dry, sand or scrape for high spots, more mud for low ...


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