New answers tagged

0

Agree, you should always avoid flush connections between differing materials. You need the smallest flat D shaped trim which looks good to your eye. Pin it into the stair stringer only (not both sides of the gap as that can split the trim in time) and treat/finish it as if it is part of the stairs. Oh and paint the wall before you fit the trim so you don't ...


1

As mentioned in the comments, trim/molding is probably the best solution for this. It will allow some movement and you could use the same species of wood and same stain as the stairs. This will be resistant to cracking, but will not create an equal surface. In order to get an equal surface, I have had some success using paintable caulking. This won't work ...


7

Those are just flakes of drywall compound. They are inert and not flammable. That quantity presents no problem at all. In the course of working in the boxes, you can clean them out, but I'd never deliberately open a box just to clean it.


8

This has nothing to do with laziness. It has to do with efficiency of the process, which often looks like this: Framing carpenters or masons put up the walls Electricians "rough in" the conduit, boxes, and wiring Drywall hangers put up the sheets and tapers and painters finish the walls Flooring installers do their thing Electricians come back and ...


0

I've done this texture before and you can use several options n swirl it into the walls..putty knife..can use a sponge, a rag but l find putty knife is smoother. Once you apply it you use the swirling motion..let it dry n prime and paint..love this texture!


2

The ones you have do fold though they don't seem to want to. The center of the lower pieces are pushed upward while pushing the upper pieces down to form a slimmer post to insert in the gypsum board and the accompanying screw twists into the lower piece's hole tightly while moving the four pieces back to against the inside of the wall board. But, I agree ...


5

Throw them away. These are terrible anchors. There are better ones for every type of wall. I never use the hardware that comes with anything to attach to walls. Learn how the walls of your home are built and find great anchors and screws that you learn to use well and can rely on. For drywall with wood studs (per your comment) and for light to medium ...


3

That's most likely a stiff brush applied to the wet compound. Go to the dollar store and get a cheap plastic whisk broom. Practice your strokes on a piece of scrap with a scratch coat applied.


1

Looks like it's nailed to the wall with finish nails in the supports. The shelves themselves are probably nailed to the supports with finish nails, and may have some nails that are angled into the sheetrock too. I would bet that it's got some kind of caulking or adhesive in there as well. I'd take a sharp knife and score around the entire thing, all the ...


3

Don't build a better mouse trap Using super glue to repair a command strip to hang a curtain rod to hang a curtain in a temporary fashion in an rented apartment reminds me of using a trailer hitch, a gas generator, a broken window and a lot of duct tape to install an air conditioner in a car. What you want is to find an elegant solution to your actual need. ...


2

Using glue would miss the entire point of using Command hooks. The point of 3M Command hooks is that when you remove them, they come off clean IF a careful person carefully follows the instructions, and if they weren't exposed to too much UV light. Using super-glue or any kind of glue will completely defeat the purpose of coming off clean later. There is ...


2

Even in a rental, it's usually okay to use screws to properly hang a curtain rod holder. You can always patch the holes if you need to leave and take the rods with you. Glue is not advised... even if you don't have kids or cats, your friends might and when they come over - they might pull on the curtains. You might want to consider installing inside-mount ...


2

IMO I think you are asking too much of any adhesive to hold curtain rods. Though if you must, I'd go with something OTHER than crazy glue. Gorilla glue comes to mind. Reason being, crazy glue works great if the two surfaces are PERFECTLY FLAT, like gluing a couple pieces of glass together for example. There has to be nearly zero air gap. In your situation, ...


4

The easiest answer to this is a new, bigger drywall anchor - but these usually require new, bigger screws (thicker shaft, and likely a larger head). At some point, this approach becomes a bad idea, the screws can get too big and the anchors ripping the wall too much. There are various different types of anchors, similar to the one you linked. Consider any of ...


1

It all comes down to the top channel. 5 meters is a long span for sheet metal. If there's no other stiffening cap or anything involved, I'd expect it to be a bit sproingy. (That's a word.) You'll need something very stiff at the top, or you'll need a center post (or two) of some sort. It really has nothing to do with the cement board, though. The movement ...


2

I'm guessing that this is a shear wall, or that the wall wasn't originally finished with drywall and required at least some diagonal bracing because it's load-bearing. For that reason I wouldn't completely strip it, but you should be fine doing as you are and removing the bottom 16" or whatever. You may be required (or wise) to float blocking behind ...


1

That looks like a "bagged" finish. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fPRLo_7OFA just applied in a pattern instead of over the whole surface.


0

How high off the floor is that seam? If above the heavy "splash level" (maybe 4ft) you're likely ok without tape. Otherwise, are you willing to cut a bit higher? You could also chisel out a groove between drywall and tile, perhaps even just 1/8in thick and reaching up only 1/2in behind the tile, so that you can insert flat flashing behind the grout ...


2

I'll pick USG Ultralight Sheetrock, since it's probably the lightest on the market. Their specs say 1.25lbs per square foot. If you hang 4.5' x 12' sheets (pretty standard), that's 67.5 lbs per sheet. Probably 70-ish after fasteners, tape, mud, etc. In all honesty, if your ceiling joists can't handle that weight, I'd say you have much larger issues. Your ...


