New answers tagged

1

Use an oscillating tool with a blade for metal. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VJzEF0j0VA


2

You have work-hardened the holes by letting the bit turn without removing metal. Work-hardening can increase the steel strength by 6 times+ ;like from 50 ksi tensile to 300 ksi tensile . One the hole surface in the plate is hardened above 200 ksi , it is too hard for a new sharp bit to cut. Every turn should remove metal or the bit is burnishing/hardening ...


1

I had to drill 1/2" holes in hardened steel mower blades. The blades were meant to go on a 5/8" arbor 5ft mower deck. After a lot of research on machinist sites & discussion boards I found that these guys were recommending to use carbide tipped concrete bits. So off to Lowes .. I found a Bosch 1/2" bit that had an aggressive carbide tip. Now I ain't ...


4

Do not under any circumstances use used motor oil, as has been suggested. As well as being filthy it is seriously carcinogenic and an environmental hazard and should only ever go to your local recycling site. You really need machine cutting oil, which is much more of a coolant than a lubricant, and needs to be supplied continuously in adequate quantity, ...


4

Use a 'speeds and feeds' calculator to determine the ideal combination for the material, diameter, etc. in question. This should help you get a feel for the best possible circumstance and see how close you can get to it with the stuff you have available. Here is an example: https://www.whitneytool.com/SpeedAndFeedCalculator.aspx When you get into this level ...


16

Cutting should be easy This is true for generally all tool-bit-upon-steel work. You should cut long, continuous "chips" (strings, really) that come off like pasta, to the point where you sometimes have to intervene to break them, to keep them from rats-nesting around the drill. run quite cool, to where you can disengage the bit from the work and grab it ...


0

Using a good cutting fluid helps a lot keeping your drill bit from overheating. Also keep the drilling speed low prevents unnecessary heat buildup.


28

3/8" mild (hot-rolled) steel isn't difficult to drill, but any bit will fail if you get it hot enough to melt the cutting edge. Each hole should take no more than a minute. Use a sequence of sizes (1/8", 1/4", 3/8"). This makes for quicker drilling and allows each bit to cool between uses. If you only have "pilot point" bits on hand, use a starter bit that'...


5

The quickest and easiest way is to take them to a steel fabrication shop. They have hydraulic punches that would make short work of that. The church we used to attend had to build scissor trusses to support a remodel and tried to drill the steel plates. it took forever and was costly in terms of drill bits (Good steel is tough on bits.) They bought a ...


0

You have an extremely sensitive digital non-contact voltage detector. Buy an analog one and you'll reduce the amount of false positives. Your current one is obviously detecting AC voltage in the wall, it's just too sensitive. If you don't know the difference, basically just get one that doesn't beep.


1

It's not a "break-in" smell, it's more likely a residual smell stirred up by the air movement now that it is running again. Once a belt burns, that burned rubber smell permeates everything, even the paint. If you have double checked everything as previously suggested and find no evidence of new problems, I would run it for a while and see if the smell ...


2

A burning rubber smell comes from friction between the belt and something else. A well adjusted belt should not smell on break in. Possibilities: Belt rubbing on a pulley that's out of alignment (probably not since it's been checked) Belt rubbing on rubber left behind from the previous belt (clean the pulleys) Belt slipping (check and adjust tension if ...


1

This won't be possible in many circumstances, but it would work in the one you describe: Place a third board (scrap wood) below the other two. Screw the second board to the third. Screw the first to the second. The screws should be within the cut-out area, but not close to the pilot hole or the blade. The saw should be easy to remove while it's still ...


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