12

You should cut away carpet. The cabinets will last longer than the carpet and will just be a mess when it's time to install new carpet. I'd want the cabinets secured directly to the floor, not through carpet/pad. When you pull up the carpet and baseboard, you'll see the tack strip. If you are careful, you can re-use it, but it is cheap to replace. You'...


9

Start by making a template. Using a dry-erase marker, draw a line on the sink where it will meet the new cabinet cutout. You can hold a ruler flat against the rectangular piece shown in the photo to guide the marker. Temporarily remove the currently installed rectangle and replace it with a rectangle of material from which the template will be cut. Cut ...


9

Carpenters don't usually do custom cabinetry--it requires a special skillset and some specialized tools. Some do, of course, and if you find a high-caliber handyperson he or she could probably get the job done. A better bet is probably a local custom cabinet shop. They'll have the tooling required to match your design, edge profile, etc., and they'll be ...


8

If they'll accept a full-size model, use the technique for making a template for cutting vinyl flooring to the right size and shape (taken from another answer of mine): ... I use a roll of craft paper and sticky tape to make a template of the room. Start in the center of the room, lightly stick a strip to the ground, and cut it at the edges of the room. ...


7

While I can't speak to the quality of all manufacturers blades, in general the blade that comes with the saw is of no lower quality than any other blade offered by the manufacturer. Most miter saws come with a 24 tooth FTG (Flat Top Grind) blade, which is good for fast course cuts. If you're looking to chop 2x lumber, this blade will work fine for you. If ...


6

I think this is as close as you are going to get, because of the width of your face-frame:


6

This is mostly speculation, but I would say there are 3 major reasons: Cost. Adding any sort of custom feature is usually quite costly, and the way homes are sold/built, most people just don't care enough. I'm currently building a house, and I would guess that adding a built-in shelf like that from a builder would run somewhere in the $1000-$5000 range, ...


6

There are dozens and dozens (hundreds? thousands?) of types and shapes of "spline" material. I recommend that you do NOT go on a "goose chase" for an exact duplicate of what was installed previously. Instead, I recommend that you take a door and glass pane with you to a local window/door/glass shop and find any alternative that will ...


5

Why are you using a router? Does your microwave overlap the edges? If so, I'd use a jigsaw, seems to me to be much easier set up.


4

I don't know if I'd go as far as to call the stock blades "crap", but most of the stock ones are going to be basically all-purpose blades. I use mine mainly for framing, and the stock blade was actually a little nicer than I need for what I'm using it for. If you're going to use it for cabinetry, you'll likely want to get a blade for it geared toward that ...


4

Straightly has entirely to do with your fence/guide, and there are many ways to do that. You can fence the baseplate, use collars and fence those, or use bearing bits and fence those - it's just a matter of offset from the cut line. Cleanly is trickier, and depends on where you need clean. Solid wood trim would allow you to cover your sins, while trying to ...


4

Just a warning, unless you are pretty handy this should be done by a pro. If you have done large glue ups before, and have 2 people to help at glue up time and everything protected from dripping glue, you may have a chance. It starts with your wood selection, for a finished hand rail that will measure 1 1/4" to 1" thick by 2" wide you will need 8- 1/4" ...


3

Thanks to all of your comments I completed this task. Here is what I did: Bought a $5 compass from Ocean State job lots tacked a small 1/4" lauan to the side, butting against the sink Transferred the curve to the lauan. Did this about 6 times until happy Cut the curve with skill saw about 80 degrees, gently sanded the curve to the line with a pwr sander, ...


3

It depends on how good you are at woodworking. As RedGrittyBrick points out, I might only attempt this project if I wasn't concerned about destroying the door. Recreate the door The first option, is to build an exact copy of the door in the proper size. Remove material from the top/bottom If you can take the door apart, you should be able to cut down the ...


3

How would you go about shortening or replacing these two doors? I'd only attempt this if The door was to be shortened by more then the maximum width of the top rail. I could find router bits that give a reasonable match to existing profiles. I had a plan B in case I wreck the door. I would cut the top off at the new height and see if the panel is loose or ...


3

This is a thread-cam locking shelf support. You can undo it by turning the screw a quarter turn counter clockwise, then lifting up on the shelf.


3

From what I can tell these appear to be hinges made by GRASS. A look at an online retailer seems to point to these hinges: http://www.hardwaresource.com/hinges/cabinet-hinges/blum-european-hinges-grass-european-hinges/grass-european-hinges/grass-830-and-831-hinges However the above appear to be obsolete and they recommend replacing with these hinges: http:...


3

Make the axle of the wheel intersect the axis of rotation of the door through the hinges.


2

The only problem with a router would be in the corners they will be rounded not totally square. A very small straight bit would give the smallest Chamfer (non square). This last fathers day my wife bought me this set of router bits I thought oh boy how long are these going to last I usually spend 15-20 per bit. The ones I have used have worked well, I ...


2

Here's what I'd do: Cut an opening in the drywall appropriate for your cabinet. Allow for the thickness of your cabinet walls. Cut off the one or two studs that are likely to interfere with the opening, from the back side, 1-1/2" above the opening in the drywall. Cut out the bottom wall plate flush with the sides of the rough opening. From behind, frame the ...


2

I would say the best solution is one that gets the particle board monstrosities out of the house, but you probably want a best that's less extreme. If this is just a trim board preventing stuff from rolling under the cabinet, replacing it with a trim board less subject to falling apart at any hint of moisture would be better. Vinyl trim boards would be ...


2

Think about running down to you hobby shop or home store and checking out their supply of balsa wood. That stuff is really light and easy to work with. It comes in many different sizes, sheets and square stock. It can be glued with regular wood glue or super glue and can be painted to match the ceiling.


1

The search term you want is, "bending handrail". You'll form the curve to the outside of the treads with a ton of glue and clamps. Then, a few scant hours later, you'll have belt sanded the whole affair smooth and be ready to finish and install. The hard part is that your rail should probably be centered on the balusters. Which means the balusters are in ...


1

One way to secure the concrete top to your cabinet is to use construction adhesive that is rated for bonding with both wood and concrete. The concrete and wood should be clean and dry before attempting to do the bonding. After the adhesive has dried the top will be pretty much permanently bonded to the wood of the cabinet. If you want to have the top be ...


1

I would use slides that fit under the movable shelf. With such a narrow space already it would be an loss of width using side mount slides. If you go with the tray idea then side mount slides would be way easier to secure to the tray sides. Under slides will work tray or trayless.


1

You can usually buy replacement doors either from the manufacturer (if they have direct-to-public sales) or through one of their distributors. The upside is that it will be a perfect match, the downside is the usually high cost. You'll need to know who made the cabinets which isn't always an easy thing to find out. I've replicated doors on several occasions ...


1

Since you say this is a bonus room, it's likely that the joists you are talking about are not load-bearing. Therefore, I would recommend you do just as you suggest - build the shelf between the studs, and tie all the framing together. I would also suggest at the top and bottom where you have a stud (the one that was cut) to run a 2x4 to the adjoining ...


1

As others have noted, cabinet door surgery is prone to be bothersome and not cheap. If I had to do it, I'd be taking a horizontal slice out of the middle and hoping that the panel could float free for more cutting. You'd have to mentally commit to the possibility that the doors would be butchered beyond repair. I couldn't find any double-continuous-arch ...


1

I'm assuming you mean want to expand the rectangular front cut out, and not some other hole. I think most hand-held routers would do the job. There is no need for a plunge feature in this operation, but you will want to guide the router along a straight edge to do a good job. My first choice would be downward spiral ¼" straight bit, to eject the wood chips ...


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