6

It's called a "Thumb Turn Cover", "Door Latch Guard", or "Cylinder Guard" and installs under your thumb turn mount plate, so it should be a DIY job. It took me a very long time to pick out my security door for this reason, it's very hard to find one that blocks potential reach-around disarms for less than $600. The most secure ones I saw all ensured that ...


5

That is called a manual flush bolt. The piece that protrudes through the top and bottom of the door is called the bolt head. Both the bolt head (which is threaded to an actuating rod), and the actuating rod (which is threaded to the lever actuator) are designed to be adjusted by threading them in or out. The bolt head is commonly keyed, i.e. it is not round ...


5

Yes. You snap it off along a score with a pair of pliers.


5

Privacy locksets (generally used for bathrooms and bedrooms) are designed to be less secure than a keyed lockset or deadbolt for a reason. In the event that access is needed from the outside (due to any number of circumstances important or mundane, see below) the privacy lockset can be opened from the outside with relative ease, usually with a small ...


4

If the strike bolt can be depressed by direct pressure when the small strike is not fully extended, then the lock is poorly made or broken. Replace it. You should consider using a lock of higher quality. If this lock has failed, then perhaps all other instances of the same make and model are on the verge of failing. In any case, test the lock before ...


4

If you are saying the bolt is extended into the frame and won't retract, try pulling the hinge pins and removing the door by "opening" the door on the hinge side.


4

The way to mitigate the safety risks is to not use a key inside. It doesn't provide any protection, anyway, so there is no good reason to use that type of lock; it is inherently unsafe even if locally allowed. The vast majority of break-ins don't involve picking locks, sawing through deadbolts, cutting arm holes in the door, or using other fancy, slow ...


4

In a deadbolt, the key cylinder is often directly linked to the bolt. But the hand turn-able knob only actuates on the cylinder. So under normal operation, the knob turns the cylinder, causing the bolt to move. The knob usual has a socket of some sort, and there's a shaft that comes from the key cylinder side, through the door. During installation, the ...


3

Those are screw caps, to prevent nasty people from tampering with the cylinder. They are generally removed by drilling them out.


3

The bolt may possibly be held in the door frame by friction due to misalignment. If this is vertical misalignment, using a prybar under the edge of the door and shifting the door up a little may allow the bolt to retract. If that doesn't do it, then use the prybar to shift the door down a little and see if that frees the bolt. If the misalignment is in-and-...


3

If you are having a hard time finding the strikes that do not have the rectangular plate, many latchset makers have the round ones like you have in the box with the others. Seems to me that they make the bolts or latch fit into any situation. According to one of the manufacturers the type of bolt you are looking for is called a "drive-in" latch Or as ...


3

Yes, a novice handyman can easily replace door knobs and deadbolts. All of these come with good instructions, so read and follow them and you will be fine. In North America, residential door knobs and door locks have a back set of either 2 3/8" or 2 3/4" - the backset is the distance from the edge of the door to the center of the hole for the door knob or ...


3

To my knowledge, you won't find any modern in-door deadbolts that can accommodate such a thin door. Even if you padded the width of your door around the installation point to reach the minimum needed, drilling the hole for the deadbolt will essentially remove a notch from your original door (deadbolts are commonly 1" thick). Your spacers will have to go ...


3

No, actually, the locking rod is made to snap off at various lengths, to make up for varying door thicknesses. Make sure to center the bolt itself on the door edge. Disregard the factory template, as it will be based on a different door thickness.


3

Sometimes sheds just are not built like standard construction. You are right that the door is mostly hung on what appears to be brick molding. If you want real strength from the hinges and the latch side of the door, setting it back into the opening where you can grab studs is going to be your best bet. Having the door inset a bit also makes prying ...


3

No and no (well yes, but not with the results that you want) It was done that way because it was installed backwards (on purpose) as an out-swing door rather than the typical in-swing door while the door frame itself was not reversed and is set up for the in-swing condition. Note that the piece of wood that the door closes against (stop molding) is not ...


3

Everyone of those that i have encountered as just be pushed in. Sometimes they are held in by friction and sometime they are loose and fall out. It could be that is a snug fit and when the screws that held the two halve of the lock together were tightened up it wedged it in rather tightly.


2

One of the "smart Levers" inside the core kept misaligning rendering my key useless to turn the core. I took everything apart, removed one of the 5 smart levers and it now works fine. Thanks for the encouragement to tackle this. 15 minute fix


2

I know these are older posts but I found it looking for the answer to the same question. If you search "drive in latch" with the brand name of the lock you are trying to get a round insert lock for instead of the latch plate that you have to carve the door for you will find what you are looking for. You can buy JUST the dead bolt insert part that matches ...


2

Looks like it is a double cylinder deadbolt (has key cylinder on both sides). Use a flathead screwdriver to remove the two black bolts.


2

For this scenario, since it's a hollow core door, I'd get your plywood templates aligned on the outside, and drill in from each side of the door. If you had a solid core door, I'd worry about not being aligned from each side and suggest holding the drill perfectly level and going all the way through from one side only.


2

Modern mortise locksets for bathrooms usually have a deadbolt release on the outside, opposite the deadbolt knob (or thumbturn) in the inside. The release is intended to be operated using a coin or screwdriver. Your lockset presumably lacks this external release feature. However it is likely that the lock body itself has openings on both sides for the ...


2

If anyone still needs help with this, i finally figured out the right way to remove this type of interconnected lock set. Thanks to Locksmith Ben, who was kind enough to help me on face time :) There is a tiny square shaped pin, which was spring loaded. i had to push it upwards and pull the knob out. Here is an annotated picture of my lock Here is the OP ...


2

The inside knobs are often removed on this type of product via a small slot or hole that will be visible at the stem of the knob. For a slot insert a small flat blade screwdriver in the slot and press in whilst pulling the knob away from the door. If there is just a small hole insert a round pin or small sized allen wrench in the hole. Press in the pin and ...


2

This may just be friction from the door frame pressing on the bolt, caused by humidity changes or a shift in the frame. If so, pulling or pushing on the door while trying to retract the bolt may loosen things enough to let you retract the bolt. If not, you can try pulling the hinge pins and removing the door from that side.


2

Fortis is a schlage product. go onto their web site and you might find what you are looking for. but most schlage products the parts are interchangeable so you can buy new locks and just reuse the latches.


2

The normal way is to not use a solenoid to operate the deadbolt but to open the striker plate on the other side. This is called an electric strike That way you can use a conventional key operated bolt as a way to open the door when there is no electrical power. You can buy these strikes for retrofitting to normal types of lock, both mortice locks and ...


2

It's all about keys. If you need a key to open the door, make sure you'll have a key when needed. You need several of each key, aside from the one on your keychain. Your life is worth spending the extra couple bucks on keys. Here's where the keys fit, from most used to least used: Keyring key: This stays on your keyring like every other key you've ever ...


2

The short answer is yes. You may even be able to save yourself some trouble by just swapping the deadbolt core (the small tube that holds the pins). When I first bought my house, I went around and re-keyed all the locks to the same key. I believe as long as the lock is the same brand, it's possible to re-key. Here is a video showing the removal of the core ...


2

Since your lock has a set screw, then yes, you can replace it. The set screw is used to hold the current lever in place. You would simply need another lever that fits that type of deadbolt. The catch here will be finding another part that fits but is sold separate from a deadbolt itself. A quick search turned up no sites selling just that one part.


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