16

Overloads don't trip a GFCI. Period. If there was an overload, it would trip the actual circuit breaker. Since this is a GFCI/receptacle (as opposed to a GFCI/breaker) and the GFCI trips, that is a GFCI problem - 100% - and not an overcurrent situation. 14 AWG raises the question of the size of the breaker. If it is 15A then everything is good. If it is 20A ...


3

An alternate method avoiding high electricity bills and the necessary water drain for the dehumidifier: Installing a fan of an old PC at the Luv side, connected to a small power supply from an old phone or similar and a timer. If the fan runs only in the night, it pushes in statistically colder and dryer air. In 1 or 2 weeks the space will be much dryer.


3

Sure you can fix this, but I wouldn’t opt for the “shelf” idea. Typically, in a post and beam foundation, all loads are transferred directly to the soil. Installing a “shelf” will put thrust on the foundation wall. Obviously the foundation is marginal and I doubt the wall is designed for any horizontal thrust. You’ll be pouring several “pad” footings, so ...


2

Since its under an addition I think your guess about being part of an irrigation system that was abandoned is the most probable.


2

I wouldn't. You'd essentially be sealing the heater's fate of rust and decay. (See what I did there?) First, you might find it less painful than you think to get the poly under the heater. A little levering or winching and it'll be off the ground the half inch you need. I'd put your main poly sheet down, then some thin plywood or something to protect it. ...


2

In the summer the temperature in the crawl space will be lower than ambient and exterior vents will promote condensation. But yeah adding outlets from your air-con system that feed dry air to the crawl-space should work. during the winter you probably want to feed outdoor air instead.


2

You could put a dehumidifier in the space. A dehumidifier is basically a refrigeration unit which is optimized to condense water vapor from a space. It will not cool the space and in fact will be a net heat source. There would be a problem in getting rid of the condensed water. You would want to pipe it outside and have it drip into the ground. Some ...


2

I think you want to insure good drainage under the plastic sheeting. I don't think it's a good idea to leave the channels to fill or to collapse. At some point work in the crawl space might be required to repair plumbing and hidden channels under plastic sheeting might cause problems. Flexible porous plastic drainage pipe in the existing channels might ...


1

Aside from what else has been said, the #1 practical priority is to staple the cables so that if cables are yanked on, the staples catch the force and it damages the cable there. You don't want it yanking it out of wherever it's connected, because that could cause all sorts of additional problems in places that are harder to access.


1

You can run NM cable (the official term for Romex, which is a brand name) in a crawl space either ALONG the SIDES of the floor joists, or THROUGH them (i.e. fed through drilled holes). But you cannot just staple it TO the bottom of the joists. Since that may not be an option here, the next choice is to nail small "runner" boards to the bottoms of the joists, ...


1

I fully agree with Isherwood that it depends on the stability of the floor. I have attached tile directly to T&G flooring but it was a bit tighter or more solid looking than yours looks like. I would put down backer board in your case I would trowel a layer of thin set with a large notch trowel put the backer board down and screw the backer to the ...


1

The "less complicated" solution is as typically found under mobile homes in cold climates, where the "skirt" if any is typically not insulated. Pipe insulation and heat tape. Or these days, your better quality, less failures option (at least on the supply side) is an INTERNAL pipe heating cable. In either case, plenty of insulation on the outside of the ...


1

Not using graded lumber can get you in trouble. Or what I mean is using a lower grade than allowed for a residence. If you ever have an earthquake this could be an area that the insurance company says they won’t cover your loss. And you want to use material that is below grade 2 and specifically listed as not for structural. I would not have this prior to ...


1

The short pipe looks like it's a condensate drain - which will trickle when the AC is operating. It needs to run to a drain or to the outside. It looks like the insulation over the pipes has been damaged by the condensate running over it, and will need to be replaced. Even if the drain wasn't running onto them, the pipes are cold, so will sweat unless they'...


1

Yep, you need to worry about the structure. You may be fine with a pressure treated box-frame inside the void, if the section isn't directly load-bearing. But typically, a proper steel angle lintel is required and that must run at least over half of the neighbor block width. A call to a Mason might surprise you with how cheap it'll be for them to knock it ...


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