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1

I am not a wood person, but while aware all woods have defects and were visually examined and graded, I am leaning on the thought that some of the defects can get worse over time, especially splits, which depends heavily on the environment (too humid/too dry, too frequent moisture/volume changes...) and the cycles of loading/unloading. Would the worsening ...


1

The builder says "it's not uncommon to see these small cracks. It's wood after all. The I-Joist is designed with safety factor to account for these imperfections". He only has seen the photos and I suspect he does not want to perform the repairs (house was built 8 years ago). Yes, this person has an active interest in not being on the hook for ...


3

This type of floor support element is considered normally to be simply supported. What this means is that maximum shear force occurs at the supports and maximum bending moment occurs near the middle of the span. What does this mean for you? The web portion of the joist is what primarily resists the shear load. The flanges (your cracked part) are what ...


4

I would be concerned. The top and bottom sections that I-joist, the flanges are what carry the load. The bottom flange is in tension, and the upper flange is in compression (for a typical floor joist application). The ability of the lower flange to resist tension - being pulled apart - is what makes any I-beam work. A crack in the lower flange compromises ...


4

That bottom photo looks pretty bad. It reminds me of a “notch” in the bottom chord which is not allowed. Look on page 7 of their installation guide and you’ll see it is prohibited. https://p.widencdn.net/l6alxy However, you are correct that it will be difficult to repair. If you don’t have sagging floors, you may want to leave it alone. To see how much it’s ...


4

Disclaimer: I am not a structural engineer. I don't see anything seriously concerning on the cracks because they don't seem to be stress fractures that have compromised the I-beam. If you had a crack that ran the length of the board or cut anywhere but the grain of the board, I'd be more concerned. The beam as a unit itself seems intact. As far as sistering (...


0

Cracks in drywall can happen anywhere where drywall is connected to other materials. Temperature fluctuations result in different materials shrinking and extending in different ways, which causes stress and can cause the weaker material to crack. Rooms which aren't properly heated (like most garages) and thus experience greater temperature swings are of ...


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