15

My suggestion is to add to the size of the concrete drive way in the following manner: This gives you the option of backing up out of the car port in the new area toward the rear yard. Then you can drive in a forward direction which would be far easier to navigate by the truck and the corner of the house. Additionally the part added onto the side nearer ...


13

Most towns/cities will not be too happy with you, if you start cutting up their road. So you'll have to use a method that will be completely on your property. Dump some dirt The easiest solution would be to build up the area with a load of dirt. Using a wheelbarrow and a shovel, grab some dirt from another location in your yard. If you can't find a place ...


12

Looks badly done - grass should have been removed before paving, grade fixed if needed so water won't run from driveway into garage. For a crude fix, place a slot drain right up against the garage to divert water, and infill with lots of "cold patch" to make the slope inbetween as smooth as possible, rather than this huge drop at the end of the pavement. ...


11

Sounds like you got "Crusher Run", when you wanted "Washed Stone". This site has a good description of some different types. Crusher Run Washed stone It's used as a base for driveways and roads, but is typically compacted and covered by another material (asphalt for example). You may have been thinking of something more like pea gravel, or similar. ...


11

I'd leave the driveway as it is. I'm not a fan of half-acre concrete slabs. I'd install some "rumble strip" edging pavers or small boulders (partially embedded in the ground) to give drivers a haptic warning that they're in danger of encroaching on the architecture.


10

A quick Google search for concrete joint sealer turns up loads of products, most of which seem to be Polyurethane Epoxy. I haven't done enough of this type of work to recommend one brand over another, though I'm sure an employee of your local hardware store will have an opinion. When sealing the joint, you'll want to pay attention to the depth to width ...


10

DIY option: rent a skid steer scrape off existing driveway buy crushed rock spread with skid steer, rake rent a compacter and compact crushed rock layer bring in sand, spread, screed and level. buy concrete pavers start laying them depending on your age/health, buy lots of Advil Good luck!


10

You first need to fill in the cracks. Home Depot has a variety of products available. Some are latex based that are easy to apply but probably best used for smaller cracks up to 1/2" wide. Others are cold patches that you have to compress with a tamper or by driving over them a few times. Some need to be heated with a propane torch. Those I believe are the ...


10

I would go the other way from Michael Karas. I'd eliminate the double S-curve, and make the entry to the carport a steady curve of same radius. That would cause it to miss the house entirely, and move "where the driveway meets the highway" west a bit. And get the ugly driveway away from the front of the house. Add a curb and you shouldn't have any house ...


9

There is really only one way to check the construction of your driveway. You will need to select a couple of locations and using a shovel, remove the top layer to expose the base layer, then remove the base layer to the grade fill and measure the layers. If you are not comfortable that the driveway was built to spec, notify the general contractor or party ...


9

I have been caulking expansion joints in concrete for 15 years. This is what you do: Get the wood out Clean the top 3/4" of the interior walls of the joint with a wire brush Install "closed cell" backer rod into the joint. You want it to be about 1/8"-1/4" larger than the joint. Roll it down in from the side is easiest. The top of the rod should be about 3/...


9

Whether you add on extra concrete or add rumble strips - both really good ideas - I would protect that corner of the house. My neighbor has very very similar rebar sunflower lawn art in their yard as the picture below. You station 4-5 of these around that edge and your house is well protected. If someone is backing on - they will actually hit something ...


8

Another layer of blacktop asphalt, usually a finer "grit", will fill the low spots and get you through another year -- but it sounds like your driveway is under-engineered for the weight you're regularly driving/parking on it. So, you've got a few choices: Another layer of blacktop every year or two, and probably mopping tar on it every summer. Tear it up ...


8

Yes, it is used in construction somewhat commonly. There are a couple of different situations where I have personally be involved with its use: Soil stabilization for large fills - In areas where the ground is soft and heavy construction equipment needs to move (e.g. access roads) it can be placed in layers and filled with soil to help distribute the weight ...


