33

Unless you go to more expensive industrial products, you'll have trouble finding thermostats that operate reliably at near freezing temperatures. Using a space heater to heat up the entire crawl space is going to be inefficient when all you need is to keep the pipes above freezing. Heat tape seems like a much better option, it's made for this exact purpose. ...


30

No, you can't do anything like that at all. That's a suicide cord. Meaning it has 2 plugs on it, and in certain conditions the prongs of one can be unplugged and live. Nothing should ever have 2 plugs. Remove the "plug-in thermostats" from the equation - they're cheap anyway. Use hardwired thermostats -- those can be paralleled in the manner you ...


8

The Code requires a minimum of 18” clear from the bottom of wood floor framing to the ground. (See ICC Figure 403.1 (3).) I remember seeing that the bottom of beams can’t be within 12” of the ground, but I can’t find that requirement...maybe that was in an older code. Btw, don’t forget you need an 18”x24” crawl space access if you go through the floor and ...


7

There is no direct answer as far as building codes are concerned. A crawlspace is a designated area under the floor that allows for your house to not get flooded. That it allows you access to plumbing and electrical... or whatever, that is not its innate purpose nor is there any sort of building requirement around it. Since there is no requirement, ...


5

It seems to me the biggest problem is if your heater doesn't turn on and you don't know about it, right? If it fails to turn on but you do know about it, you can address the problem. As such, if it were me I'd consider this a "good" use for home automation. I'd get a plug that could connect to my network (either directly or via a hub) and have ...


5

What's available here in the UK may be a bit different to what you can get, but this might guide you a bit. We have mains-rated thermostats designed to bring on gas-fired heating systems and protect the system and building from frost (called frost stats). That's what you're trying to do. These are strictly for hardwiring, are are only suitable for ...


4

it may be possible to put insulation in such that the pipe is insulated from the outside/crawlspace but not from the house. That way, the heat from the house will keep the pipes warm. I had to do this in my house. The foam insulation guy sprayed foam onto the underside of the floor and left the water pipe exposed. The pipe that never froze started freezing. ...


3

In Europe there is apparently safety regulation that forbids companies working in crawlspaces lower then 60 cm. I found out when I had a gas-man come into my house for a quote. He told me he could not legally do the job. I searched the internet and found a reference in a Dutch site to "NEN 3140": https://kennisbank.isso.nl/kenniskaart/veilig-werken-in-...


3

Water flows in the direction of least resistance. Moisture is either coming up from below (a rising water table) or its coming from the surrounding ground water in the saturated soil, or both. If it comes up from a rising water table, it will enter the crawl space from below. If it comes from the surrounding ground water, it COULD enter the crawl space ...


3

Leave it alone. There's nothing wrong with this, especially in a subfloor. More air is more insulation, and in this case the stratification means here's not going to be much in the way of convection currents to mess it up.


2

Almost certainly for drainage. Carrying any water leaking in from the walls to the sump. My understanding of radon mitigation would be that this gap and the sump pit need to be sealed from the top and power vented to the exterior. Any underslab drainage on the "basement" side should be connected to the vent system as well. If you already had a radon ...


2

I had a similar situation with a house redo with a crawl space. This house is near the coast in Maine and both the contractor and flooring company strongly recommended against using tradional wood flooring on the first floor. They were concerned with cupping of the wood. It got to the point where the flooring company - all they do is wood flooring- would not ...


2

From you question and follow on Comment, it appears that the location of the sump pump is at the right location. It’s at the lowest point and after the heavy rain, the sump hole filled with water. From your descriptions, it appears that you believe the sump basin is sealed therefore not allowing water into the basin. From your original question – There is ...


1

Programmer66 has some good suggestions. Some others: Be sure the entire area around the sump basin, including where the perforated pipes connect, is immersed in washed rock (all the way to the footings in the corner). This essentially creates one large drainage area, and any water should find its way into the pipe without any further puncturing of the sump ...


