50

See the lock insides? That's a metal sleeve, with an inside sliding piece. That inside sliding piece is connected to the latch bolt. Push it to the left, and voila! Some additional details. This is what you see when you remove the knobs, shaft and escutcheons from a knob set. The central shaft, which is has a flat, vertical cross-section, goes through that ...


33

I'd glue and clamp the wood to put it back together, then install a door reinforcement plate. Interior doors are usually 1-3/8" thick. Exterior are 1-3/4" thick.


29

It‘s interesting how these things differ among cultures! In Europe (Germany for sure, but I never observed a difference in other European countries) basically all doors have levers. Here you install a knob only when you need the feature that it becomes more difficult open a door for pets and toddlers. However, in most of these cases you can already get ...


27

In my experience, and in general terms... Knobs are: Familiar (in the U.S) Low-profile (more compact horizontally) Funcional with ambidexterity/symmetry/bidirectionality (operate the same from any side--some levers only function downward) Non-snagging (and slightly more secure for this reason) Less expensive due to production cost and/or sales volume ...


12

There's a C-shaped piece in the hole through the bolt near the right (inner) end. Press one leg of that toward the edge of the door (the latch). Normally there's a formed sheet metal shaft with an opposing C shape going through there that rotates and does just that.


10

My wife and I moved into a home with lever door handles. One big downside was our young children, who instantly knew how to open them and escape. You can't childproof these easily either (they have devices, they just don't work as well).


9

Remove the pins from the hinges. You should then be able to pivot the door out of the opening. Once the door is removed you can remove the screws that hold in the strike bolt.


9

You should be able to trip the latch, if you can see what you say you see - there should be something coming from the latch side which can be pulled or manipulated (often rotated, as that's what the knob would do) to do that. If the hardware is really fouled up, a slim prybar next to the latch between the door and frame will often find enough flex in the ...


7

Try #2: Cyanoacrylate This worked much better. The local hardwood distributor recommended and carries super thin "super glue". Turn the knob in the usual direction to set it tight, then apply glue to the glass/metal junction (it will wick right inside). Keep acetone handy in case you dribble. Scrape excess off with a small screwdriver. Done. What will ...


7

Lacking any regular tools, a pair of scissors works great. Open up the scissors to a cross, and push one blade all the way into the hole in the metal part then turn. You can use the other handle as a lever if it is tight. Hey presto, she be open. DISCLAIMER: Do not cut yourself or run with this tool, or use your spouse's good tailoring scissors.


7

I wouldn't. I'd spend 20 bucks at Restore, or free from used_your_city_name_here.com, craigslist, or whatever your local buy-sell-trade site is. This is repairable, but all repairs are a trade off of effort vs results. Used doors in good condition can be had for free or nearly free. The "proper", lasting, way to repair this would be to cut out and replace ...


6

According to the International Building Code, door knobs should be between 34" - 48" above the finished floor. International Building Code 2012 Chapter 10 Means of Egress Section 1008 Doors, Gates and Turnstiles 1008.1.9.2 Hardware height. Door handles, pulls, latches, locks and other operating devices shall be installed 34 inches (864 mm) minimum ...


6

The one mayor hidden disadvantage is that they need a spring to keep the lever/handle in horizontal position. I found after moving to a 20 years old house that some of them were not horizontal, but in a falling/diagonal position. They didn't latch the door, and don't look nice, as can be seen at the begining of this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...


6

To add another bullet point to supplement the other good answers: While most exterior doors are pretty close to air tight and security is generally not a concern for interior doors, locks on lever-type handles are typically easy to bypass if there is any sort of gap at the bottom of the door (typical of interior doors). This can be a benefit if you know and ...


6

I've gotten my pocket/belt loops caught in the handle when maneuvering around doors. Have tripped myself/destroyed belt loops this way. EXAMPLE!


6

I would vastly prefer to do them hung. As far as just attaching the hardware, that job is a cakewalk when the door is hung. Doing it while the door is on sawhorses only creates a handling problem; the doorknob will be awkward. If holes need to be drilled for the knob, latch and strike, then trying to do that separately using measurements would be ...


