16

Overloads don't trip a GFCI. Period. If there was an overload, it would trip the actual circuit breaker. Since this is a GFCI/receptacle (as opposed to a GFCI/breaker) and the GFCI trips, that is a GFCI problem - 100% - and not an overcurrent situation. 14 AWG raises the question of the size of the breaker. If it is 15A then everything is good. If it is 20A ...


8

The Code requires a minimum of 18” clear from the bottom of wood floor framing to the ground. (See ICC Figure 403.1 (3).) I remember seeing that the bottom of beams can’t be within 12” of the ground, but I can’t find that requirement...maybe that was in an older code. Btw, don’t forget you need an 18”x24” crawl space access if you go through the floor and ...


7

There is no direct answer as far as building codes are concerned. A crawlspace is a designated area under the floor that allows for your house to not get flooded. That it allows you access to plumbing and electrical... or whatever, that is not its innate purpose nor is there any sort of building requirement around it. Since there is no requirement, ...


3

In Europe there is apparently safety regulation that forbids companies working in crawlspaces lower then 60 cm. I found out when I had a gas-man come into my house for a quote. He told me he could not legally do the job. I searched the internet and found a reference in a Dutch site to "NEN 3140": https://kennisbank.isso.nl/kenniskaart/veilig-werken-in-...


3

Water flows in the direction of least resistance. Moisture is either coming up from below (a rising water table) or its coming from the surrounding ground water in the saturated soil, or both. If it comes up from a rising water table, it will enter the crawl space from below. If it comes from the surrounding ground water, it COULD enter the crawl space ...


3

An alternate method avoiding high electricity bills and the necessary water drain for the dehumidifier: Installing a fan of an old PC at the Luv side, connected to a small power supply from an old phone or similar and a timer. If the fan runs only in the night, it pushes in statistically colder and dryer air. In 1 or 2 weeks the space will be much dryer.


2

I had a similar situation with a house redo with a crawl space. This house is near the coast in Maine and both the contractor and flooring company strongly recommended against using tradional wood flooring on the first floor. They were concerned with cupping of the wood. It got to the point where the flooring company - all they do is wood flooring- would not ...


2

In the summer the temperature in the crawl space will be lower than ambient and exterior vents will promote condensation. But yeah adding outlets from your air-con system that feed dry air to the crawl-space should work. during the winter you probably want to feed outdoor air instead.


2

You could put a dehumidifier in the space. A dehumidifier is basically a refrigeration unit which is optimized to condense water vapor from a space. It will not cool the space and in fact will be a net heat source. There would be a problem in getting rid of the condensed water. You would want to pipe it outside and have it drip into the ground. Some ...


2

Almost certainly for drainage. Carrying any water leaking in from the walls to the sump. My understanding of radon mitigation would be that this gap and the sump pit need to be sealed from the top and power vented to the exterior. Any underslab drainage on the "basement" side should be connected to the vent system as well. If you already had a radon ...


1

I think the main reasons for using wood floor framing in lieu of concrete and steel is 1) ease of construction and cost, 2) soil bearing values, 3) fire sprinkler costs vrs. smoke detectors, 4) higher cost of insurance, 5) higher taxes, 6) ease of future remodeling, 7) appearance 1) Traditional wood framing is significantly less cost than elevated concrete ...


1

Doesn't matter how deep the footer is. It's about the water table. You could get a drill rig and redi-mix plant out there and make the footer 50' deeper using a secant cutoff wall. The water table wouldn't care, it would go under it. The way you fix this is by lowering the local water table using French or Buckeye drains. Fortunately your property is on ...


1

I would insulate the outside walls with the rigid foam board insulation like you described first, but do not do the floor at this point in time. Then see what kind of improvement that provides. I'm not sure what I would do about the existing vapor barrier that's on the walls. If you leave it in place and put the foam board on top of it, then it's possible ...


1

In most cases, you would have both a supply and return in the crawl. If the crawl is properly air sealed/encapsulated, then the air in the crawl should be the "same" as what is circulated in the home, so no issue with a return in there. If it's not properly encapsulated, then I would take the steps necessary to do so before adding a return as you may ...


1

Sounds a lot like my son's new house. Since you already have an HVAC duct that runs through the crawl space just add a register to that duct. My guess is that unless you're actually going to seal the crawl space and make it air tight relative to the rest of the basement, you'll have enough leakage around the access door so that no additional return is ...


1

Aside from what else has been said, the #1 practical priority is to staple the cables so that if cables are yanked on, the staples catch the force and it damages the cable there. You don't want it yanking it out of wherever it's connected, because that could cause all sorts of additional problems in places that are harder to access.


1

You can run NM cable (the official term for Romex, which is a brand name) in a crawl space either ALONG the SIDES of the floor joists, or THROUGH them (i.e. fed through drilled holes). But you cannot just staple it TO the bottom of the joists. Since that may not be an option here, the next choice is to nail small "runner" boards to the bottoms of the joists, ...


1

The "less complicated" solution is as typically found under mobile homes in cold climates, where the "skirt" if any is typically not insulated. Pipe insulation and heat tape. Or these days, your better quality, less failures option (at least on the supply side) is an INTERNAL pipe heating cable. In either case, plenty of insulation on the outside of the ...


1

Not using graded lumber can get you in trouble. Or what I mean is using a lower grade than allowed for a residence. If you ever have an earthquake this could be an area that the insurance company says they won’t cover your loss. And you want to use material that is below grade 2 and specifically listed as not for structural. I would not have this prior to ...


1

The short pipe looks like it's a condensate drain - which will trickle when the AC is operating. It needs to run to a drain or to the outside. It looks like the insulation over the pipes has been damaged by the condensate running over it, and will need to be replaced. Even if the drain wasn't running onto them, the pipes are cold, so will sweat unless they'...


1

I fully agree with Isherwood that it depends on the stability of the floor. I have attached tile directly to T&G flooring but it was a bit tighter or more solid looking than yours looks like. I would put down backer board in your case I would trowel a layer of thin set with a large notch trowel put the backer board down and screw the backer to the ...


1

Your post reads like you have an understanding of the implications of moisture on a hardwood floor. I think the existing oak floors are a good indication that your project should go OK. The key points that I have to offer are: Ventilate the crawl space. Covering the ground with plastic is not a substitute for ventilation. Let the flooring, sub-floor and ...


1

The crawl space must not be more moist than the space above it, or the moisture will migrate through your flooring. You've already placed a vapor barrier in your crawl space, so we assume you have a non-ventilated crawl space. This means you have no foundation vents around the perimeter. For a sealed crawl space, the vapor barrier must be sealed (i.e. taped)...


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