New answers tagged

1

Yes. It's a common occurrence especially when I use a DeWalt keyless chuck. If the chuck is sized for 1/2 inch capacity it will happen more than 3/8 or 1/4 inch chucks (from my observations). If I really need a driver or a bit to remain secure and the chuck to keep a solid bite I'll tighten the chuck with Channel Lock pliers or something similar. Grip the ...


5

Looks like brick dust. As for the other two holes, they probably went into the mortar joint between two bricks.


0

The technique is to angle the bit after it walks to get it back on track. Doesn't work if you do a pilot hole, and probably not until you've done several hundred Tapcons. But even I could mess this up, and if it was unsatisfactory I'd mount them to a placard.


3

Start with a small bit. (or maybe a diamond dremel bit.) You still want to use a punch, then use a 1/8"th bit, or smaller if you can find one. Then step up to the size you need for your anchor or screw. The small hole will help guide the larger bit. Alternatively you could make a jig; Drill a hole of the size you need to guide your masonry bit in a ...


1

Look at the ADT panel and see if it is recessed into the wall. If so, where are the wires leaving the panel? (From the bottom, top, one side, the other side, both sides, all over?) If the wires are exit the panel vertically and not horizontally (out the sides) you can safely focus on finding the studs. IF they go out the sides then measure the height(s) the ...


1

If that ADT control panel is recessed into the wall between two studs then you will likely need to avoid drilling anywhere behind it from the other side of that wall. I would leave a working margin of an additional 3 to 4 inches along the sides and tops.


0

If the drill dried out and still worked, it is fine. please don't waste a perfectly good drill. Dumps are getting full because we throw everything away for the smallest reasons. About lights flickering whenever a large current draw occurs... the other poster mentioned a floating neutral which is a good possibility. Any power tool should have a 3-prong ...


0

This could be a "floating neutral," which is a serious electrical problem. See this other question here on stackexchange. In my case I resolved the problem by calling the power company. They asked "Do your lights flicker?" They replaced a nearby power pole within a few hours. You could also have a poor/ineffective electrical ground. Does ...


0

Will it fit? almost certainly. Is it a good idea? probably not. Most modern regular drills* have a 3 jaw chuck which will grip round or hexagonal objects in a wide variety of sizes. While I can't see the jaws of the chuck in your photo I would be extremely surprised if it was not such a chuck. The problem with using a corded drill as a screwdriver is that ...


3

You absolutely can. In the professional world that's the standard, in fact. Your drill can accept any round or hexagonal bit or driver up to 10mm in diameter. It's not fussy. Chucks don't vary between corded and cordless tools, generally speaking.


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