14

First thing you need to do is find the set screw that releases the inside handle. then you pry off the escutcheon plate (trim plate). the two screws you are looking for are under the trim plate.


8

take the lock to your local home store that carries this line of locks. they will remove the core and put it in a SmartKey Reset Cradle. this returns the lock to an unprogrammed state. there is no way to do this yourself without disassembling the lock core, and there's about a bazillion point 2 pieces in there.


6

I've done it and you don't need the original key or a SmartKey. Disassemble it right down to the core. There will be two slip rings that can be pushed off with a flat blade screwdriver to allow you to get the core apart. Gently slide the outer cylinder off the inner core, remove the little bar in the center of the inner core and then lift off the slider-...


6

Aside from replacing the door, you can purchase and install reinforcement kits for your door and jamb. EDIT: These are also known as door wrap around plates. As you can see, it contains a metal bracket that fits around the door. Some just protect the edge while other models extends a few more inches over the door and covers the holes for the dead bolt ...


5

You'll have to remove the dead bolt and thumb turn mechanism in order to inspect it. It could just be gummed up in which case it needs to be cleaned and lubricated, but also common is someone forcing the lock and bending a component. If bent, you can try and straighten whatever is bent with a pair of pliers, but if it bent that easily it is probably a low-...


5

Looking carefully at your pic, the door appears to be a veneer covered rather than solid wood. You may be able to repair this damage to some degree, but it will never look like new again. Here are the steps to repair cracked veneer. Remove the lock hardware Open the crack slightly and apply/inject some good grade wood glue such as "Tite Bond II" into the ...


5

Yes. You snap it off along a score with a pair of pliers.


5

Privacy locksets (generally used for bathrooms and bedrooms) are designed to be less secure than a keyed lockset or deadbolt for a reason. In the event that access is needed from the outside (due to any number of circumstances important or mundane, see below) the privacy lockset can be opened from the outside with relative ease, usually with a small ...


5

It's called a "Thumb Turn Cover", "Door Latch Guard", or "Cylinder Guard" and installs under your thumb turn mount plate, so it should be a DIY job. It took me a very long time to pick out my security door for this reason, it's very hard to find one that blocks potential reach-around disarms for less than $600. The most secure ones I saw all ensured that ...


4

This style lockset is known as a mortise lockset. Dis-assembly and cleaning won't hurt. While you've got it apart, print the Baldwin diagram below, and note your dimensional differences. Some will be critical (holes for knob and deadbolt), others may be compensated for by strike plate adjustment or wooden block supports (under a shorter mortise body)....


4

That is called a manual flush bolt. The piece that protrudes through the top and bottom of the door is called the bolt head. Both the bolt head (which is threaded to an actuating rod), and the actuating rod (which is threaded to the lever actuator) are designed to be adjusted by threading them in or out. The bolt head is commonly keyed, i.e. it is not round ...


4

If you are saying the bolt is extended into the frame and won't retract, try pulling the hinge pins and removing the door by "opening" the door on the hinge side.


4

If the strike bolt can be depressed by direct pressure when the small strike is not fully extended, then the lock is poorly made or broken. Replace it. You should consider using a lock of higher quality. If this lock has failed, then perhaps all other instances of the same make and model are on the verge of failing. In any case, test the lock before ...


4

The way to mitigate the safety risks is to not use a key inside. It doesn't provide any protection, anyway, so there is no good reason to use that type of lock; it is inherently unsafe even if locally allowed. The vast majority of break-ins don't involve picking locks, sawing through deadbolts, cutting arm holes in the door, or using other fancy, slow ...


4

In a deadbolt, the key cylinder is often directly linked to the bolt. But the hand turn-able knob only actuates on the cylinder. So under normal operation, the knob turns the cylinder, causing the bolt to move. The knob usual has a socket of some sort, and there's a shaft that comes from the key cylinder side, through the door. During installation, the ...


3

If you are having a hard time finding the strikes that do not have the rectangular plate, many latchset makers have the round ones like you have in the box with the others. Seems to me that they make the bolts or latch fit into any situation. According to one of the manufacturers the type of bolt you are looking for is called a "drive-in" latch Or as ...


3

Yes, a novice handyman can easily replace door knobs and deadbolts. All of these come with good instructions, so read and follow them and you will be fine. In North America, residential door knobs and door locks have a back set of either 2 3/8" or 2 3/4" - the backset is the distance from the edge of the door to the center of the hole for the door knob or ...


3

Those are screw caps, to prevent nasty people from tampering with the cylinder. They are generally removed by drilling them out.


3

The bolt may possibly be held in the door frame by friction due to misalignment. If this is vertical misalignment, using a prybar under the edge of the door and shifting the door up a little may allow the bolt to retract. If that doesn't do it, then use the prybar to shift the door down a little and see if that frees the bolt. If the misalignment is in-and-...


3

To my knowledge, you won't find any modern in-door deadbolts that can accommodate such a thin door. Even if you padded the width of your door around the installation point to reach the minimum needed, drilling the hole for the deadbolt will essentially remove a notch from your original door (deadbolts are commonly 1" thick). Your spacers will have to go ...


3

No, actually, the locking rod is made to snap off at various lengths, to make up for varying door thicknesses. Make sure to center the bolt itself on the door edge. Disregard the factory template, as it will be based on a different door thickness.


2

One of the "smart Levers" inside the core kept misaligning rendering my key useless to turn the core. I took everything apart, removed one of the 5 smart levers and it now works fine. Thanks for the encouragement to tackle this. 15 minute fix


2

If it is just the key that has problems it is highly unlikely that you need to replace the whole knob, latch and lock set assembly. The lock cylinder itself is really likely to be a separate sub assembly that you can replace. From looking at your pictures it appears that the removal of the lock assembly is as simple as taking out the screws in this ...


2

The first thing I would try is lubricating the lock with some graphite. If it doesn't help you can remove the entire lockset. Bring it to a locksmith and see if it can be repaired. I would call first and set up an appoiintment to minimize the time you don't have a lock.


2

I know these are older posts but I found it looking for the answer to the same question. If you search "drive in latch" with the brand name of the lock you are trying to get a round insert lock for instead of the latch plate that you have to carve the door for you will find what you are looking for. You can buy JUST the dead bolt insert part that matches ...


2

Looks like it is a double cylinder deadbolt (has key cylinder on both sides). Use a flathead screwdriver to remove the two black bolts.


2

For this scenario, since it's a hollow core door, I'd get your plywood templates aligned on the outside, and drill in from each side of the door. If you had a solid core door, I'd worry about not being aligned from each side and suggest holding the drill perfectly level and going all the way through from one side only.


2

Fortis is a schlage product. go onto their web site and you might find what you are looking for. but most schlage products the parts are interchangeable so you can buy new locks and just reuse the latches.


2

Modern mortise locksets for bathrooms usually have a deadbolt release on the outside, opposite the deadbolt knob (or thumbturn) in the inside. The release is intended to be operated using a coin or screwdriver. Your lockset presumably lacks this external release feature. However it is likely that the lock body itself has openings on both sides for the ...


2

This may just be friction from the door frame pressing on the bolt, caused by humidity changes or a shift in the frame. If so, pulling or pushing on the door while trying to retract the bolt may loosen things enough to let you retract the bolt. If not, you can try pulling the hinge pins and removing the door from that side.


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