8

yes it stops the water from pooling at the base of the wall and seeping into the foundation if you can ensure all water goes into the drain there will be no danger though


6

I would cut the PVC and install a cleanout. Once reassembled, you will always have access to the tile system.


6

Disconnect the down spout. This may require you to remove screws and/or rivets. Screws are easy, just use the appropriate driver and back the screw out. Rivets, however, will have to be drilled out. Select a drill bit just larger than the hole in the head of the rivet, place the tip of the bit in the hole and drill. You're not looking to drill straight ...


5

Your chances of success are high. I use the "bottom up" method but I use a garden hose on full blast rather than a drain auger. Do I get wet? YES Does it clear the blockage (packed in tiny leaves and sticks from a Jacaranda tree) every time? YES


5

You will need: 1 - Rivets or screws. I would recommend rivets for aluminum gutter 2 - An outlet for the new downspout, if you can't reuse the old one 3 - A piece of metal slightly bigger than the width of your downspout 4 - Aviation snips, if you currently don't own any 5 - Gutter sealer or solder bars 6 - A new downspout, if needed 7 - As tester101 ...


4

Short term: Buy an elbow, cut the downspout and run a 15 foot gutter away from the house. Long term: Get a drain specialist in to snake it out and fix the problem.


4

If you want to repair the leaking pipe where it enters the foundation, I'd use hydraulic cement to seal it. As for the downspout into the cast iron pipe, there are transition pieces that should tie them together more cleanly and tightly - or you could fashion something from ABS or PVC sewer pipe/fittings and downspout fittings. Otherwise, my thought on this ...


3

This isn't a downspout problem, this is a grading problem. The ground has either eroded over time or was never properly graded in the first place. Probably a combination. Either way, the end result is that water collects in the low places and only dissipates by absorbing into the ground (not good; that can cause foundation problems like liquefaction of the ...


3

This type of pipe and fitting is meant for burial and is not made to seal. The pop-together fittings just ensure the pipe stays together, not leak free. If you want water tight sealing on the joints, you need to use PVC thinwall sewer/gutter drain pipe. It will have the same adapters so you can get a proper water-tight seal for the sump pump drain, a nice ...


3

I'd be surprised if the pipe was crushed by a typical car. Very heavy pickups or SUVs, maybe. PVC is surprisingly tough. However, you could scrape away the gravel to the level of the pipe to a width of 8-10 inches and lay some treated two-by lumber or steel plate over the pipe, resting on the adjacent gravel. You could drive some large pole barn nails ...


3

Downspouts aren't sealed because gravity prevents much water from coming back up through the lapped connections. So if that's happening something's usually plugged. In this case, it's because of the ice blockage. If you were to seal the system you'd just move the "leak" to the gutter, and your icicles would form there instead because the entire pipe would ...


2

If you can get access to a wet/dry shop vac, you may be able to suck the gunk out.


2

Personally, I'd cut the downspout back so it is even (level with the ground), with about an inch of pipe hanging down (or as much as can be saved). Get another piece of pipe, in which the inside diameter is the same as the outside diameter of the original downspout. This will be used to replace the piece you just cut off. Before you affix your new pipe to ...


2

Honestly, I'd use nothing. The problem is if you ever remove the screw, then the hole needs to be filled. Mount the bracket high-up, tucked under a lap, so you don't buckle the siding while installing it. Check both ends of the siding for play first. Affixed in the middle with room on both sides, it should be fine. Use screws with a fully threaded shank; you'...


2

For the second question you might apply some septic dye into the old pipes. But often things get into the basement any old way, and then get trapped in the sump pit, rather than entering via the sump pit. If you have a cleanout you can look into, septic dye might also address the assumption that they connect to the sanitary sewer line at all. Perfectly ...


2

Cut the heads off using a reciprocating saw. If you do it correctly, the bracket will prevent the blade from damaging the wall.


2

We design heating cables into driveways and sidewalks for areas that can have an icy buildup and buildings that must have safe access, like medical clinics, hospitals, fire departments, etc. Also, high-end residents will often request it. Here’s a link for new or retrofit work: http://systems.warmquest.com/radiant-driveway-heating-systems/?gclid=...


2

I'm not a professional, and I have very little experience. But: Could you adjust the slope of your gutter? Currently, rain rolls north off the roof, gets to the gutter, half goes east and half goes west. If you lower the north-east corner of the gutter (and gently slope the whole gutter toward it) a majority of the rain would head down the east spout ...


2

As "D-on" suggested, the best way to go is under the concrete path. If you feel like replacing the cracked section, then pull it out, dig a trench, and extend the downspout through the trench (ductwork all the way). Alternatively, dig a trench under the concrete and cut a hole directly below the downspout in the existing slab. The drawback here is you ...


2

I suppose you'd call a plumber. You must determine if this is connected to the sanitary sewer. Also this opening should be capped with a proper cleanout fitting with a cap that would prevent sewage from pouring out, but would be removable for inspection or clearing a blockage. The plumber could run a camera down this and see where it goes. AFIK rain water ...


2

It's going to vary with design and rainfall rate. More flow means more likelihood of spillage and drop detachment, so it depends on your personal preference. Add to that the wind around your home and it's hard to say. Trial and error are the best approach.


2

Pop up emitters are a good thing that do a few jobs. They stop debris from falling back down into the pipe, but more importantly (in my area) they stop mosquitos from getting in and multiplying in the standing water. If a grate was in place, you have open access to standing water. They don't have a water-tight seal so they do not really stop water from ...


2

We have a similar two story house where we had contractors redo the gutters. They continued the downspout from the second floor over the roof of the first floor and positioned it directly into the hole in the first floor gutter. No straps were visible on the run over the first floor and it appears to be secured at the second floor downspout only. Volume ...


1

None that I know of in 'The Code', your Zoning is what determines specific buffers. However, the Rule Of Thumb around me says you can't discharge any water in the direction of your neighbor that would readily flow over the property line...no downspout extension legs directed at your neighbor. In the few States I've worked it's all the same and I wouldn't ...


1

If you are not intending to use the downspout for anything but the one purpose than just eliminate the bottom portion all together otherwise you will end up with water just filling up and stagnating in the capped off portion. Just divert the downspout with bends, 45 or 90 degree bends, to the to point your are collecting the water so there is not a bottom ...


1

I ran into the same situation on two of my own houses. I knew where the exits were, but they were long runs, with extended, packed blockage (probably never cleared). Initial attempts at clearing them with plumbing snakes and special hose nozzles didn't make much of a dent. You've got nothing to lose trying to clear the pipes. But if they have many ...


1

This is an older post but a French Drain with down facing perforated pipe is to collect (not receive) water 2'-3' underground and flow by gravity to daylight, a dry well or a storm sewer. The pipe should be surrounded by washed gravel and sometimes a filter cloth. It is not properly used for an underground roof gutter water dispersal. That should be ...


1

It's not clear what you are telling us. If the PVC is French Drain type, built with holes, then it's intended to allow water to flow in/out. If it is simply broken, then of course you should replace the broken length so it functions as designed. To determine whether it is the source of the leak, do what plumbers do: dump water with some dye mixed in down ...


1

I have covered over holes similar to this using thin aluminum sheet (and copper on copper gutters) bent to shape to fit the inside of the gutter and then pop riveted in place (after applying a little low modulus silicone sealant around the hole on the inside and along the outer edges of the repair section to stop water going in between. It does of course ...


1

In my opinion you should be good as it was for depth, moving to Sch 40 is a good upgrade, that is what the company I worked for always used under slabs and especially driveways. The main thing is that there are no low areas for water to collect and freeze. Depending on your area, it would be a hard freeze to get ground to freeze at the 12" depth, there ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible