Hot answers tagged

29

There is, or has been a leak - those come from plumbing or from the roof, or occasionally from a water spill on the floor above that was not cleaned up quickly. If you are quite certain it's not expanding, and you never see or feel moisture near it after the tub is used, or after a rainstorm, you could hire a painter and hope that it was from a one-time ...


25

You could use a piece of inside corner bead and finish it like any other inside drywall corner: A less aesthetic solution would be to cover the gap with a piece of wood trim and paint it to match the wall.


21

Jimmy's corner bead solution is probably easier and I upvoted it. The other method is to make a larger, more regular gap by cutting the present drywall and patching it with new drywall cut to fit the new gap. I will also note that this is, IMHO, an incorrect installation - the ceiling drywall should extend to the studs, and the wall drywall should butt up ...


16

Well this is a pretty big deal because we don't know the cause. First let's go over common reasons we get cracks on new floors. Soil wasn't properly compacted. Soil should be compacted with a rock bed on top. Bad mixing at site. Especially in the summer contractors pump too much water in the mix. The water makes the concrete weaker and it does crack ...


13

I'll assume that the hole is there because concrete was put onto unrammed gravel. The current state is left on the picture Now assuming you've got rid of the animals you have to stabilize the existing concrete and the gravel beneath it. The easiest way would be to excavate some of the gravel until you reach some stable foundation (I'd guess it's around one ...


12

Your crack is forming over and over because the steam pipe is getting hot, expanding, and cracking your plaster. The solution is to cut the plaster back about 1/4" from the walls of the pipe all the way around, then to cover the seam with an escutcheon that hides the crack. Example of a smaller escutcheon:


11

I don't think you are ready for a contractor yet. I would scrape that section and add some new drywall mud with a piece of tape and see if it cracks again. There are kits at big box stores for $10. I would then keep track of the area and your whirlpool usage. Filling a large whirlpool tub of water is a ton of weight - a lot more than the tub itself. ...


7

I don't see any reason why you couldn't use silicon caulking or why it would damage the surface. Just know that you will not be able to stain over it again. Some caulk is listed as paintable which might be a better bet as at least you can paint it down the road if you choose. If you are going to want to stain the door at a later date, a wood filler ...


7

You shouldn't be able to damage a concrete floor by jumping up and down on it. There will be sound transmission (as you've noticed) and there might be some movement in the floor if it's not properly tied into the walls. This would be more likely with a wooden floor supported by joists as there is more natural movement in wood than concrete. If there is ...


7

I'm going to say no on this because of how a windshield is made. They are a layered construction with glass on the outside and a plastic material on the inside. A small crack or chip in a windshield doesn't cause a structural failure - the other layers hold the window together. Resin can be injected into the glass crack and pushed against the other ...


6

You will need to smooth it out by applying increasingly wide applications of drywall mud; depending on how rough it is it might take 2-3 coats. You would then sand it smooth, prime and repaint the entire surface. Unless the drywall is water damaged or has significant physical damage (doesn't look like the case), you will not have to cut out anything. On ...


5

This looks like a crack caused by the wood drying and shrinking. Likely caused by dry winter air, although it's also possible that the wood wasn't properly dried before the bench was assembled. (Humidifying your whole house can help with cracks like this, but wood is a natural material and nothing will preserve it perfectly forever.) It also doesn't help ...


5

That should have never been grout, joints between walls and other objects should be caulked because movement in those joints will cause the cracking that you now see, and the cracking can lead to water getting behind the tile. This also goes for inside corners in a shower, and the joint between bottom of the wall and the floor or tub..


5

What's causing them? The building settling. Should I be concerned? Not really. How can I stop it from increasing? You can't, but improper climate control (swings in temperature and humidity levels throughout the house) will make it worse. How can I repair the damage already done? I'd use fiberglass tape and joint compound (chemically setting plaster; ...


5

If it is beneath the bathtub there is a fair chance that the leak is a result of a poorly sealed overflow drain. It is pretty easy to check, just run the bathwater above the overflow drain and see if you can hear a drip at the site of the crack or discoloration occurs. You can get a new overflow drain gasket at the local hardware store for somewhere in the ...