1

Doesn't matter how deep the footer is. It's about the water table. You could get a drill rig and redi-mix plant out there and make the footer 50' deeper using a secant cutoff wall. The water table wouldn't care, it would go under it. The way you fix this is by lowering the local water table using French or Buckeye drains. Fortunately your property is on ...


1

Your post reads like you have an understanding of the implications of moisture on a hardwood floor. I think the existing oak floors are a good indication that your project should go OK. The key points that I have to offer are: Ventilate the crawl space. Covering the ground with plastic is not a substitute for ventilation. Let the flooring, sub-floor and ...


1

The crawl space must not be more moist than the space above it, or the moisture will migrate through your flooring. You've already placed a vapor barrier in your crawl space, so we assume you have a non-ventilated crawl space. This means you have no foundation vents around the perimeter. For a sealed crawl space, the vapor barrier must be sealed (i.e. taped)...


1

"Best" is what you can do in that tight space. If the cavity is filled with masonry it's probably fine. Ideally you'd replace the block with a like block and tuck-point the mortar in place. Might be easier said than done, though.


1

Standing Water in a crawl space is never desirable. It causes so many problems: Water attracts pests Mold and fungus can grow fast. Mold produces allergens and affect your respiratory system. Hantavirus from pests. (HCF) Microbial growth. This can lead to headaches, etc. Actually I’ve done a few dozen projects on the Oregon coast and everything just ...


1

I would fasten sheet metal angle (or Z-mold) flashing to the bottom of the furring strips before the siding goes on. The horizontal flange depth would be the 1-3/4" or 2-1/4" So that it's tight to the wooden sill or concrete foundation at the back, depending on height. Like so (elevation view): | | | | | | | <|------|-- furring ...


1

An L or Z-shaped metal flashing is often used to bring water from behind a cladding out to the front of the wall (for example, when the upper part of a wall is clad with stucco/siding/etc and the lower part is clad with brick/stone/other masonry). Metal also makes a nice barrier against things that chew, burrow, and otherwise damage structures. You could ...


1

The Code requires a minimum ceiling height of 7’-0” for habitable spaces, unless 1) it’s a slopped ceiling, 2) basement remodel, 3) bathroom or shower. (See ICC R304.1) Slopped ceilings shall have at least 50% with at least 7’ and slope down to no more than 5’. Basements can have 6’-8” ceilings in non-habitable spaces. Not more than 75% of a sloped ...


1

I think the main reasons for using wood floor framing in lieu of concrete and steel is 1) ease of construction and cost, 2) soil bearing values, 3) fire sprinkler costs vrs. smoke detectors, 4) higher cost of insurance, 5) higher taxes, 6) ease of future remodeling, 7) appearance 1) Traditional wood framing is significantly less cost than elevated concrete ...


1

You need to have it redone and buried. Though it is unsightly, the real problem is not appearance but the exposure, not only to the elements but to human influence. It needs to be trenched and placed below freeze level.


1

I would insulate the outside walls with the rigid foam board insulation like you described first, but do not do the floor at this point in time. Then see what kind of improvement that provides. I'm not sure what I would do about the existing vapor barrier that's on the walls. If you leave it in place and put the foam board on top of it, then it's possible ...


1

In most cases, you would have both a supply and return in the crawl. If the crawl is properly air sealed/encapsulated, then the air in the crawl should be the "same" as what is circulated in the home, so no issue with a return in there. If it's not properly encapsulated, then I would take the steps necessary to do so before adding a return as you may ...


1

Sounds a lot like my son's new house. Since you already have an HVAC duct that runs through the crawl space just add a register to that duct. My guess is that unless you're actually going to seal the crawl space and make it air tight relative to the rest of the basement, you'll have enough leakage around the access door so that no additional return is ...


1

The vents you removed were constructed entirely of 1x2 lumber and could be easily recreated. You'd want to use cedar or pressure-treated lumber for rot-resistance, if not a synthetic. All cuts are square. Some corrosion-resistant screws, properly piloted and countersunk, would make them solid. Trim-head screws or splitless siding nails would secure them well....


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