32

You're looking at the problem upside down. You are thinking the smart bulbs are causing it. Actually, the Lutron Caseta dimmer is causing it. The smart bulbs are behaving normally, however their normal behavior is breaking the dimmer. The dimmer can't deal with four smart bulbs downline of it because (very typically) the dimmer doesn't have a neutral and ...


26

There is no need for tape inside a device box except perhaps as a wire colour marker (phase taping, etc). Outlets, switches, device boxes, cable, clamps, breakers - all of these devices have clear and specific installation methods that ensure they perform to the safety standards against which they are tested. Hacks like this do not count themselves among ...


20

Using the hole(s) in the back is called a "back stab", and, while technically code-legal, they're frowned upon because they can come loose and cause arcing and, if left alone long enough, fires. The side screws are actually the preferred method and are applicable for either 12 or 14 gauge wire. However, the way you've done it is missing on 2 points:...


12

If you are going to do it you go 3-4 times around the outlet so it covers the metal and doesn't slip off. Also do not use the cheapo stuff that comes in at $2 for 5 rolls. This shouldn't be a common thing. I do it only when using smaller metal boxes and the side screws are very close to the edge or touching to prevent arcing. If you are leaving too ...


10

Yes, I see several problems. Wire just stuck under a screw, and not using a proper shepherd's hook with a more than 180 degree bend (i.e. squeezing it together after forming it. Watch a Youtube video on how to put a wire on a screw. Insulation excessively stripped, leaving bare bits of wire sticking out beyond the back surface of the switch. Not OK. ...


8

From the link you posted: The dimmer is rated for up to 210W of halogens with or without transformer. So if you have 6x 20W 12V halogen bulbs, total 120W, it's okay. You should check the power on the bulbs to make sure they're not 50W halogen bulbs, in which case it would exceed the rated power of the dimmer, although 12V 50W are pretty rare. When your ...


6

Cost, mostly Whether your grounding conductors are bare, insulated, or not even a wire to begin with depends on what wiring method you are working with. NM, because it's made in large quantities, uses a bare grounding wire to save cost (likewise with UF and most SE cables, as those pennies add up at industrial scales). On the other hand, if your house is ...


4

No tape in permanent installations! Tape glue. No matter how much reputable and expensive the tape brand is, there is always a possibility for the glue to become either liquid, or dust-like, or electrically conductive over time. Yes, I have seen all these things more than once, including all of them at once. Cooling. Every conductor heats under load and it ...


4

The backstab wire is a continuation of the hot ,black, wire probably to or from an outlet or main panel, Just wire nut it to the black wire from the screw terminal right next to it and the black wire from your dimmer. The exposed bare copper wire is the ground wire. The white, neutral, wire normally isn't needed when wiring regular dimmers or regular ...


4

Grounds should NEVER be connected to neutrals, except once, at the main panel. This should be separated. Then there will be two possible outcomes: (1) everything works fine (or) (2) things stop working. What this means is that somewhere, a neutral back to the panel is broken and someone hacked it to work by bootlegging the ground as neutral. I suspect the ...


4

Yes it can and it is the best way to do it. Those holes in the back are commonly called backstabs and have a long history of failing. After you turn off the power, you can remove those wires by sticking a small screwdriver into the slot next to each hole and pulling the wire. You can also hold the wire and twist the switch back and forth while pulling the ...


4

IMPE, it's virtually guaranteed that the dimmer is the cause. I opted to get LED dimmers, because the LED units I got were dimmable. "Why not?" The nasty bits not mentioned: include does not go to full brightness, at least 1/2 second perceptible delay (at full brightness) with my dimmer/lights combination (.vs. normal instant with a normal switch) ...


3

Electricians look at tape wrapped around switches, receptacles, and wire nuts as an amateur tell. I agree it's a bad idea around a wire nut, but I am in the minority that feel it's a good idea around device screws. If someone ever wants to remove the device from an energized box - which there's very, very seldom a good reason to do - who ever takes it out ...


3

You're supposed to resolve that with technique First, if you're working in a metal box, there shouldn't be any ground wires flying around in a switch box. Code requires that you take the cable grounds to the metal box itself FIRST -- either via separate ground screws for each, or pigtail them to one ground screw. Switches can pick up ground via their ...


3

Achievement Unlocked: Wire a box with 6 different wire functions without using any phase tape Sorry, no points for that "achievement", just a lot of brain pain. Let's try this. Ah, suddenly I can hear myself think Most of this looks pretty straight forward. The top /3 cable is the supply side of a 3-way circuit. The bottom /3 cable supplies ...