5

Sigh. Cheap builders are forever spending thousands on concrete, but unwilling to spend a few hundred on steel to make the concrete properly reenforced. Nobody sees the steel, but the lack of it does show up eventually. Unlikely to be a major issue, might be a path for water or bugs, so probably sealing it would be best. But consulting an engineer is good ...


4

To remove the animals I'd hire an animal control company to get rid of them for you. You could buy some humane traps and relocate the animals yourself but a) depending on where you are that might be illegal, and b) they're skunks! Check with your municipal government to see whether they can help with the removal and if not bring in the professionals. Once ...


4

You could patch up these cracks with an epoxy filler or a cement product type filler. In either case the filler will dry hard and be able to take the temperature extremes of your location. Repair such as this is going to leave tracks where the filled cracks were and will still be highly visible due to the surface texture that was originally applied to the ...


4

Since you already have to dig it up to fix it, don't bother trying to repair the crack. Cut out and replace the damaged section of pipe. Use a coupling suitable for the type of pipe you are working with and that is rated for burial.


4

Concrete slabs crack. Period. For this reason, "control joints" are often cut or tooled into slabs where aesthetics are a concern. They encourage cracks to occur along straight lines where they create less of a visual blemish and can better be accommodated by expansion joints in rigid flooring. In your case, it's not likely a concern.


4

I have had single pane glass replaced before typically it is quite affordable - I think last time my bill was $80. You just call glass people to do it. Even if you could use a resin which I suspect you couldn't in an aesthetic way - it never looks as good and would be a lot of work.


3

It is not possible to know if these cracks are structural or cosmetic, without knowing many construction and assembly details (such as the use of pre-stressed, reinforced panels). This is would be in the domain of a structural engineer. If cosmetic, an elastomeric, exterior grade concrete crack filler would be advisable. Sika products come to mind


3

The damaged area could have been the place the shower head pipe may have originally projected out of the wall. When the rain type show head was installed it may have been moved to a lower level. If this is the case then the damage that you see is just a shoddy hole repair. Fixing it up so that it looks decent will involve scraping, sanding and repainting ...


3

Consider using a paintable latex caulk. Apply a very small amount then work it into the length of the crack with a finger. Wipe off all excess with a damp rag or sponge, then paint. It is a good method requiring no sanding. If your ceiling is painted with flat (no gloss) paint, as most are, you will not be able to see it when you are done.


3

You don't fill in the gap between drywall in brick. Caulk, mud, plaster, whatever will not keep this area from having problems. I have done tons of drywall to brick and there is simply a small gap there. Anything else doesn't look right. I have also seen small t-molding placed there and it looks... OK but not right. I have seen caulk and it just ...


3

You can cut expansion joints with something like this: This is a walk-behind concrete saw that can be rented at most rental centers (I know that home depot has them). After the joints are cut, fill them with a good polyurethane caulking. I would wait until after you cut the joints before filling the existing cracks, as it's likely the work you're doing ...


3

Plastic models are made out of polystyrene. The cement that is used to glue model parts together melts the parts and forms a weld. It is not an adhesive and actually works much like PVC cement. Applied properly what you wind up with is a solid weld rather than a glued joint. Use sparingly.


3

If the cracked bricks are loose (as in when you wiggle them they move) they should be removed and new brick installed (or clean the old ones of mortar). If the cracked bricks are sound and secure the gaps should be filled ,as you noted, to keep water from further damaging the sill. There are many colors of concrete-type caulking, so if desired the gaps ...


3

This isn't a stellar answer because there's more information needed. But here's a start. First, your roof system is built with trusses, so the forces acting on the wood behave a little differently than classic stick framing. (For instance, some members are in tension; others are in compression.) In picture #1, the crack: it's not clear to me what function ...


3

That color around the crack means moisture. Maybe from a leak, maybe from being careless with kids in the tub, etc. What I would do, personally, is cut away the dry wall in that area, from one "beam" to the other in the ceiling, the entire length of the crack. As long as your area being cut out is less then one sheet of drywall, your not spending any "...


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