Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

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1

I bought some shorter Tapcons and noticed the shank on the new ones was thicker than the old ones I had. The short ones went in as easy as could be expected but the shank did not break as the old ones did. 1/4" Tapcons with 3/16" drilled hole as they suggest. They must have made them thicker due to breaking.


3

Is your wall made of cake? That first picture looks like cake. But seriously, look at the plastic anchor your tried to put in that hole and compare it to another one. I think you will find that the used one is broken. What happened is you screwed that anchor in to a stud, and it broke, leaving plastic behind. Drywall anchors are used to hang things on ...


3

As Criggie suggests there are options to create or buy such tool like some kind of "drill holder/base": Of course, check if it's calibrated.


1

If you've got a drill that has a removable front handle, your best bet is to buy a drill press accessory for it. The cheapest are under £/$/€20 and you'll save that in drill bits over a few years. I keep my mains drill in my press as I've got a good cordless for other jobs. Screw/clamp the press to your workbench, and clamp down the workpiece. These ...


6

One dirty hack is an old optical disk, a CDROM or a DVD or similar. Lay this on the stock, or tape it on if the stock is not flat. Make sure the silver reflective side is facing your drill. Put your drill through the hole in the middle, and its really easy to see when the drill is not square by the reflections. Check in two different directions separated ...


11

Feeds and speeds First, there is one correct feed and speed that will make even a $1 drill cut like through butter. This is an eye-opener for those new to metal work; they think they can buy effective cutting with expensive bits. Nope, it is not for sale. What you're thinking is a waterknife; you can definitely buy those! I work in metal a lot; and I don'...


15

If I have to drill square tubing with a hand operated electric drill I will use a square and mark a line all the way around the four sides of the tubing at the location along the length where the hole is to be located. Then mark the center locations of the holes on the two faces of the tubing on opposite sides. Then use a center punch to dimple the center ...


2

I usually drill a pilot all the way through and "drill craft" is paramount... If you let the drill change angle from upright as you go through, then that sideways load on the bit will snap it.


0

First off, buy a good studfinder. They should be able to detect the stud even through a layer of stucco. When you do find a stud, put on your safety glasses and pre-drill the locations of your screws with a standard bit, use just enough force to gently go through the stucco, it's not as hard as cement and this should be fairly easy with a standard bit. You ...


0

Have you considered other ways of fastening? My limited experience with stucco is that you really don't want to put holes in it. Alternatives: Create some form of protrusions on the box. Bolt and nut comes to mind. Sanding and scratching the back of the box might work. Rig up a way to hold the box in position. Meanwhile, mix up a small quantity of ...


1

For stucco I would consider using plastic expansion anchors. For a smallish screw these should work well and minimize the size of hole you have to drill into the stucco. You have to be rather careful when drilling in stucco in that it is rather easy to find your hole getting larger diameter than you want. This happens when the carbide cutting tips on the ...


1

If you look closely at the pictures of the two sets of drills that you linked you will notice something right away. The driver tang on the SDS Plus is smaller diameter than the smallest drill which is 1/2". On the other hand the driver tang on the SDS Max is the diameter of the 3/4" drill in the set. Beyond those differences the drills are pretty much the ...


1

My gut instinct is that you want an SDS Plus drill, for the simple reason that if you wanted an SDS Max drill, you'd know that you wanted SDS Max - They are obvious beasts. The largest hole I've drilled would be a 4-5 inch hole through a single course of brick, which would have been better served by me renting a core drill, but I still got through in about ...


2

Do not cut the rebar in the concrete ceiling slab. Rebar is placed in concrete slabs (and beams) for tension. Cutting the rebar eliminates the resistance to tensile stress and could cause immediate failure (collapse of the slab).


1

Presuming that this type of chuck, sometimes known as a Jacobs chuck, is assembled in a manner similar to that found on drill presses, one can expect that the outer retaining shell is a press fit to the body. The trick on such a small chuck is supporting the outer shell while applying extraction force to the jaws. Many videos abound on the 'net using the ...


1

There are also single-use products like the DustBubble. I used something like this a few years ago when drilling holes into walls in my home, and it worked pretty well. Pros: Easy for one person to use You can (pretty much) still see where you're drilling No need to get your vacuum cleaner out Cons: Single use, so not environmentally ideal Single use, so ...


1

I use a small box that's taped to the wall just below the hole. (it's a mini milk box, about 1" by 8" by 6". The 1" gap for the dust to fall into catches pretty much all of it and the fact it's a box means you can drill more than one hole before it needs emptying. (just make sure the tape retains it's sticky each time you move it or it'll fall down, ...


3

I use a variety of methods (included in other answers) depending on the situation, but in most for about the past year I have been happy with the Milwaukee M12 HAMMERVAC. No additional cords or hoses, the depth stop is useful, good battery life and fits my tools from multiple brands (it comes with three different sized collars, but your mileage may vary). ...


9

A combination of my "vacuum near drill point" answer and @mrks' mini-vacuum Karcher device answer: You can get a (hopefully) universal vacuum cleaner collector attachment for collecting drilling dust: and then you can use your large independent vacuum cleaner; the head should attach to the surface you're drilling into by the force of the vacuum: However,...


10

Squirt bottle Wet the wall area just as you start, then as soon as the bit is seated, use one hand to squirt a small amount of water at the hole in frequent intervals. This will assure the stuff comes out as mud. The point of the squirt bottle is to allow you to tightly regulate the amount of water, so you aren't adding any more water than needed to do ...


4

I saw a similar question asked somewhere (possibly here, though I'm not about to be that "marked as duplicate" guy), and I suggested the post-it method already mentioned. Someone else then commented that he worked in a clean-room environment where atmospheric dust was a problem, and they used shaving foam(!): Position the drill, spray some shaving foam on/...


13

I am using this tool (Kärcher DDC 50). You put the drill through the hole on the right, and the battery-driven vacuum not only sucks the dust into the storage container but also sucks the entire tool onto the wall, making this a hands-free operation. Careful with wallpapers - sometimes the suction is too strong and you might see some creases afterwards. ...


18

In addition to the halved tennis ball trick, when drilling walls, I usually use Post-It notes. Take one sheet, fold it horizontally away from the sticky side, then stick it to the wall just below the hole you're drilling. The fold will open up just a bit under its own weight. As you drill, the dust will accumulate in this fold - once the hole is done, ...


0

I have only used my hammer drill three times, and only once for a job where I couldn't possibly have gotten away with a normal rotary drill. I'm glad I got it second-hand. I use my ordinary cordless drill pretty much every weekend. It was well worth the $100USD I paid for it new ~6 years ago, and I'll probably buy a similar model when the (now discontinued) ...


1

Just buy an appropriately-formed plastic device to put around the head of your drill. A search on AliExpress yields a few promising candidates: and


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