Hot answers tagged

44

I think your cracking the floor is a blessing in disguise. Clearly there is water under the tile that needs to be dealt with. I'd start by checking the obvious things like the toilet seal and the bathtub and/or shower drains. But ultimately you're going to want to pull that tile up, dry it out thoroughly, replace any water-damaged materials, and replace ...


35

No. Wood frame construction is generally done for rigidity not strength. You can climb a tree and have the branches deflect significantly before they break - the strength is fine - if you build a house with just strength in mind then you'd be bouncing all over the place. Wood frame construction is instead designed for rigidity such that when you walk ...


23

Sounds like a fire waiting to happen. You'll need to cut out the damaged part and splice them together again. If there isn't enough slack then you'll need a new short run of wire to bridge the gap. Because you have physical access to the area The splices should be inside junction boxes. Bill the work/materials to the plumber or deduct it from his bill if ...


17

The real problem is the monkeys. The collateral damage due to flying rocks would best be dealt with by trapping and relocating the monkeys. Or, it might be helpful to use an electric (chicken wire) fence to keep the monkeys off the roof. Other deterrents might be motion activated sprinklers or ultrasonic alarms. Obviously, there is not a perfect solution, ...


12

I live in a small Himalayan Village facing the same problem. But we kept our solar panel in such a place which is not accessible to kids or monkeys. The second thing I would like to mention is that if our neighboring kids don’t have that much of vision of damage of the solar panel due to stone pelting to monkeys may broke our panel - we have to make them ...


11

The only case of having to replace studs and such I’m aware of is from termite/dry rot damage. A number of years ago, my 2-story California home was to be painted. Before starting, the contractor went to repair some siding panels were edges were coming lose. He peeked behind one and went “oh, crap”. He had found severe termite damage. A bunch of studs has ...


10

The ceramic granules are the protective layer of the shingle. They're not merely aesthetic. They offer UV, impact, and corrosion protection, and the shingle is vulnerable when they're removed. The roof probably will not leak now, or in a few weeks, or a few months, but eventually the shingles will deteriorate badly enough that water gets through above the ...


10

A picture would help, but the "runs into a socket" part sounds like this is an appliance cord and not house wiring. Which makes it a lot easier. If there is ONE copper wire exposed, and the rest looks fine, then 5-6 wraps of electrical tape will be fine - that's basically what electrical tape is for. If you see more than one copper wire exposed there are ...


10

It’s highly unlikely that “failed” grout would create the refill rate of wet flooring you describe. Most shower failures are generated by leaky or failing plumbing in the wall, behind the tile. I have often seen the water damage extend to the framing, which necessitates cutting out and replacing that portion of framing. Your wet floor problem needs to be ...


10

Call a plumber immediately! This is uncomfortably close to my recent experiences.. My kitchen floor had a damaged tile (similar story, something got dropped on it) and water was welling up from under it when it was stepped on. We thought it might have been absorbed by water seeping into the damaged area, so it wasn't a huge issue, it would dry out, then it ...


10

You need to consider the final selling price you could get for it, if it was fixed up and in great shape. Based on "outdated" ones at $43k, maybe $45k-$50k? So there's a bunch of costs you need to estimate and add up: Initial purchase + real-estate fees Demo/disposal costs Carrying costs × amount of time this will take (interest on money borrowed, ...


9

Get a dehumidifier running in there and see if you can dry it out, you’ll have to stop using the bathroom (if you can) and it might take a while (possibly days) Once it’s completely dry try using one fixture at a time and see if you can isolate the cause. The other posts have given you some good advice and you might end up paying someone to rip up that ...


7

Remove cabinet door. Fix leak. Remove particle board and put a box fan blowing into the cabinet for at least 24 hours. Treat the floor under there with a mold killing cleaning spray. Put the fan back while you cut the new bottom. I would do it piecemeal before removing the face of the cabinet. Which you may have to because removing the face of a corner ...


6

Unless my house was all brick and done well I would not let ivy grow on it. Ivy spreads out and finds its way in any crack. As the ivy matures it grows thicker to keep spreading. As it grows thicker it will push out on things once it is in the crack. I have ivy on a chain link fence in back yard and fence is ruined. Think about the ivy getting in ...


