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5

Easy / Fast: A corded electrical drill is used ensure power. I use a hole saw to drill a knockout in metal electrical fixtures. I start with a small hole so that the hole saw will stay on target. Ear and Eye protection must be used. In my experience it worth every penny to purchase a good hole saw set, along with ear and eye protection.


32

Consider buying a step drill bit for drilling clean holes in thin materials. Step drills look like this: The magic happens because they increase the size of the hole gradually, and each previous step holds the work steady as the next step cuts the material. You can find various demos on youtube, but basically if you've ever tried drilling a sheet material ...


6

7/8". There are some connectors labelled 3/8" such as an Halex 05103B, the 3/8" in that describes the nominal size of the cable or flex being fitted to the connector. If you click the link the catalog page show in misc notes that it fits 1/2" knockout. The nominal description of knockout size corresponds to raceway sizes the hole is cut ...


10

If you have an electrician buddy borrow his knockout punch for the size you need, probably for 1/2". If not you probably can rent one. They typically come in sets. You will need to drill a how maybe 3/8" depending on the punch set. You then place the bolt through the die, then place the bolt through the hole you drilled, then thread the punch on ...


0

Sometimes you just get a wall like that. I have similar spot in my house, where detector beeps over several foot of wall. Electrician just laughed at it, but didn't suggest any fixes, so it is probably ok. It may be connected to moisture, grounding wires grounding in wall itself, induction from cables and so on. If you have a neon voltage probe (the "...


0

Use a hammer drill to pre-drill the holes. Then use an impact drill for the tapcons themselves.


2

Assuming the fence posts need a hole bigger than about half an inch (probably more like 2 to 8 inches) and you want a clean round hole, use a diamond core bit not a hammer. A "hammer drill" (the kind that vibrates when you lean on it) will help you make small holes in stone, suitable for screws but not for a fence post. A more powerful rotary ...


2

It's not about amperage... Hammer drills are garbage. In a hammer drill, the whole chuck moves back and forth, and that imparts some motion the the drill bit. Most of the power is wasted moving the chuck (which is heavy) back and forth, and very little power ends up doing useful work. So instead you get a rotary hammer with a SDS chuck. This has a pneumatic ...


3

Any true concrete drill like this 4.2A Makita will work. Any drill with a chuck that takes an sds-plus bit should work. 3/8" holes are not particularly a big deal. Some "hammer drills" have a regular drill chuck that you can use a masonry bit, but you would likely be just as well off using your forehead.


2

0 Amperes. Grab a star drill and a hand sledge and your safety glasses and ear muffs and have at it. Now, if you'd like to do it faster, you might want more. If you are mainly doing this one project, then see what your rental center has for a hammer drill to rent, and use that, and return it when done. Other than that option, any hammer drill will do it, and ...


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