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You could try lye (sodium hydroxide). Lye is drain cleaner. Spackle is gypsum (calcium sulfate) and glue. Lye will definitely dissolve glue and that might break up the gympsum enough to flush it down. I was not sure about calcium sulfate - it is pretty unreactive. I am still not sure but I found a patent for clearing gypsum deposits off mining equipment ...


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Preparing this surface for tile should have been done while the cabinets were out, and honestly, should still be done with the cabinets out. It would take much longer, possibly damaging the new cabinets/counter top, and most definitely look awful, to do with them in place. If you later change your mind about the tile, it's still a nice painted wall, where ...


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There's a good chance the clog is in the trap right under the sink. Someone should try to remove it and clean it out. If it's not the trap, get a cheap drain snake and run it down the drain with the trap off. I'm not sure any of the drain cleaners would work on spackle. Good luck.


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There is nothing wrong with installing drywall on the rafters. You mentioned it's pretty dusty up there, keep in mind the that dust is coming from the soffit vents and will continue to do so after the drywall is installed. You don't want to block off the soffit vents. Not sure where you live but if it's in a hot climate, do yourself a favor and wait until ...


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An untaped (unsupported) joint is an opportunity for more flex than you want in a tiled wall. I'd definitely try to bond the new and old drywall as well as possible. Unfortunately the best time to replace the drywall was while the cabinets were out, when you could have cut the drywall up above the lower cabinet line and buried it. Now, I'd probably either ...


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The stuff I use is made with Portland cement, so the best repair is with mortar and fiberglass mesh. The repair is much like drywall just different materials. If outside do not use joint compound that will fail in the winter.


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It is exactly the same. I am guessing you are referencing the drywall that is installed in your garage. This is regular drywall - probably 3/4". If it is a large dent you may need to cut out a rectangle to the studs and new piece. If it is small just some joint compound and smoothing. A general tip for garages is that you prime them thoroughly, ...


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If your working some large areas or going over taped seams then your choice should be the mud. It goes on smooth and is very easy to sand. Spackle is great for small holes but not really good for this much work. As far as how many times do you need to apply the mud that depends on what you're trying to fix. If you're covering a new taped seam then plan on ...


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Here's what I would do Fill the holes with vinyl spackle. Mud is too loose for that kind of job. Sand the ceiling as flat as possible Use a white ceiling paint and paint the ceiling. If it's an old ceiling, it might be worth priming first (I didn't on my old ceiling and wasted paint) Should look good if you do all that.


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First, rookies should not use rapid setting compounds. Next it looks way two dry, if it is hot a quick set will not provide you enough time as it will set even faster, always use cold water never warm or hot. Fast set is also harder to sand, I would suggest sanding that down and using ether joint compound or topping mud. I can’t tell if you are trying to ...


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What are you mudding? It looks like cement board it doesn't look like drywall or green back. The cracking is from too much humidity. Place some industrial fans around to circulate the air. Your inside corners are slightly too thick but shouldn't be an issue to cause the cracking. This is coming from a drywaller that has seen some disastrous DIY home owner ...


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At one time or another I've seen every type of drywall fail when it's used in a shower. Either because the grout cracked and went undetected, the soap dish leaked or water got behind the faucets. I'm a big fan of the concrete backer board. It's available in different thicknesses and many brands can be cut with a regular utility knife. Good luck


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Thank You isherwood. I've made the following decisions: Around the sides of the corner, I removed an extra inch of wallboard so that I can now affix a more sturdy 2" section. For the face of the archway (the section that walk through), I have purchased 1/4" drywall which opens the space as I need. Around this 1/4" section, I will use two plastic corner ...


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Fire-resistant drywall (known as Type X here in the USA) is not water-resistant, so I don't recommend it in a bathroom - unless you "layer" the drywall. Install the red fire-resistant drywall against the studs, and then install a layer of the green drywall on top of the fire-resistant sheets. This will provide both fire- and water-resistance.


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Do you mean purple rather than red drywall? I see that you are from Spain, so I don't know if this answer will apply in your country - but here in the USA, the difference is that green drywall is moisture-resistant, but it is not waterproof. Purple drywall has superior moisture- and mold-resistant characteristics that make it much more suitable for use ...


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I think I'd get a sheet of 3/8" drywall. It's somewhat rare, but available. If your patches need to be 3/4" thick, this will do well and will leave you with a slightly larger arch opening than you started with. Finish removing the old drywall or plaster to the height of the arch, first. You don't want to have to try and blend with something right at eye ...


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I find batt insulation easy to pull out and re-install. Drilling near existing fiberglass (guessing that is what you have) can lead to strands getting caught in the bit and spinning. I recommend pull out the batts of insulation, do the electrical work and they reinstall the same batts you pulled. Also assuming you have vapor barrier or retarder on the face ...


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Fiber reinforcement is not a new idea. People built houses with straw reinforced mud brick and straw reinforced mud plaster thousands of years ago. Before drywall became popular in the 1950’s, wooden lath and plaster was the dominated way of building and finishing interior walls. The plaster was reinforced by animal hairs like horsehair, cow hair and goat ...


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You will want to cut the corner bead out anyway. If you put new tape and texture on top of the existing corner bead, you will end up with two very noticeable lumps.


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Assuming the following scenario, I don't think taping offers much. If there's movement in the framing at the corner, tape isn't going to help. Your plan to caulk is probably fine. I'm not sure I'd use silicone, though. It's not paintable. An acrylic-silicone blend or flexible grout would be better. ____________________________________ | | ...


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I usually do tape with fiber tape and thinset , this helps to lock everything together and the corner grout between the tiles won’t crack as easily or often.


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