33

Unless you go to more expensive industrial products, you'll have trouble finding thermostats that operate reliably at near freezing temperatures. Using a space heater to heat up the entire crawl space is going to be inefficient when all you need is to keep the pipes above freezing. Heat tape seems like a much better option, it's made for this exact purpose. ...


30

No, you can't do anything like that at all. That's a suicide cord. Meaning it has 2 plugs on it, and in certain conditions the prongs of one can be unplugged and live. Nothing should ever have 2 plugs. Remove the "plug-in thermostats" from the equation - they're cheap anyway. Use hardwired thermostats -- those can be paralleled in the manner you ...


5

It seems to me the biggest problem is if your heater doesn't turn on and you don't know about it, right? If it fails to turn on but you do know about it, you can address the problem. As such, if it were me I'd consider this a "good" use for home automation. I'd get a plug that could connect to my network (either directly or via a hub) and have ...


5

What's available here in the UK may be a bit different to what you can get, but this might guide you a bit. We have mains-rated thermostats designed to bring on gas-fired heating systems and protect the system and building from frost (called frost stats). That's what you're trying to do. These are strictly for hardwiring, are are only suitable for ...


4

it may be possible to put insulation in such that the pipe is insulated from the outside/crawlspace but not from the house. That way, the heat from the house will keep the pipes warm. I had to do this in my house. The foam insulation guy sprayed foam onto the underside of the floor and left the water pipe exposed. The pipe that never froze started freezing. ...


2

From you question and follow on Comment, it appears that the location of the sump pump is at the right location. It’s at the lowest point and after the heavy rain, the sump hole filled with water. From your descriptions, it appears that you believe the sump basin is sealed therefore not allowing water into the basin. From your original question – There is ...


1

What is your house heat? If it's some sort of hot air furnace, you might be able to tap it? Otherwise there are "construction heaters" you can rent which include indirect fire (no fumes) hot air units, with ducts and blowers. But probably more than you want to spend... Thirdly, unless firstly, as it's simplest and least expensive and most portable: ...


1

Programmer66 has some good suggestions. Some others: Be sure the entire area around the sump basin, including where the perforated pipes connect, is immersed in washed rock (all the way to the footings in the corner). This essentially creates one large drainage area, and any water should find its way into the pipe without any further puncturing of the sump ...


1

You need to have it redone and buried. Though it is unsightly, the real problem is not appearance but the exposure, not only to the elements but to human influence. It needs to be trenched and placed below freeze level.


1

The vents you removed were constructed entirely of 1x2 lumber and could be easily recreated. You'd want to use cedar or pressure-treated lumber for rot-resistance, if not a synthetic. All cuts are square. Some corrosion-resistant screws, properly piloted and countersunk, would make them solid. Trim-head screws or splitless siding nails would secure them well....


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