New answers tagged

1

I agree with the above. Still, it might be easier to hard-wire, similar to old DW. To check if you can do this, tip the new one to the side and trace how its power cord terminates. I'd bet it has the same 3 screws (usually located behind the front kick panel - so it is easy to reach when installing or removing). Then all you have to do is: release the ...


5

I think your methodology is sound. You want to make sure the plug and outlet is accessible so putting it under the sink is the way to go. When you mount it be sure to secure it to a stud and away from anywhere that could be exposed to water. This means away from the shutoff valves and not directly under the sink supply connections. Cable straps will hold the ...


3

You pretty much "got it right". Whether you are required to use a GFCI or not is often the requirements of the local code and which code version is being enforced. I don't believe a GFCI is required for a DW in the 2017 code. But if you wanted to be extra safe, it can't hurt to install one. You may get nuisance trips.


0

It sounds like there's a plumbing problem. berhaps there's a blockages somewhere inside the dishwasher, or perhaps the pump is malfunctioning. Start by checking all the easily accessable filters. If you haven't tried it yet run a cycle with dishwasher cleaner. equally it could be a defective sensor causing the cycle to pause or even skip steps.


1

Per the manual, It is normal for dishwasher to pause (no sound) when the wash action is switching between the lower and middle spray arms but 17+ hours, yeah, somethings wrong. Hard to troubleshoot, could be the computer in the panel, some sensor. I think you need to get it serviced


4

I had this happen on two different machines. I was able to just use some crazy glue on the one because I had the parts. The other occasion I was missing the parts so I took the spring from a switch on the machine that I never used.. I think it was the "quick rinse" button. If you can't swap out the spring maybe you can swap out the switch or swap the ...


2

Those are called "push nuts" and they can be quite difficult to remove. I've been most successful by inserting a thin screwdriver underneath the nut and gently prying up as you work your way around. Alternatively, you can try to snap the nut by prying up an edge and then using a pair of needle-nose pliers to twist the edge until it breaks. Another ...


0

Troubleshoot and eliminate the most unlikely, bearing in mind that the more assumptions you have to make, the less likely it is the root cause (Occam's razor). the pump does not run during filling, so scratch that the only "active" component during filling, normally, is electrically controlled fill valve. a high-pitched squeal or whistle is very commonly ...


1

Not sure why you are fixated on your dishwasher but according to Google the average dishwasher uses about 6 gallons per cycle so this is really just a math problem. 6 gallons x 4 cycles per day x 30 days = 720 gallons I don't know if 4 cycles is normal for one day but even if you doubled that then you are still well below the quoted 55,000 gallons. There'...


0

There are Apps showing frequency spectra, e.g. spectroid. Taking screen shots of the spectrum when the (main) water valve is unchanged and when the throughput is reduced helps to find out if the problem is in the water flow or in electrical parts. A 2nd person turning the valve while watching the spectrum to check if and how the frequency changes can give a ...


3

To me it sounds like a leak. A dishwasher once take for the wash load (around 10L) just recycles it, then take another 10L for the rinse and for any additional rinse. (usually it takes less than 50L). In my opinion is a hidden leak (like a buried pipe) or just a toilet stuck flushing or with a worn gasket. In my case the high bill (100 m^3 excess over some ...


1

Is the dishwasher nameplate actually 15A or is that just the required maximum protection? If the dishwasher and 125% of the disposal nameplate total less than the circuit breaker you can make it work. (Most motors require 125%.) The 50% rule doesn't apply, the Code says: NEC 210.23(A)(2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place ...shall not exceed 50%......


3

Do you have access to the water meter? Here in Australia we have meters which have a counter on them a bit like the odometer on an older car. The faster the right most dial spins the faster the flow through it. Turn everything off and watch how fast it spins. With everything off it shouldn't move unless there's a leak somewhere.


35

This is NOT intended use It's way too much water for any intended use. To give you an idea, the last time I saw a $700 bill, it was from a toilet at a rarely-used facility, which had a stuck float. The valve was wide open 24x7 for 2 months. That's the kind of flow we're talking about. For a dishwasher to have that much flow, it would have to be ...


0

I don't mean this as a complete answer but what I would do to start. I'm assuming you've done the obvious like checking the supply line and shutoff valve for obstructions from calcification, etc. The problem is almost certainly in the water supply system. If the external supply line is good to go then you need to go under the hood. Usually that type of sound ...


6

If the undersink cabinet has a door, you don't need GFCI as of 2017 in letter. That from the horse's mouth. You also don't need it in spirit if the appliances are hardwired and grounded. Here's what I see. Dishwashers are a heavy draw because they heat water or dishes (to dry them). As such, the dishwasher takes more than 50% of circuit capacity and ...


15

To just answer your question about how much water your dishwasher uses, unhook the drain tubing for the DW and stick it into a big bucket so you can catch the water as it drains out. You might need two buckets, one for wash and one for rinse. The drain tubing disconnect easily from a trap or the disposal. Once you get all the water in buckets, just scoop it ...


6

that is a very large water bill. This size of leak could easily be in the pipes in the ground before they reach the units and after the meter. To test, turn off all the water outlets (normal situation & without any dishwashers or clothes washers running). Check your meter to see if its running or not. If not obviously running, record the value and come ...


20

First, it's almost certainly not the fault of your dishwasher. A dishwasher has to physically pump the water out of it, and they really only hold enough water to fill the bottom. If it started to fill completely, the water would leak out all over the floor - the seals are not designed to hold back that kind of pressure. The problem is most likely a leak ...


0

check for a leak. Make sure all tennants (how many?) are not using water and see if the water meter is still spinning. Sounds like a leak to me.


2

It's always better to have the dishwasher and disposal on a separate circuit but it's usually not required by code as long as the total load combined is within the range of the 20 amp circuit. I would first check to see if there is a separate 20 amp available in either box or as JACK suggested - maybe the purple wire can supply a separate circuit for you. ...


0

I'm guessing the supply from the panel has an extra wire in it, purple, that was intended for a disposal in the future. Check you panel to see if the purple is connected to a breaker or just hanging there. If it needs a breaker, install one based on the wire size. At the box, remove the switch and fuse and install a GFIC outlet for the washer on one circuit ...


2

This is one of those "kinda, sorta" questions. Lots of considerations. Current code requires that any "fastened in place" appliances (garbage disposal & DW are considered "fastened in place") power requirements not exceed 50% of the rating of the circuit if that circuit also supplies outlets. A high horse power disposal could have a name plate amp ...


1

No, combining the ground will not render the GFCI useless. Just imagine for a minute any metal j-box, or any metal stud construction building, all those grounds become interconnected through the yokes of the receptacles. A GFCI receptacle doesn't use the ground to function, it is required to be grounded if a ground is present, but notice if you look at the ...


3

It's the neutrals you need to firewall GFCI and DFCI devices simply do not care about ground. (Note how a GFCI breaker has no ground connection -- it has line-hot, line-neutral, load-hot, and load-neutral, and that's all!) In fact, one could pull two hots and two neutrals through an EMT conduit to a metal box, thus having a single ground path all the way ...


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