8

I'll throw an answer out there, answering my own question but not necessarilly the correct answer. Remove the existing driveway and build a new one that makes more sense: This has the upside of removing the driveway entrance from right in front of the house which I hate. Now I would be able to plant a big tree here! Downside is I will need to hire a crew ...


7

You could dig a dry well, which is a pit for water to collect and soak away through. At the same time, you will raise the grade which will further help reduce the problem. Simply dig the area out to a depth of a foot or two, dump in six inches to a foot of gravel, then re-cover with soil, and have your final grade end up about six inches higher than before....


7

I like the buried chain idea. In fact, you don't even need to use cinder blocks. They make 'earth screws' which are large auger-looking thing that you literally screw into the earth. Typically used as playset tie-downs or party-tent tie downs. Alternatively, maybe attach a bar to one of the fence posts. I'm thinking one of the stainless hand-bars you'd ...


7

You don't need to concrete the whole thing. You do need to shape it correctly. Even in arid areas (seems likely from the picture), water is the major thing that destroys poorly built roads - when it does rain, the water flows down the road and moves material - unless the road is shaped to divert water off to the side in a short distance, so that there is ...


7

Option A: keep doing what you did, and expect it to fail every winter; be pleasantly surprised if it does not some years. Option B: tear up the driveway and put a proper base under it. The lack of a proper base is almost certainly why it self-destructs in winter. If you can stand the annual work, Option A can be done for MANY years before you begin to touch ...


6

Definately do not use concrete to fill the gap. Concrete expands and contracts depending on the temperature so using a hard substance will cause further cracking, expansion joints are critical between slabs. The options are: Replace the wood with wood Use a Joint Sealer With either option, try and pick a time of the year when it is colder. Hotter days ...


6

You may want to look into a sled type snow shovel. One of these would be far more effective at moving snow around than either of the contraptions that you pictured in your question. These sled type shovels also work well in deeper snow. BTW (despite the fact that shopping type questions / answers are generally discouraged here) you can get the Garant 26 ...


6

Ooooh, fiber mesh. Proprietary crap like that is how sellers pad their profit margins. It is like when car dealers sell you "undercoating". The weight of the vehicle and thickness of the concrete does not matter. What matters is the subsurface. If the subsurface is solid 1" (inch) of concrete will support a cement truck. If it is not, it could break under ...


6

Move the driveway like this, plant some trees and shrubs in front of the house


5

Your problem is the ground under asphalt is not strong enough to sustain load. If you put a new layer of asphalt over the existing driveway it will get the same rut very quickly. Asphalt is highly flexible and once the ground under asphalt sags asphalt sags too. The real solution would be to tear the driveway up and put proper ballast. If there's any ...


5

3/4 minus (21AA in US Midwest) is perfect for this application. Hope you have some college kids around, that's nearly 2 cubic yards! I would overdig another 6" to be able to place an edging to retain the gravel and make a clean edge. Place the gravel in 2" "lifts" (lay down 2") and then compact with a plate vibrator. Repeat twice. Enjoy! 6" compacted ...


5

Approximately 9,800 square feet, assuming your drawing is accurate. I hastily colored in the image using MS Paint (not perfect, since JPG compression added a bunch of fuzzy grayscale values). Then using MATLAB with the image processing toolbox: width = 235; % establish scale parameters height = 300; img = imread('areatest.jpg'); % read image in bwImg = ...


5

Most snow blowers have adjustable skid shoes that look something like this: (source: jackssmallengines.com) On smooth hard surfaces, you can typically adjust these to the minimum height so the snow blower "scrapes" the surface. If you have a rough surface then you can adjust these so the blade rides a bit higher and does not catch any of the rough ...


5

Wow, this is complicated. Good road design requires a good base and any turns require an added width due to a turning vehicle. (The added width at turns depends on the size of any anticipated vehicles.) Let’s start with the basics. Let’s say it’s straight and it’s 10’ wide. Depending on soils conditions, I’d use a minimum of 6” gravel base. I like 3” minus ...


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