4

To be honest, I would seriously consider replacing the door. Sometimes the "big" fix turns out to be the cheapest & easiest, particularly if the door is a typical indoor door and a standard size (or close enough that you can get a standard size door and trim it to fit). However, one possibility that might work is a door reinforcer: But (a) it ...


4

Why not use a surface-mounted cabinet twist latch: image courtesy of houseofantiquehardware.com Or, if your pup likes to open latches by biting, use a recessed slam latch: image courtesy of actronmfginc.com also called paddle-handle push-to-close latch, to protect her or his teeth? Of course, if the bin is large enough to trap a person, you do need an inside ...


3

The shim is not visible, so you could make your own shim out of cardboard -- more than one layer, if needed.


2

This type of latch can be installed with the shaft that passes between the inner and outer latches rotated out of position, if I recall correctly. Try removing the interior hardware, spinning the shaft 180°, and reinstalling.


2

Remove the handle and get a good wood glue and brush it in all the cracks. Clamp it until the glue dries (varies with the type of glue). If you can't clamp it, I'd suggest removing the door, laying it flat and weight down a piece of wood over the glues area until the glue dries. Then re attach the handle. If using epoxy, most epoxies want to be clamped or ...


2

After thinking to search specifically for Kwikset locks with this issue, I found this video referencing it. Guessing it's an issue with at least some Kwikset knobs. Thanks for the helpful comments. https://youtu.be/skME0j8hsOM ETA: at least some Kwikset knobs have these two metal nubs or dimples on them. The video's solution was to use a course metal nail ...


1

Looks like you could pry off the collar using the little flat tab on the right side of it. On a security lock you could not do this but this is a privacy lock and usually you can. Then maybe you'll have access to grab that button with pliers or to unlock the door some other way. Sometimes on a privacy lock like this the knob itself can be pried off this way ...


1

If the latching mechanism is adjustable, then just a few washers behind that plate will bring it out. Your home store will also have shim sets. If the latching mechanism isn't adjustable and can't be moved out, then you have to find a round hole strike plate that will fit over your "latch plate" to fill in the space. You'll need something like the ...


1

You have to turn the inner handle until you see a small depression of metal. That is what you push into and pull the handle.


1

The easiest way is to block the hole in the door jam that the latch goes into (I honestly have no idea what this is called). One way would be to put a strip of tape (probably blue painter’s tape) across it. Another way is to cut a piece of something to fit inside the hole which can easily be removed later (back in high school, I witnessed a classmate use a ...


1

Change the lock to either a magnetic one - which will always open with a push or pull or a spring-loaded roller one that will do the same.


1

Those bumps are designed to dimple the door surface and hold position. A common problem with door hardware is that it slides around in its bore after a while, damaging the finish and feeling sloppy. Tighten the mounting screws adequately to pull the knob tight to the door face. Unless you have some sort of bomb-proof, heavy duty door, it shouldn't be ...


1

You will never be able to repair the door so it will look undamaged. Here are a couple of suggestions to repair the door so the repair isn't obvious: If you used a hole saw and saved the door chunk that was drilled out find how it was oriented in the door. next lay the door on a flat surface. apply tape over the opening on the inside face of the door. Remove ...


1

Unfortunately,you found a drill. It looks like you used a hole saw so if you have a set, use the next larger size and cut a plug from a piece of wood the same thickness and file it down to fit in the hole. Use wood filler to fill in the rest. If you have a jig saw, trace the hole on a piece of wood and cut it out and glue it into the hole. Last resort would ...


1

One other solution is to "simply" add a lock, ignoring the details of the current doorknob. The padlock is actually dubious or an actual code violation, and the lock you choose to add should be releasable from inside the closet (which is why that's probably a code violation - locking people in closets is not safe.) It may be a "not uncommon&...


1

I can't tell what the existing backset (distance from front-side edge of door to center of knob shaft) is, but you can buy mortise locksets that lock. A bit of chisel work would expand the existing mortise. I shudder to offer this link, but as an example of widely available things, mortise lockset The linked one appears to have a 2-1/2" backset. I'd ...


1

The mechanism for the bolt to retract in the opposite direction is separate, and it may have failed. If you want both directions to work, it is a lot more complicated and is typically specific to that design, so a DIY method of fixing it may not be available. However, some can be configured and it is a matter of setting a component inside, like a switch or ...


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