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31

Wood glue, hands down. Wood glue is designed to penetrate the wood for a tighter bond. Properly done, wood glue is stronger than the surrounding wood. I have chairs I've wood glued and clamped and they're still fine years later. Epoxy is OK, but you have to make sure you get the right epoxy too. Many are exothermic (they get hot) and might eat your wood. ...


28

You should drill out the hole with a large drill bit and glue in a wooden plug. Then you can drill a pilot hole into that and screw the bracket into that. Toothpicks will work in the short term but if they are not glued then they will pull out pretty soon. Drilling out the chewed out wood and glueing in a plug will create a new place for screws to bite into....


23

Looks like they used rivets. The only way to remove them, is to destroy them (drill them out).


20

I might get barked at for suggesting this, but take toothpicks and jam them into the holes - as many as you can. Then just break them off so it's flush with everything else. I've done it before and it really works. When you're screwing it back in, the toothpicks will get caught in the threads and actually create a tight seal. I wouldn't recommend using ...


14

In order of my personal preference: Option 1: Go Go Gadget Screws Get longer screws that reach the framing. Don't run them in so tight as to pull the jamb out of position. All-thread screws might bite into the jamb somewhat to prevent movement. Option 2: A Square Peg in a Round Hole Fill the holes with wood glue and tap in wood "dowels" shaved from a ...


13

Properly installed, at least some of the screws should go thru frame and into studs. The short screws are mostly there to keep everything aligned while a pre-hung door-and-frame set is assembled and shipped. Once it has been hung and shimmed properly, those screws can be replaced with better ones... but aren't always.


13

You could just chill out. Putting up bars or plastic on that door is truly ghetto. Doors like this are not inherently unsafe at all. Your door is appropriate for your neighborhood. Your door would be unsafe or inappropriate for a bad neighborhood or an apartment building. Having this glass probably does not effect your chances of burglary by ....


11

My two cents worth..... We always install the base trim and door trim first. If you have split jam doors with the casings already attached, you must install them first or you will have a real problem fitting the jams to the floor between rooms. As mentioned, sometimes the carpet installers can scratch the finish on the baseboards, however it is usually ...


11

It makes it easier for the carpet installer because they don't have the baseboards in the way when they're nailing in the tack strips next to the wall. On the other hand, it makes things a little more difficult to install the baseboard later because the carpet and tack strips are in the way when you're trying to nail the baseboard to the sole plate in the ...


11

You could consider attaching a thick acrylic or other plastic panel that covers the interior of the glass and is firmly screwed to the door. The edges can then be covered with molding. Such plastics are shatter resistant. While they can be broken, they will not yield to the tools of most casual home intruders (unless they carry sledge hammers or blow ...


11

Those look like rivets to me. You can simply drill the rivets out to release the hinge, however reinstalling the door could be complicated. A simple solution is to drive out the swivel pin from the center of the hinge. Look under the bottom of the center swivel joint. There you should find a hole into which you can insert a 16 penny nail or equivalent. ...


10

If this is the spring for a screen door, which is looks like, try just moving the bracket up or down 1/4" or so. There's usually enough slop in those things that you can do it, and you'll have new wood to screw into.


8

I guess you could try putting some thin foam or felt stick on pads on the inside of the door frame where the door contacts it. This should lower the sound of the wood to wood contact. If the knob hardware is also loud, try using some dry silicon spray lubricant on the moving parts and on the door hinges. Sleep well.....


8

Called 'pop' rivets in the UK, also 'blind' rivets, since you don't have to have access to the other side on the part receiving the rivet. Be careful drilling out, as the centre pin is steel, and the rivet is aluminium. If you drill out too large, and wish to use the same holes, you can have problems finding a suitable replacement. 1/8" is a common size, but ...


7

First of all, some terminology. What you want to replace is called the JAMB. You can either replace the whole thing (prefered) or try and fit a smaller piece in to fix the broken area. With a utility knife, score the paint on both sides of the STOP (The thin piece that stops the door when it is closed. Pry it off with a small prybar, slot screw driver ...


7

Bifold rough openings: to the hinge (pivot ) side add 3/4", to the other other side, 1/4" So for single 24" wide door, a 25" RO (which is really a finished opening for bifolds) is needed. You need a bit more clearance on the pivot side, because the pivot is inboard a bit and it needs clearance to swing through (pivot around) the thickness of the door. ...


7

Short of reframing the door, I'd suggest taking a belt sander to the side of the door that sticks.


7

I would try applying some wood glue into the split with a small brush. Sandwich the door between two 2x4's with some clamps. It may help to put some wax paper on the 2x4 to keep any glue from adhering the board to the door. Tighten the clamps until the glue starts to squeeze from the crack. Let it sit 24 hours, remove the clamps and scrape any excess dried ...


7

Not worth the time and effort. Replace the door.


7

Filling the holes with tooth picks is good for restoring the wood for screws that don't go through too much stress. I would definitely use glue when going that route. The issue here is, the wood of the jamb did not withstand the stresses that was given it. Although the toothpicks are a good fix, it is still not quite as strong as the original wood, and if ...


6

There's no such thing as US building codes, there are state, county, and municipal codes which vary widely between areas. The only way to know is to ask, which is what I'd recommend you do. There's no harm in it, simply call the office that is responsible and ask. You don't have to say you've already done it if you're worried about it, you could say you are ...


6

From International Residential Code, your local planning department is the final authority on what may or may not be done after inspecting what modifications you are intending to do. This is a job that requires a permit and consultation with an experienced contractor. R802.7.1 Sawn lumber. Notches in solid lumber joists, rafters, blocking and beams shall ...


6

The reason for a rough opening is so that it CAN be rough in dimensions. Your opening should be no problem. Rough openings are made larger to accommodate headers and floors than out of level, adjacent studs that may be out of plumb, framing lumber that has thickness variations, openings that are slightly out of square and maybe some other things I've not ...


6

A (usually) reversible way to remove a door is to drive out the hinge pins. Pry off the bottom caps and then from below insert a "drift" or a large nail and tap with a hammer. Before prying off the bottom caps try inserting a thin drift into the hole in the bottom and pushing the hinge pin up far enough that you can get screwdriver on the underside of the ...


6

Wood glue, always. Sandpaper the dowel and hole to give a better surface for the glue to hold.


5

You should definitely not cut those beams! They are massive because they carry the load of whatever is above you. If you want to modify the structure to carry that weight elsewhere, that is possible but you will need to get help from someone who knows how to safely modify structure and you will need a building permit. I'm guessing that sort of cost and ...


5

The closet doors are most likely listed in actual finished opening size. However it is a good idea to use a tape measure to check 100% for sure. Some doors are made a little oversize to allow trimming into final size for the specified opening size. Other doors may very well be made a small amount undersize to allow for the necessary clearances needed for a ...


5

While local codes certainly vary, in general there's nothing wrong that I know of with that installation. Your door is not on the stairs, it's in the hall.


5

The short answer is longer screws, plus some glue. There should be plenty of extra room for longer screws on both the door and the jamb. If the hinges are brass, solid brass screws are best. Pre-drill. At the same time stick in a small strip of wood soaked in wood glue into each hole just to be sure. Toothpicks, chopsticks or similar dry wood work well. ...


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