2

That appears to be where the joint was drywall taped and filled with drywall joint compound. Moisture or movement could cause this to happen. Is the home air conditioned. To repair it you need to clean out the original joint, tape it and fill with drywall joint compound and sand it smooth. This is a very messy process. I went through that many years ago, ...


0

That issue is cosmetic not structural. It was either a bad tape job or moisture/humidity are affecting the joints in your ceiling's drywall. The main reason it's so noticeable is because of the adjacent ceiling lights. If the light source was a floor lamp or mirror vanity lights then it would be less noticeable. Unless you can guarantee perfect humidity ...


1

The other answers are more or less right but missing some important details. You do not want exposed cement board to extend out. The goal should be for the tile - even 1" - to lap over the drywall next to the cement board. Remember you don't need cement board outside your doors and things like that. What if you have to have "exposed" ...


1

You can finish cement board just like drywall. It's a little more difficult due to the rough texture, but a couple skim coats and you're all set. Keep in mind that the use of regular drywall mud over cement board would defeat the purpose of using cement board for those locations. Use setting-type joint compound where you expect regular moisture. That said, I'...


1

You do not need to protect the entire bathroom with cement board, no. However, the cement board and tile should extend past the tub/shower at least a little bit so that drywall isn't the first victim of excess water splashing out. Per: https://www.homerepairtutor.com/cement-board-installation-part-1/ https://www.familyhandyman.com/project/cement-board-...


1

You can skimcoat it with drywall compound (mud) and then paint. You can also just paint it but it will look very different from paint on drywall.


0

your furring should be level enough that the edges do align perfectly, but even then you still need backing you can use wood or you can glue drywall strips to the back.


-4

My finial argument for not reusing them: the thread is filled up with old cemented drywall dust. If I reuse them I would either have to remove that dust or take the risk to have the screw entering the drywall sheet with the first half of the thread clean an then next one comes after and it levels the thread created by the first half (from practical and ...


3

Yep, just float a backer of some sort. Anything that will hold a screw will do. Between the various adjacent tape joints and the rigidity of the drywall it'll finish just fine. This should be the exception, not the rule, of course. You probably wouldn't want to float the edges of all sheets across an entire ceiling. One caveat: If you're floating an entire ...


-1

The only way I know to correct this problem is to remove some of the drywall and replace it correctly. Do it right the first time and you will not experience this problem. Furring strips are supposed to be set at 16" centers so this will not happen. I know of no other way to fix this problem. After adding the link and picture that shows the backer board,...


3

Dropped ceilings like you've described are a routine thing in commercial construction. I haven't done commercial construction, but I do have a habit (hobby?) of noting whatever details I can observe when I'm in a building.. Do a web search for "suspended drywall ceiling" or "drywall suspension system". You'll find tee and hat-shaped steel ...


2

Could you imagine if your reclaimed screws failed in the near future after you've finished your project? You will forever curse your own name. Get a box of new screws; they cost like $.02/screw if you get a 5 pound box or $.008/screw in a 25 pound bucket. This way if there is a failure then at least you won't blame yourself. In all honesty you're probably ...


2

I reject both of your ideas as being way too lumber-intensive, particularly in this time of global price inflation. They're also too much work and too complicated. You should be suspending single joists (2x4 or 2x2), not building walls or trusses. Those are for load-bearing situations. A top plate in such a case does nothing for you. Don't build anything--...


19

If you are going to reuse them for drywall there is no issue, unless the heads are starting to strip. You have to think about the amount of screws you put in a sheet... old screws are not a problem. For anything else, I would just say no because they suck at handling shear forces and if you have reused and reused drywall screws before you know that they ...


10

Reuse them for hanging drywall? So long as they're not rusted and the heads aren't stripped, sure, why the heck not? Reuse them for general construction work? Eh, no, not so much. They're really not designed for high shear loads in construction, so they're not recommended for that. However, I screwed together a storage rack many years ago using (new) drywall ...


-1

I say no to reuse. I've found they when they've been overtightened they are much closer to their "snapping" point so that on subsequent re-tightenings, they are more like to break off. One never knows if they've been over-tightnened so why take the chance. For repair jobs where looks and rework don't matter, then reuse makes more sense.


0

Since the drywall is probably 1/2 and the worst drop is around 1/4 I'd just shave the back of drywall off until it is flat as is needed in the problem areas. You could also consider just floating the drywall surface so it all blends in instead of trying to adjust anything from the inside. If you really want to adjust the hangers then you could do 1 at a time....


1

Although not optimal I would be comfortable if the joists were in the same position in relation to the beam but were attached with a bracket like this on each side. I would be confident since 44 years has elapsed and there is no evidence that the joist has dropped from proper elevation. Guess what? The OP has this situation. The bottom of his joist ...


6

I agree that the only issue here is an aesthetic one. If the joists were going to settle, they would have. I'd take a BFH (big freaking hammer) and smash the descending hangers up tight, then replace the drywall. I'd cut a slightly oversized patch, trace it on the ceiling, then cut that out. Presto. Perfect fit. The only place you really should float backing ...


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