26

It's a matter of preference, but I would float scrap lumber backing at four locations: Down both sides Across the bottom between the two studs Across the between the two studs just below the plumbing penetrations Anywhere else that seems too flexy when you do a little press-testing 1/2" or thicker plywood and 1-by or 2-by lumber work well. This backing ...


20

Drywall Anchors I have had 100% success with drywall anchors but I am very careful about all aspects of the mounting hardware. You have to design and execute your plan carefully to have success, otherwise they'll be vulnerable to pulling out as Michael Karas points out. If you mess up any aspect of what I set out below, your anchors will probably pull out....


18

What you are using are the most basic drywall anchors available. They're inexpensive and included in many products because of that, but they aren't good for much, and wouldn't be up to the task of holding something a toddler will be climbing on (you know they will...) Look for products that spread out or lock into place when they enter the wall. The name ...


16

Most things that get regularly manipulated should not be hung with hollow-wall anchors. Eventually they pull out or the wallboard disintegrates. I'd install either some 1x4 wooden rails spanning between studs or a piece of finished plywood to which I'd mount the gate. Run construction or finish screws about 1" into the studs. Imagine the typical backer ...


13

This is a tall unit and if it were fully loaded, it could really hurt someone (especially a child) should it fall. Products like the 3M command strips are designed for hooks where the force on them is acting downwards. Your cabinet on the other hand, should it tip, would be pulling away from the wall and I really don't think those strips would hold. If it ...


10

If you have pulled on them and demonstrated that they are sufficiently solid, it sounds like you have a relationship issue involving physics vs. "alternative facts". Personally, for anchoring in wallboard, I prefer "zip-its", also known as auger anchors, tornados, and even wall-drillers, based on their part number at a certain manufacturer. By the way, ...


8

Wood screws directly into a stud are going to be many times stronger then drywall anchors. When you have hit a stud, use a screw. When you are just in the drywall, use a drywall anchor. Drilling out the strong wood to replace with weak plastic doesn't make any sense. If you really wanted to just use anchors, they make metal anchors that can be driven ...


8

You will find many many installations of towel bars that are simply the crappy drywall anchors on each end. These will work as long as the towel bar is treated with kid gloves. Anything more and eventually the towel bar will end up loose at the wall mounts. If there is not a framed in set of backing behind the towel bar location then your next best bet is ...


7

While having all four mount points connect to structure (aka: the stud) is ideal, I think in your case, having two mount points in wood and two in a drywall anchor, you're going to be ok. Consider this question: What is the weight capacity of a drywall screw? One drywall screw CAN (not should) hold a lot of weight for its size. Also a properly installed ...


7

EZ anchors are good but toggle bolts are better.


7

For large heavy objects that you want to span multiple studs, I like a french cleat. You can buy them out of metal from the store, or make your own by ripping a board at 45 degrees along it's length. Screw in the wall part to each stud with a long screw or lag bolt, and get either a counter sunk or flush head. And on the back of the clock, you can use lots ...


7

I don't ever attach drywall unless it has attached backing on each side. To float the backing and have it come out solid and flush and not cause drilling issues is both a thing that needs to be practiced and it needs the appropriate access. For something like this I would go to next stud for sure. Also I would build a little access box jutted out ...


6

The simplest high-strength solution, if there isn't blocking behind the plaster to support it, is to mount the towel rack on an attractive piece of well-varnished wood (or a piece painted to match the room's trim) and mount that to two studs. Obviously this won't suit all tastes. Then again, no towel bar will suit all tastes.


6

You may have to pull out the anchor, fill the hole, redrill it and install a new anchor if the first one has become too misfigured. Be careful not to overtighten. You could also get some other kind of anchors like these screw in kind that hold beter.


5

Try your best not to pull out the whole bracket/clip without trying to pry the nail portion out first. The anchor used in these clips are the kind that split in half inside the wall so if you pry the whole fitting out, you will end up with an unnecessarily large hole to patch. Unfortunately, as you can tell from the pictures, it's not easy to simply pry ...


