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55

Drills and impact drivers are similar in that they're both rotating power tools and they have some overlap in usage, but they work differently and have different strengths. Drills apply a constant torque and tend to have good control across a range of speeds and clutch settings. They're good for work that requires care or precision, like drilling a hole or ...


50

Here are some charts from Bolt Depot. Bolt Depot is a handy resource, and has lots of information about all different types of fasteners. Pilot hole size: Wood Screw Diameter: ****Major thread diameter** is measured on the outside of the threads.*


50

Lay the steel plate on the concrete where you want it. Draw a line around it. Cut a piece of paper to the same size as the steel plate. Place it on the concrete in the same position as the marked outline. Locate the concrete holes by gently pressing down where you think they are (tracing paper makes this even easier). Poke a hole through the paper at ...


41

For this you can use wall drilling anchors as shown in the images below. They are also known as wall plugs or rawl plugs. You can get them from any hardware shop.


35

A real simple technique I use is to hold up the drill bit and the screw. Hold the shaft of the drill bit up in front of the screw. You should only be able to see the threads of the screw (and maybe a bit of the screw). If you can't see the threads the drill bit is too big. If you can see too much of the screw, the bit is too small. I hope this helps!


34

Is my cabinet maker correct They are right that drilling clean holes in glass is more difficult than in wood or steel. In my opinion, they are not right to say that visible cracking around the hole is normal. They are a professional and part of the price they charge is for having the skill, experience and tools to do the job better and quicker than you ...


33

That's plaster, not drywall, and you've encountered metal lath. It was commonly used at corners and other vulnerable locations to add strength and crack resistance. It won't be a problem to cut a small amount away for your purposes. Just be careful to not snag it with a power tool and rip things loose. An abrasive grinding wheel might be a good bet.


33

Vacuum near the point of drilling Have someone to stand next to you with the nozzle of a (running) vacuum cleaner, and position it very carefully near the where the drill bit enters the wall. Preferably - under the drill point facing up, so as not to "compete" with gravity. Most of the dust should be caught by the vacuum cleaner. Down-sides to this ...


30

Absolutely no problem. The screws (actually called "lag bolts") bite into the wood immediately around them, and the wood fibers around that hold the bolt in place. Yes the holes you made already weaken the fibers immediately around them but the amount is insignificant. And, for a flat screen TV like you're describing, the weight you'll be putting on ...


30

Get it wet! When drilling or cutting stone, using water to cool the bit will help cut faster and smoother and prolong the life of the bit. When drilling in the wet hole, you don't need a special drill because all of the electrics are safely away from the water. When using a saw or grinder, one made for wet cutting is recommended. Of course, using water ...


29

Obviously, safety considerations like isolating that circuit are paramount, and note that even if that circuit's breaker is off, then the neutral touching earth can still trip the Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker... Find the socket / box that that wire goes to, disconnect it, then pull it out from the other end (which you need to find - either in the roof ...


28

Homemade Stops Wrap a bit of tape around the bit, to mark the desired depth. Then carefully drill your holes, stopping when you've reached the tape. I've also seen this done with a bit of wire. WARNING: Wrapping the wire in the wrong direction, can lead to property damage, injury, and death. Store Bought Stops Or you could purchase a drill stop. Which ...


28

I used to work for a company that built machines that drilled these holes (though we did it in much larger pieces, usually 3/4" to 2" thickness). It's not a hard process, it's slightly expensive, but it's doable. The process is basically as follows: Use two diamond-tipped drill bits to cut the hole (one above and one below); Use a water-jet to push water ...


28

3/8" mild (hot-rolled) steel isn't difficult to drill, but any bit will fail if you get it hot enough to melt the cutting edge. Each hole should take no more than a minute. Use a sequence of sizes (1/8", 1/4", 3/8"). This makes for quicker drilling and allows each bit to cool between uses. If you only have "pilot point" bits on hand, use a starter bit that'...


26

Yes, the drill chuck will mar the finish of the shelf. There is a slight chance of damage to the chuck. Plus, choking down on the bit, like that, obscures your view of the hole (the drill and chuck block it) -- making precision harder to accomplish. The correct way to do this is to use a drill stop. Drill stops are less likely to slip than tape or zip-...