6

It looks like there is a threaded collar screwing through from one side to the other. I think if you use a small screwdriver / punch to undo it (as arrowed), this will release the two halves:


5

There's a pivot joint in the middle of the knob shaft which lets the two ends rotate relative to each other. You need to get things lined up so each end of the shaft engages just its side of the lockset. That may take some experimentation to get the amount screwed into each of the knobs just right to balance this out, though the cross-pin should help you ...


5

I've been going through a similar process for a door I'm turning round. After removing everything that I'm moving, my process has been: Give the full door a good sanding Glue and clamp all cracked/split wood Sand the door Cut new wood to fill the larger holes (old key hole etc, making sure it is slightly smaller than the hole, so nothing is proud of the ...


4

Use your ADA manual fella's. The upward curve on the handle end could get hung up on a disabled person's cuff, clothing, wrist watch, hand bag, etc. Usually not much of a big deal, right? Unill the building is on fire or a natural disaster, earthquake. Anything can happen in race for life. ADA people need all the help they can get in a calamity, residential, ...


4

If you just want the bathroom door held closed, remove the latch mechanism totally, install a dummy knob and use a magnetic closure to hold the door in place. You do not even need the magnet to touch the matched plate on the stronger ones. If you are using a bit of foam or a vinyl bumper on the door itself, adjust the magnet back from the plate until it is ...


4

Try #1: Liquefied MDI adhesive. For my first attempt I assembled hot water, a thermometer, glue, Diphenylmethane Diisocyanate (MDI) glue, and a straw. The MDI is a thick glue, so the trick was making it thin enough without creating toxic fumes: Used a straw to extend the tip of the glue bottle. Heated water to 120F to liquefy the glue in the bottle. ...


4

One disadvantage of using levers is mentioned in this article in The Economist - they may be more easily opened by bears (and velociraptors). True, elderly and disabled people find it easier to operate doors with handles. But so do bears. In British Columbia, bears have been known to scavenge for food inside cars—whose doors have handles, knob ...


4

Lever doorknobs are now mandated by the ADA (Velociraptors with Disabilities Act) because they are much easier to operate for people with poor motor skills (or very short arms). That's why they are practically universal in commercial buildings. Keep in mind ADA is not a "fist of God" requirement, and the primary doctrine of ADA is "readily achievable", or ...


4

I see bits in there that you should be able to catch with a screwdriver and slide to the right. Next time, use a passage lockset intended for closets (which has no locking feature at all) or a privacy lockset intended for bathrooms (which is unlocked with a simple hole in the center of the knob that you jab with a skewer).


4

I had a similar problem. I needed to go from a 2" hole to a 1" hole. I got a 2 1/4" hole saw and cut a hole through a piece of wood the same thickness as the door. I took the plug from the hole saw and glued it into the hole in the door. Sanded it, filled it in with a little wood putty and then drilled my 1" hole. Might be a little more work than you want to ...


4

They are standardized! Your door is the standard! The doorknob is wrong. The people selling it to you should have had this conversation with you, and warned you that it probably won't fit your door. Take it back, let them learn their lesson.


4

To be honest, I would seriously consider replacing the door. Sometimes the "big" fix turns out to be the cheapest & easiest, particularly if the door is a typical indoor door and a standard size (or close enough that you can get a standard size door and trim it to fit). However, one possibility that might work is a door reinforcer: But (a) it ...


4

Why not use a surface-mounted cabinet twist latch: image courtesy of houseofantiquehardware.com Or, if your pup likes to open latches by biting, use a recessed slam latch: image courtesy of actronmfginc.com also called paddle-handle push-to-close latch, to protect her or his teeth? Of course, if the bin is large enough to trap a person, you do need an inside ...


3

If you look at the palm of your hand, you will see that it is concave. Generally you therefore want the majority of the handle to have middle of the curve up, ends of the curve down. In the top handle it is clear that this has been done. In the bottom handle it is less clear, as the majority of the handle seems to be flat. What curves there are at the end ...


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