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2

But I can't imagine somebody putting up gypsum and then plastering over it! There is a wall finish type called "Plaster Veneer" which is just this. My house (in New England) is done this way. The walls are typically roughed with a gypsum board with a moisture absorbent paper, (sometimes called blueboard) then skim coated with about an 1/8 inch of veneer ...


1

I've ran into this now twice on two different remodels. One was a 1960's era basement bathroom and I thought it was totally strange the first time finding it. Then I just ran into it again at my daughter's 1940's built house when we remodeled their Kitchen, Dining and Master Bedroom Closet. Each was 16"x 1/4ish rock lath on the studs and then about 1/2" of ...


1

I won't even try to compete with the excellent advice already given, which I entirely agree with.. except that I don't like mesh; I find it difficult to make mesh stay bedded in the mud in corners or uneven joints. But I'm merely an advanced novice in this specialty. Start work in a closet or other place that will be poorly lit when the job is done. You'll ...


3

I agree with Jimmy Fix-It's answer and would elaborate on a couple issues. Go with the pre-mix compound, otherwise you'll also be buying a mixing attachment for your heavy-duty drill and experimenting on the consistency. If you were planning on changing to a career in drywall that would be different but as a DIY who may do occasional hanging/taping jobs ...


6

Paper tape or mesh tape? It comes down to preference. As a "beginner" (but not for long... haha) I feel that mesh tape will be easier for you. No, you do not have to use any special mud; premix will work just fine. Some say that paper tape is stronger; some say that it is less likely to form hairline joint cracks over time. Pre-mixed vs setting-type ...


1

No one can tell you for sure since there are many varieties and sizes of drywall anchors. I suggest you get some anchors which have screws roughly the same diameter as your shelf screws. Then try them out in some inconspicuous spot on your wall. See if the anchors are holding firmly in the wall. You could even try mounting the shelf and testing it. ...


1

I would 99+% guarantee it is urethane foam . One of the raw material components is cyanide if you want to worry.


0

Use 1/4-20 “Snap” toggles in the sheetrock. They hold 265 lbs. EACH in 1/2” Sheetrock. -Jef


4

You need a flush mount cover for that box What your electrician did was install a standard NEMA 1 (indoor) enclosure/pull box there, and these by and large come by default set up to be surface mounted with their back to a wall, for use in industrial applications and utility spaces. However, for a finished application, you need to fit a flush mount cover of ...


2

While JACKs suggestion disguises the box well and removes the need for drywall work, it also is a potential code violation and makes it so someone in the future might not even know the box is there (it will look like a return air vent for an hvac system). That said, they make code-friendly covers called "Access Panels" explicitly for this purpose--you can ...


1

The problem is that it's a textured ceiling and that would be hard to match if you cut back to the joists. You probably won't need to remove the lid to this box very often but it does have to be accessible. Have you thought about just attaching a 14"x 14" or 16"x 16" register over the box? It would make it less of an eye sore but still be accessible. Maybe ...


0

Could the crack cause damage below on a lower floor? Absolutely most tile is inside the pan but the backer whatever was used is outside so if the water gets past the grout it can run down. I would say that little bubble looks like a bad tape job because there are no watermarks I can see. As far as that is concerned I would use a t pin or hat pin and pole ...


1

Depends on the weight of the TV and the type of mount. A lag bolt with similar inside diameter would have higher wood holding retention, but might not fit through the hardware on the TV, as the screw threads are typically much wider. I would not drive these directly into a wooden stud. The screw thread is too fine, and the outer half inch would only be ...


7

I agree with unhandledexcepsean--I would use lag bolts for larger TVs. Some flat screens will be fine with the wood screws through the drywall into the stud not using the plastic expanding anchor. I have seen some smaller mounts where 4 of the plastic anchors into drywall are supposed to work but I do not like those at all. Since you have at least 1 stud, ...


-1

No that crack cannot cause the shower to leak. There is a waterproof layer somewhere behind the tiles if that has holes that would cause a leak. the the mark on the drywall does not look typical of water damage, it looks more like a failed join. could be structural, could just be a bad mudslinger.


1

I have had this issue before, usually I didn't prime the corner area well enough, and the drywall tape ends up being pulled up a bit, just the top layer, when im pulling off the blue painters tape. Best fix is to sand the area, apply some joint compound, let dry for a day or two, sand to feather it in, repeat as necessary. Then prime and paint to match. ...


0

There is likely a beam and additional framing over the door providing load support for the upper portion of wall and roof. You should be able to screw or nail into wood with no need for fancy anchors here.


0

I see you used something similar to this Wall anchor link to Google Images Except it looks like you were trying to do it by hand, that's rough... you definitely need a power tool for both the anchor and the screw that would go in the center. You dont need to have anything behind the drywall for it to attach to, they were designed to make an empty drywall ...


0

Technique I've used with this type of anchor: Put a #3 phillips bit into my drill. Drill at the location I want. Stop when the screw is just flush with the surface. Swap bits for a #2 robertson. Throw way the slot screw that comes with the anchor, and use a robertson of equal or shorter length. If you are in the part of the world where robertson screws ...


1

The Toggler SnapScru product you used is decent, with two cautions: 1, you need to maintain solid pressure while driving it in. Doing this with a screwdriver is somewhere between tough and really hard -- you want to use a drill or an impact. 2. If you hit something solid, you'll just chew up the drywall. If you did hit something solid, (and you know it's ...


0

Do not Drylok the floor using the original or extreme waterproofer - it will fail, it's not durable enough for floors. You can use Drylok Clear (might have been renamed Drylok Floor and Walls, or else that's just a similar product by Drylok that my store changed to recently) for the floors, or a penetrating concrete sealer such as RadonSeal. Don't use ...


2

My preferred choice is to hang and finish the drywall, clean the hell out of the area top to bottom, prime and paint both coats of finish on the walls. Then after everything else is done, go through and touch up any problem areas with the paint. If the area gets carpeted I like to let the carpet go in before the last coat of paint. The number of touch ...


1

If you're going to use trim on the door frame it doesn't much matter the order you do it. Before - You can paint the opening freely without the frame in the way After - The trim will cover any paint gotten on the frame facing into the room The exception here might be an exterior door. You'll almost always install these before you drywall, let alone paint. ...


5

On commercial jobs with steel door frames and steel studs, you install the door frames when framing the walls. Then you hang drywall, tape, paint, then hang doors. On residential jobs with pre-hung doors and wood studs, you frame walls, hang drywall, tape, paint walls then install door frames with pre-hung doors, then install the rest of the millwork.


11

There's a huge amount of mess and potential for damage during the hanging, taping, and painting stages. You wouldn't want some of your most expensive and vulnerable woodwork hanging around through that. Also, the hangers will likely use rotary cutters to zip around door openings. You make that much harder for them if even bare jambs are in place (and again ...


9

Always seen hanging doors as one of the “final fix” jobs so they don’t get hit by stuff being carried around. Also means the doorways are wider and less obstructed...


1

If this is a heating duct, place a piece of sheet metal on the other side of the drywall and use a self-drilling screw to reattach the cover. If this is just a cover over a ventilation hole to the next floor (somewhat common in older buildings), you can safely use a piece of wood instead.


1

You can get mirror brackets/clips intended specifically for this use. Here are two examples: (of course, you need to get ones in a matching color and texture or color them yourself etc.) As for placing them, you have multiple options: One bracket at the center of each of the four sides of the mirror (top, bottom, left, right) Two brackets at 1/5 and 4/5 ...


1

The fact that the water drained out is good news. This means there isn't a large volume trapped in a stud bay. I would dump some silica beads in there to absorb moisture and keep the fan running. If you get it dried out fairly soon you won't have mold (or much mold), and there won't be a need to demolish the walls. Leaks occur in homes all the time, and ...


1

Chances are very good that the inside of the wall is just "regular sheetrock", and that will have gotten very wet. That fan setup is pretty cool and should dry it out since you were smart enough to cut a hole in the ceiling. Mold grows in areas that get wet and take a long time to dry. If you can quickly and completely dry out a surface, it should be fine....


0

I believe a more durable, water-resistant material is used for shower/tub/bathroom walls. (See Cement board.) You should definitely consider a replacement of the walls, and a full drying of the intra-wall space, especially depending on where you are. Using US-based locations, Florida and other humid locations may have serious potential for liquid-based ...


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