5

The wall is already damaged - nails do that to walls - so you're looking at fixing the wall no matter what. With that in mind, you want a hammer, a small pry bar, a small quantity of joint compound or "wall repair spackle" (the latter is in the paint department), a sponge, a 1" putty knife, 1 pint or quart of primer and an equal quantity of interior paint ...


5

They make many different types of wall anchors. I have used different forms of E-Z Anchors for years and am happy with them. They hold up to 100 pounds in sheetrock with their toggle lock anchors. 1 of the normal screw anchors can hold 25 pounds in half inch rock. I am sure those brackets have more than one mounting hole? Place on the wall where you ...


5

If this is a wall to wall carpet then the back edge of the cabinet most likely sitting on the tacking strip that is placed around the edge of the room under the carpet. Making the cabinet lean forward slightly. You could try placing one or 2 shims under the front edges of the cabinet to level cabinet or even raise the front a bit so it tends to lean back ...


5

You will NOT want to support your 78 1/2 inch rod from the drywall alone. Drywall fastened up to the ceiling is a pretty good challenge just holding up it's own weight then yet you trying to add 70 pounds to that. So what you want to do is to locate the support members (usually called ceiling joists) to which the drywall is attached. You would then want to ...


5

No, drywall does not wear out. But holding excessive loads on anchors in drywall is a guarantee of failure. Drywall anchors do tolerably well in shear (loads downward, like hanging a picture) and fairly poorly when yanked on/outwards repeatedly. Once they move at all, they will quickly crumble until they come right out. Nor are they at all good for anything ...


4

You may be able to run the screw right into the framing with out using the anchors. It will hold much better if it is framing and not wood lath or masonry. if the brackets are directly over the window, you may have found the header.


4

It depends on the type of anchor and the length of the screw, but I think you may have another problem. Most drywall anchors rely on the screw to expand the anchor and secure it into the drywall. In these cases, if the screw is not into the anchor to an adequate depth, the anchor will not have sufficient purchase in the sheetrock. With this said, however, ...


4

Use toggles, but also put at least one good fastener into the stud. (Even if you have to drill a new hole/holes in the mount.)


4

Last time I encountered that, I put two 2x4's across the stud span, chamfered the edges too a 45 angle and painted it to match the wall. Mounted the bracket onto that, if it's a rental or you just don't want to wreck the walls, put a thin piece of cardboard between the 2x4 and wall before you mount it to make sure it doesn't pull up any paint when you remove ...


4

No those anchors will NOT be sufficient to hold up THAT shelf. Those shelf brackets are too short and there will be a LARGE pulling force on the upper screw. Assuming from the image that's a 10 inch shelf and the screws at 2 inches apart, hanging 79lbs on the edge of the shelf will get you a whopping 395 LBS of pull force on the top screw. When you ...


4

Yes, per anchor unless otherwise specified (and sometimes it is, e.g. in pairs). Accurate? This is advertising we're talking about, and assumes perfect conditions. I'd halve the number given. Regarding your car example, obviously at some point the load will overcome either the structural integrity of the entire drywall sheet (as opposed to the local ...


3

Typically you would remove them, however the anchor you are using is marketed as a "stud solver" meaning that it can be driven into a stud. I think it is fine to leave them. If you were using small plastic drywall anchors then I'd definitely remove them and drive a screw directly into the stud.


3

If you are concerned about the weight an easy solution is to put a sheet of plywood (or nicer wood, if it will still be visible once the TV is in place) across 3 studs. Secure it with 2 screws into each stud. Then screw the wall mount into the wood. Doing it this way will definitely support the weight of any TV you might try to mount. And allows you to ...


3

TapCon concrete screws would be minimal damage to the concrete, so I'd consider them first. However, if you must not damage the concrete, then it's more challenging. My next recommendation would be to use a wooden backing that is vertically longer/higher than the coat rack. If your coat rack is 20cm high where it contacts the wall, then make your wood ...


3

Sounds like your sheetrock is somehow damaged from moisture or the EZ Toggle would have certainly worked. You now need to install wood backing, or move your speakers so the brackets can be screwed into the studs. To install wood backing, first you need to cut out a rectangle of your wall's sheetrock slightly larger than the intended size of the backing ...


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