3

A "regular" dimmer, when used on a fan, will slow the fan to whatever setting is selected. This is awesome except for the fact that most settings will set up a very unpleasant harmonic thrumming sound. That's why a "fan speed controller" will have 3 distinct settings on it that match precisely with the 3 distinct settings you get by ...


3

I have an existing standard light switch that controls a single outlet. I would like to replace the switch with a dimmer switch. You can't It is a code violation to put a dimmer on a receptacle. Because, you (or the next guy) could plug any appliance in there, and some appliances like to burst into flame when dimmed. If you really, really have to do it, ...


3

Many, but probably not all, dimmers will come with an adjustment to set the "minimum" dimming level. Simply remove the cover plate from the outlets (safe to do with the power on, just don't stick your screwdriver past the face of the switches and poke around in the back of the box) and you should see a (very) little lever or perhaps a plastic screw ...


3

Blue insulation does not mean that it's a neutral wire. It might be neutral, but it's not necessarily, and is almost certainly not neutral if it's connected to a switch - light switches don't (normally) switch neutral. So what you have with your single switch is a "switch loop". The power comes to that light up in the ceiling, then a pair of wires ...


3

Yes, because one of the neutrals shares a cable with a hot that is going to the switch. (If all the neutrals went into cables unrelated to this switch, then no... that can happen in a switch loop.) The cheapest wire to get is THHN individual wires, they sell solid or stranded. Solid is the safe bet - stranded is illegal on backstabs and very hard to ...


2

This is not a simple light fixture. It uses a TRANSFORMER. Dimmers are tricky devices. While conceptually they adjust the incoming current with a variable resistance, in reality they are far more complex. The end result is that for direct use with incandescent & halogen bulbs, all dimmers work well. For use with dimmer-compatible (some are, some are not) ...


2

Don't experiment. The first rule of electrical for novices is don't experiment. Don't just toss wires around hoping for a positive outcome. The reason is simple: lots of combinations will work, but will kill you. So stopping at the first one "that works" is Russian Roulette. Nothing should be done without knowledge or reasonable expectation. ...


2

The remote shut-off requirement may cause you to choose between two problems: While the remote shut-off is activated the lights can't be turned on locally. Must walk to the remote location and re-enable. or, by using the 3-way as you've drawn, the lights can always be turned on locally -- but you can't tell whether they're on or off from the remote location!...


2

You do not need a three way dimmer. The dimmer you have will work fine. Your existing switch is a single toggle switch. It's confusing because you have a black wire connected to a screw terminal and a black wire shoved into a backstab,(which is the same connection as the screw terminal). With the breaker "off" take the two black wires from your ...


2

TL;DR Your Dimmers are Not Compatible with the Bulbs Older dimmers don't work with most LED lights. Period. Many newer dimmers work together with newer "Dimmer Compatible" bulbs (as yours are listed). There are even some dimmers available today that are not LED-compatible, and 2013 or older dimmers are very likely to be not LED-compatible. That ...


2

There are completed instructions on the web. You will have to use the white jumper included with the switch or get a 6" piece of white #14 AWG and connect it to the two white wired in the box and then connect the other end to the neutral terminal on the switch. Read your complete instructions, especially #10 under the "wire strip lengths". ...


2

Dimming LEDs (using existing fixtures and wiring) is an extremely ugly hack. It uses triac dimming, a 1960s technology chosen because it is cheap to implement for incandescent bulbs only, and their peculiar characteristics. For LED screw-in bulbs don't want to work with this technology at all; it is incompatible with what they are. However, some LED ...


2

Here's what I did: I went to a certain big box store known for its 'Treasure Hunt' atmosphere and, pre-pandemic, free samples I bought a 'feit electric dimmer switch 2 pack' I installed them. It was really easy, though it does require a neutral. I purchased the a large box of 'feit electric soft white led dimmable bulbs. The new ones light up to the ...


2

You don't need to do anything. The switch will pick up ground via the screw heads of the mounting screws. (this "via the screw heads" trick does NOT work for receptacles). If you really want to attach the ground wire, then find the screw hole in the back of the box that is tapped 10-32. That is specifically for a ground screw. You can't use ...


2

Do LED’s require special dimmers, It depends, with 9 lights there is probably enough of a load to operate properly (especially if they have worked fine for 2 years). If there was no glowing when turned off and flicker when new the lights are probably failing. All the lights are in parallel so if they are all of a sudden operating at different light levels ...


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