New answers tagged

0

Epoxy instead of wood glue irrespective of any hole filling method you use. If this is for oak door hinges, I find it hard to understand why you cannot dowel? (The dowels are hidden underneath the hinge plates).


0

I've occasionally seen toothpick style repairs and never been highly impressed with them. It kinda works, and it's cheap and easy, but the wood a toothpick is made of is nothing like your oak base material. Even with wood glue to help hold it in place the toothpick wood is still soft. A technique I've recently read about, but haven't yet tried myself, is to ...


0

Toothpicks. As I've previously answered here Slightly different question, so not a duplicate. But answer is the same.


2

I have used tooth picks and matches with glue for many years. With hard wood I use toothpicks as they are hard, match sticks with the head cut off work will work but I use those on soft wood like pine. I squirt the wood glue in push in however many I think I need then wipe the excess and insert the screws


2

Out of the three listed options I would use #3 as it is closest to the dowel method. I would also use longer screws if possible so that if only part of the hole is stripped the extra length can get more grip.


1

I would go for the dowel method. Support the door, move that face of the hinge out of the way, drill, and fit dowel with glue. Let dry, pilot drill and then use good screws.


2

It is not worth it. Based on a ton of factors the hinge position is very very unlikely to line up right. External doors are all over the place on this and you don't want to be chiseling/routing your jamb and if going steel this isn't an option on the door. This doesn't even get into a 34" door is sometime 33 7/8" or that the door is a hair wider or ...


0

You certainly can. Here are a few potential issues to watch for: Slab width: A too-small door will make fitting weatherstripping a problem and will keep the latch(es) from engaging properly. Confirm size to within 1/32". Some variation can be overcome by adjusting the set of the jamb with shims, but that would probably require removing some trim. Hinge ...


1

I did something similar with a stucco house I owned where I closed in a window opening to create a shower. I framed in the wall with and installed rough-sawn cedar plywood. The texture coordinated with the stucco nicely. You don't want to install the plywood flush with the stucco. It'll look like a bad patch. You want it set back a bit like it's a design ...


4

That's common practice. As long as the framing member is rigidly attached it doesn't really matter what other function it serves or what it's called. (Jester stud?)


Top 50 recent answers are included