Hot answers tagged

24

The cause is simply nature. You've got wood that's outside. It gets wet, the wet stays in the wood, the wood rots. This happens when wood is left outside in an area where water can get stuck and the wood wasn't properly installed (no caulk) and isn't properly maintained (not regularly painted/caulked). Much of the rot seems to start near places where ...


12

First, you need to understand what "dry rot" is. The name itself is misleading, except that infected wood becomes brittle and crumbling when it is dry. Basically, dry rot is a fungus. In dry conditions it is dormant, but if there is moisture available and the temperature is warm enough (and that only means "cool", in terms of weather conditions, not "hot") ...


10

Because that's what wood does, especially when exposed to regular and/or prolonged moisture. The lack of gable overhangs on the home are a factor. Even cedar and other rot-resistant species have their lifespans, and apparently 25 years is it in your climate. You'll need to replace the boards (or the portions that are decaying) with properly treated or ...


9

It's hard to say for sure without pulling it apart but your pictures suggest to me that you have water getting behind the wood at that corner. The reason I think this might be the case is that you basically have no visible problem except at the bottom of the board where it intersects with a horizontal piece. What I mean to say here is that this looks to me ...


7

We require “back priming”. That means pre-paint all surfaces before the trim is installed...especially cut ends. End grain on trim sucks up moisture more than side grain.


7

Are you sure about the load bearing? It may sag if you are not careful... Anyway either replace the post completely or make a replacement bottom section and support the rest of the structure - acrow jacks work well for this type of thing. This is one example of a supplier of acrow jacks - many others... : https://www.scaffolding-direct.co.uk/new-size-3-...


6

The post should really be replaced, at the least add a new bottom utilizing a structural splice The issue with the structural splice, the new post section will not be the same dimension as the original, and will be quite noticeable. With a new post, it still may not be the same, but it will not be a noticeable as the splice. Another way to do it is to ...


6

I had a similar problem with stringers in direct contact with cement that had water runoff. I sawed off 1/2" from the bottom of each of four stringers,screwed in 4- 2 1/2" stainless steel lag screws into the bottom of each stringer. Once back in place, backed out the lag screws like leveling a washing machine. End result, the stringers were 1/2&...


5

There are multiple reasons that it degrades and "rots" from the bottom edge. The lowest point is where all water runs so that part is likely the last part to dry out. The lowest part of the wall gets less protection from any overhang of the roof. The siding material was probably left open with a raw edge at the bottom and the lower back side is exposed. ...


5

It looks to me like the proper fix for this is going to end up being a lot more work that what you probably want to hear about. If I was the contractor recommending the repair scenario I would be saying to remove whole upper structure and replace it anew. Such a flat roof is always a recipe for a mess like this. It it was at all possible to rebuild the ...


5

The frames for the glass are the least of your worries as they are removable. You could attempt some sort of patchup job with bondo and paint, but it wouldn't remove the problems that caused the rot and it would be very difficult to actually bond to partially rotted wood. Your goal would be to cut out all the rotted wood, reinforce the structure if ...


4

In addition to what Michael said, I see an another problem: this roof structure is a moisture trap if you live somewhere that's not a desert and where it ever gets cold. Moisture-laden interior air that's trying to get out will migrate up through the ceiling drywall and the air-permeable fiberglass insulation until it hits a cold surface. That cold surface ...


4

If you can stop the moisture, then you'll stop the dryrot...unlike insect infestation...and this appears to be dryrot. The problem is completely stopping the moisture... Moisture can come from: 1) leaks through the siding, 2) moisture reflecting (bouncing) off the ground, 3) inadequate moisture barrier behind the siding, 4) roof leaks due to inadequate roof ...


4

The other answers here offer some useful information but the more I think about this the more I'm inclined to think that this is not a result of water hitting the outside of the siding. I think it's more likely that you have water infiltration at the roof or around a window. The reason you see it at the bottom is that, as noted by other answers, is where ...


4

Yes, it could lead to wood rot and a severe mold problem. Don't do it.


3

If this wall is parallel to the trusses, it is probably not load bearing. At least that would be typical. Water infiltration You must address the cause of the water infiltration, or this will only happen again. You noted the lack of housewrap, and that may be contributing, but since its by the window I'd say correct window flashing is essential. Check ...


3

It has already been stated here, but my vote is for an unsealed bottom edge. The siding looks similar to something that was/is called Masonite. It was some sort of composite wood-ish stuff that sounded good on paper, but didn't hold up to the promises in the real world. The biggest culprit was the bottom edges of lap siding that were (you guessed it!) ...


3

First, it's worth noting that "wind chill temperature" isn't an actual temperature. It's a way of describing the rate of heat loss as compared to a no-wind scenario. For purposes of this discussion, it's irrelevant. Why does condensation form on the inside of my windows in the winter? If the temperature of the glass is below the dew point inside your home (...


3

This isn't a stellar answer because there's more information needed. But here's a start. First, your roof system is built with trusses, so the forces acting on the wood behave a little differently than classic stick framing. (For instance, some members are in tension; others are in compression.) In picture #1, the crack: it's not clear to me what function ...


2

To answer the way the issue should be fixed is to replace the window. That way the rotted framing can be repaired too without the window in the way or have any fear of having the window drop from trying to undermine the old framing or, if the framing is still intact, if offers access to inspect it properly. I can see though, it will be quite costly to do. ...


2

How much moisture is ok depends on the window frame material and the material that condensation may drip or seep onto. The primary issue is rot. If your storm windows are aluminum or vinyl, some condensation will not likely cause damage. Wood windows will see degradation of their finish and ultimately wood decay. The only way to completely prevent ...


2

This related question answers 1 and 2: condensation forms when moist air meets a cold surface (your windows). Those windows get colder at night, since the outside air temperature drops as well. Not a whole lot you can do about that, except get better windows or decrease the humidity. You've stumbled upon a problem in the winter months - what's best for your ...


2

Since mold and structural integrity are safety issues, any answer that isn't "yes" is "no" - and the answer isn't "yes."


2

Tear it all off and rebuild a roof that's not made out of 2x4's. To fix-at-it, tear off all the ceiling drywall. Temporarily support the beams and remove the sisters (the tacked-on LVL's). Insert new 2x4 sisters that go the entire span, tucked above the header that would of been behind you while taking that picture, short enough to slip up into the cavity, ...


2

How do I make clean, square cuts to the rafter (tail)? You may want to try to gently insert shims to add a little extra space between the rafter and the 1x4 roof boards. I would use a circular saw to start; you will not be able to cut all the way through (5") with a common circular saw, but it will give you a clean cut through a few inches. You'll need to ...


2

I think your staggered-joint idea is a good one. From the look of it you'll have a solid enough base to get another decade or two from that tail. I'd cut back just enough to get solid wood at the center, then notch the sides back to wherever you can comfortably fit the saw. Something like so: | | |__ __| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |...


2

Underneath the drip-edge is the Fascia board. This is usually 1 x 4 inch stock (looking at your photo).Fascia board can be of any variety of wood or composite although Pine can be painted to protect it from the elements, Redwood and other weather resistant wood species can be used to increase longevity. Below the Fascia is a Trim molding. This is sometimes ...


2

Lots of good information above. Here's a slightly different view on the matter. (Professional carpenter here; have built traditional windows/doors.) First, you've gotten a quote that seems high for replacement. That might be the real price for the quality of product you want, or you might have found the most expensive distributor in the town. Get a couple ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible