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3

Yeah, newbies + metal drilling is usually a recipe for disaster. Usually I'm a fan of having newbies use hand tools for a good while until they get the tactile feel of the tool and the material. That's hard to do in drills, though, as proper, usable hand drills are practically unobtanium these days. So I'd prefer newbs start with a drill press where ...


2

They are finished, buy new bits. It would be very unusual for a home craftsman to properly sharpen a bit. I suggest buying three bits of graduated sizes, drilling small ,medium , and final size holes. That little straight section in the center of the bit point is called the chisel, it does not cut but pushes metal aside. So by using a small drill first( with ...


2

The pics aren't clear enough for me to comment on the specific bits, but a couple of general hints: start with a small hole and increase drill bit size until you get to your desired size. It's particularly hard for a large-ish bit to make the central dent that gets the rest of the bit cutting slow is better than fast, as you have less risk of overheating ...


1

My sheetrock was close to the outside concrete block wall. A 3" bolt hit the block wall and stood out too much from the bracket I was installing. A 2" bolt wouldn't go in far enough to allow the wings to expand. After some thought I decided to drill a 3/8 inch hole into the concrete block deep enough to allow a 3" bolt to go in far enough so it wouldn't ...


1

You can simply grind down the point of the bit you have to suit this job, rather than purchasing another tool and hoping that it will conform to the geometry you need. Nothing says that a tool is unalterable once you own it. Note - do not remove it entirely (that will prove VERY hard to use) and do keep it centered.


1

I may understand your situation. I assume it looks like this (in plan view): _____ |_____| * * * <-- planned cable * __*__ |_____| | | **|*|******** <-- existing cable |_| If that's accurate, simply drill a hole at a diagonal, like so, from whichever side gets you the most clearance: _____ |_//__| | | | | |_| This hole can ...


34

Those are replacement brushes for the electric motor in your drill. They are what make the electrical contact to the coil in the motor that spins, while also allowing it to spin. The rectangular part on the end will eventually wear out. It's nice of your drill manufacturer to give you a set of spares. You can swap these out either by removing a couple of ...


0

Amazon and other retailers carry drill bits with points shaped for drilling into acrylic and other plastics, minimizing the possibility of cracking and grabbing. The angle may not be quite the same as a pencil point, however. The images I've found are varied, although my set of bits have a severe taper.


0

You may have seen a taper reamer, there are a few different tapers. They are made to cut steel so wood is easy. They would need a 1/16 to 1/8 pilot hole as they do not cut in the center. I have a few from when I worked in a bit factory. I expect they are very expensive to buy. However, I would drill a regular hole and use a dowel.


2

As Robin Whittleton correctly pointed out, MOSJÖ does not need to be anchored to walls, there's no such instruction in the manual and there are no anchoring parts provided. Considering we're on Home Improvement site, you can add doors, shelves etc. to it on your own. From now on true common sense must work. There are two modes of failure of the furniture ...


0

You should probably anchor most furniture to walls. Almost all furniture has a non neglible toppling hazard, and toppling is mesyy - you do not want your furniture and its contents damaged. And this can happen easily, especially if your furniture has drawers or e.g. is top heavy. You will need only very few equipment to secure your furniture and you ...


32

No, nothing to do. If you download the assembly instructions for MOSJÖ you won’t see anything about a bracket for attaching the item to the wall, and there isn’t one included in the package.


4

The IKEA piece in question would have come with a small metal bracket with screws. One arm of the bracket attaches to your furniture and the other arm has a largish hole in it which you have to figure out how to attach to your wall, the details of which depend very much on what your wall happens to be made of and how far away from it the piece is. People who ...


25

"Why do I have to attach IKEA furniture to the wall specifically? No other furniture seller requires this." This is because of IKEA's iconography in the minds of the public. If you buy a locally made TV stand from George Utrecht Family Furniture down on Mill Road, and a child climbs on it and it falls over, you'd never dream of suing old George. You ...


13

I have put a lot of these IKEA TV stands together for people and always suggest that they let me secure them to a wall. The old style TVs were so heavy that the stands were absolutely going no where but the flat screen TVs are light and high and can be positioned toward the front of the stand, making it easy to topple over. I know of adults that have ...


19

Perhaps not, but recognize the risks. A few years ago, there were several tragic accidents where young children were crushed by Ikea furniture. Since then, Ikea has issued recalls and safety warnings, instructing people to attach their furniture to the wall to avoid such incidents. The piece you mention is only 30lbs (14 kg) and 15" (40 cm) tall, so it's ...


4

If you have young children in your house I'd fasten it to the wall. Ikea started providing this as a standard after a child died after tipping over a piece of their furniture. If you don't have children it's not really necessary, just a thing Ikea's lawyers are telling them to include in all their furniture sets now. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...


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