20

Using the hole(s) in the back is called a "back stab", and, while technically code-legal, they're frowned upon because they can come loose and cause arcing and, if left alone long enough, fires. The side screws are actually the preferred method and are applicable for either 12 or 14 gauge wire. However, the way you've done it is missing on 2 points:...


10

Yes, I see several problems. Wire just stuck under a screw, and not using a proper shepherd's hook with a more than 180 degree bend (i.e. squeezing it together after forming it. Watch a Youtube video on how to put a wire on a screw. Insulation excessively stripped, leaving bare bits of wire sticking out beyond the back surface of the switch. Not OK. ...


4

Yes it can and it is the best way to do it. Those holes in the back are commonly called backstabs and have a long history of failing. After you turn off the power, you can remove those wires by sticking a small screwdriver into the slot next to each hole and pulling the wire. You can also hold the wire and twist the switch back and forth while pulling the ...


3

Yes, because one of the neutrals shares a cable with a hot that is going to the switch. (If all the neutrals went into cables unrelated to this switch, then no... that can happen in a switch loop.) The cheapest wire to get is THHN individual wires, they sell solid or stranded. Solid is the safe bet - stranded is illegal on backstabs and very hard to ...


2

You're fine, don't worry about it The reason why people say "don't connect a dimmer to a ceiling fan" is as you suspect -- they're talking about hooking a dimmer up to a ceiling fan's motor, which makes for both an unhappy dimmer and an unhappy motor. (You need a special fan speed controller instead.) With separate hots to the fan and light, as ...


2

The light switch wiring itself is straightforward What you have for the two lightswitches is a straightforward 3-way setup with power entering and exiting at the same box. Installing the main smart dimmer in place of switch C and the remote in place of switch A shouldn't be a challenge, since you have separate hot wires for the fan and light running up from ...


1

In this case you will need to do as you suspected. This is a smart switch and needs power for its smarts and therefore needs a complete circuit. A normal switch doesn't need power for itself, it just passes power through (on) or interrupts power (off) using just the black wire (normally). Make sure you get the correct size wire. In your case it is most ...


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