25

I usually just wrap a piece of masking tape around the drill bit leaving the correct length exposed. You can either wrap enough layers of tape around so that it is fairly thick, or leave a "flag" of tape sticking out. Either way will let you drill to the proper depth without the risk of marking the surface. The metal jaws of a drill can easily damage the ...


23

I started using a DeWalt compact impact driver a couple of years ago, and will never go back to a regular drill/driver again, with a few exceptions. The impact driver is superior for most types of screws in hard wood, decking and sheathing. It is also great for self tapping and self drilling screws. It rarely strips the head of the screw as long as you keep ...


22

If there is no wood at all behind this spot anywhere, a plain wall anchor may rip out over time - curtain rails hold curtains which can be heavy, and can flap around in the wind creating vibration which slowly erodes plaster. Here are some better designs of plasterboard anchor (drywall / sheet rock / gibralter board) Rightmost is your standard cheap wall ...


21

Put the drill in reverse, firmly grip the chuck (the part you were calling the head) and gently squeeze the trigger up the point that you cannot hold on. If you hear clicking, and it doesn't torque very much, you need to turn the torque setting up to the maximum (the highest number, or the drill setting if it has one). If it still doesn't budge and you're ...


21

As strange as this might sound, provided there's a stud back there, you can use toothpicks to fill in the hole. The toothpicks can bite into the screw, and provide friction against the surrounding wood. If this is just drywall, use a drywall anchor like the other answers detailed


20

The SDS chuck system was the original developed by Bosch. SDS Plus is an improvement on the original SDS system, but remains compatible with SDS bits, and is now the most commonly seen on the market. SDS Max is designed for the heaviest masonry work, and is incompatible with SDS/SDS+ bits. (source: wikimedia.org) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


20

If you can use a drill with a screwdriver bit to drive a screw, then most of the time, use it. Here's when you might be smarter to use a screwdriver: The screw is going into a pre-tapped (threaded) hole in metal, or plastic, or any soft material. Always at least start such screws by hand -- so that you can avoid cross-threading them. Putting screws into ...


20

Your best bet would be to get some 1/2" PVC Couplings with threaded port and some Misting Nozzles. You should be able to find them both online, or at your local landscaping/gardening center. This setup would allow you to get the desired spray pattern, by selecting the appropriate nozzles.


20

Of course you can, and it's very easy to do. All you need is an appropriate hole saw. Drill from the top down. If you can, hold or clamp a piece of scrap wood under where you are cutting. That will prevent the bottom from splintering. Then to make it really look nice (and prevent any future splinters) you'll want a desk grommet that slips inside the ...


20

The wall looks like plaster or drywall (aka sheetrock). You insert an "anchor" into the hole and thread a screw into the anchor. plastic anchors for plaster or drywall But if there is solid wood of sufficient dimensions behind the plaster you use a long enough screw to thread into the wood. In your case, if you have good wood behind the plaster, but you ...


19

They sell what is called an "Offset" drill. Instead of the chuck being inline with the motor, it is turned 90°. They also make drills where the chuck can be turned to get into tight spots. They also make an offset attachment for most drills.


19

You can't. The tempered glass will completely shatter if this is even attempted. If you absolutely must have tempered glass with a hole in it, the hole or any other shaping must be done before the tempering process.


18

It is possible that there are several reasons for the screw head destruction. You may be using an electrical tool that is not at all suitable for driving screws. Some tools designed for drilling holes are not going to offer enough torque at a low enough speed to properly drive screws. If your tool starts out with a huge burst of speed it can almost ...


18

I'm not sure why someone told you that you can't drill all the way though with a Forstner bit, but in my opinion, they are incorrect. These bits excel at creating a flat-bottomed hole but will also drill completely through the material just fine. I regularly use mine in a drill press but they can also be used in a handheld drill. I find that they splinter ...


18

In addition to the halved tennis ball trick, when drilling walls, I usually use Post-It notes. Take one sheet, fold it horizontally away from the sticky side, then stick it to the wall just below the hole you're drilling. The fold will open up just a bit under its own weight. As you drill, the dust will accumulate in this fold - once the hole is done, ...


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