5

How big are the rocks and how far are they being thrown from? Panels are generally designed to be able to withstand small to medium sized hail... if kids are throwing rocks large enough to break panel glass at your house, I'd imagine your house would be taking a lot of damage as well. Stating the obvious, but anything obstructing the sun will reduce output ...


5

I would think a security camera that records, along with a phone call to the police, would be cheaper and easier than trying to figure this out. Along with the threat of legal action and jail time may come restitution for any damage to your panels.


5

So it sounds like the AFCI breaker did its job and saved you from a potentially nasty jolt. The AFCI detects the arc (i.e. your metal drill bit contacting the live wire) and cuts the power. If the wire wasn't severed, you can probably get away with just wrapping the wire in electrical tape and then wrapping the whole scar. If the wires were severed, you can ...


5

Another trick, actually a variation of that of @agentp, is to use wire mesh (also called hardware cloth) instead of a wood strip. Choose one with small holes, 1/8" if you can find it, 1/4" is real common in the building stores. It is particularly useful when the thickness of the material is thin (as in the case of interior hollow-core doors 1/8" luan or ...


5

Yes there is a time when wood frame buildings have that happen it is a narrow case but I'll explain it. Back "in the day" cantilevered decks were all the rage for houses. These work by building the house so that the floor joists extend outside the house (generally 4 feet) with a deck built on them. So the effect you get is this deck just "...


5

Gregmac's answer is good but just take material costs. Here are your bare bare minimums. 3k drywall + 500 misc drywall. 4k for appliances 2k for demo removal 3k for cabinets and counters - kitchen and bath 3k for flooring 2k misc lumber - subfloors stairs and so forth This is getting the cheapest materials possible and using the cheapest may result in a ...


5

The Building Code requires any structure that looses more than 50% of its value must be brought up to the new current code...it cannot just be replaced to match existing. This includes fire walls between units, electrical systems (including the use of conduit due to the size of the building), sound control between units, required number of parking spaces, ...


4

Those are called "nail pops". They are the fasteners (nails mostly, but occasionally screws) that have been pushed through the drywall surface due to either forces exerted on the drywall panel or movement from the framing piece they attached too. Unless you notice multiple nail pops it shouldn't be a problem. To repair gently hammer (the nail) or turn (the ...


4

Could you post a simple sign that asks the well-meaning kids to not throw rocks at your roof? You would want to depict rock throwing hitting a solar panel or glass pane. I could not find a precise sign but something like these might work as inspiration:


4

OK - so you're not going to be able to stop the kids from throwing rocks at monkeys and you're not going to be able to protect the solar panels from rocks. The only solution I see is to keep the monkeys off the roof. If the monkeys will run away from water, you can get motion detecting spriklers (available at Amazon) and mount them by your solar panels. The ...


4

Wiring codes may have a thing or two to say about fixing wires with electrical tape and burying that part in plaster. This may be noncompliant and possibly illegal where you live. You’re lucky that the damaged wire is in a conduit—it should be possible to pull in a new wire, which is the safest way of fixing this. Disconnect power before you do anything. ...


4

This is a trick for small holes. Cut a strip of wood just wide enough to fit through the hole and length about 2x the size of the hole. ( form the looks a wood paint stirrer may be just the thing ) Tie a string around the center of the strip. Put good glue ( gorilla glue maybe ) on the ends of the strip. Push it all the way through the hole, then pull ...


4

Turn the adjusting knob on the locking pliers so that it takes both hands to clamp them shut on the screw head and squashes some small flats into the screw head when shut. Hold your locking pliers flat against the wall Clamp them shut Unscrew You want the pliers so tight that you can barely get them clamped. That will get you the maximum grip on the screw ...


4

That vertical member is a truss chord not a post. It’s in compression (as @SteveSh) has identified. It’s buckling due to an excessive vertical load (and probably because of a small defect in the wood). This phenomenon is identified in Euler’s Formula. While I don’t understand the formula, the concept we know it by is the “slenderness ratio”. That is to say, ...


4

What you're missing is entitlements I.E. permission to build. From the government you'll need building permits, and they will have a bunch of requirements - conditions they'll put on your building permit, such as replace the plumbing lateral, install all AFCI breakers, etc. You are also in an HOA district, and the HOA will have a bunch of community ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible