42

Remove that brass jumper, connect white to the middle terminal, red and black to the one each of the two end terminals and green to the ground screw.


28

It should be replaced. Electrically it will work but mechanically the sharp edges exposed by the burnt off plastic insulation could damage the new socket. Also the missing insulation makes it less safe.


23

Replace both the plug and the socket and don't use either until they're repaired properly. If you choose to use this burnt plug in a different socket, the carbonising will add resistance to the circuit, heating it up and damaging the second socket which then also needs replacing. The heat buildup can also start a fire, and there's a fair chance any Insurance ...


22

The jumper from neutral to ground is exactly what makes a 3-prong cord so dangerous. The jumper gets removed. The neutral wire lands on the insulated terminal (that was vacated) and the ground lands on the uninsulated end. I don't know if they provide a parking position for that strap to "live" when it is disconnected, but since 3-prong ...


17

That cord is meant to plug into a Japanese outlet. In Japan, it's common to have two-prong sockets with a separate grounding screw below for devices that need it. The outlet it was desinged to plug into looks something like this: To use your monitor in the US, simply replace that cord with a standard US computer monitor cord, an IEC C13 - NEMA 5. They're ...


12

REPLACE IT. <- that is all the answer should require....and you probably already suspected that.


12

Thank you for the photoshopped connection picture. Very impressive and helpful! Based on that information and illustrations I got here I ended up with what you see in the picture. I moved the ground connection to make it work with the cord I got. It works so I am hoping I did it right. I also hope the used GE dryer I bought will last for a year or two. Thank ...


8

That type of wire, along with the tab on 3:2 "cheater plug" adapters, is intended to go under the face plate screw at the center of the outlet. That screw makes a connection with the outlet chassis, to which its grounding screw connects. Of course, this assumes that the outlet itself is grounded via wire or metal conduit. source Monitor cords are ...


7

Simplest and most reliable option (no sliding contacts required) is a 1 foot extension cord (or a longer one, but 1 foot will get the desired degree of freedom.)


6

That's the maximum rating for the plug. It doesn't change anything about the current in your attached device. If you exceed that current for some reason, the plug will open the circuit for protection.


5

Sure, there is a mating plug: you need a L16-20P. The charger may not have come with a plug because it is built for different voltages/frequencies, meaning it is sold in other parts of the world that have different standards for their plugs and receptacles. NEMA sets the standards for plugs in the US, which is where the L16-20p standard comes from. Other ...


5

TLDR: you have an appliance that is polarized for safety. You are trying to plug it into an adapter that is not polarized (in or out). Get an adapter which is polarized. No, you cannot modify things like that. NEC 110.3(B). The polarized plug blade is supposed to be 5/16" (8mm) tall. Measure it. If it is taller than 5/16", then the plug is ...


5

Flip the electrical socket over Turn main breaker off, make sure both sockets are dead, 1 coverplate screw, 2 yoke screws, rotate 180, put it back in. Don't even need to take the wires off (actually: don't). Now your appliance cord is working as intended: giving a flush-to-wall socket that you can back furniture up against, yet allowing both sockets to be ...


5

Electrically it would function, but NEC only allows receptacle attachment for single room AC units, and gives specific conditions. The intent of the wording expects a through-the-wall installation so it may be difficult meet the conditions: 440.63...(1) the manual controls on the room air conditioner are located within 6 ft. of the floor, or (2) an ...


4

Is that too many layers of things where it can be a problem safety wise? The number of "layers" isn't a huge concern, no. As long as each individual component is rated for the voltage and current that will be present, it should be fine. That said, you might not want to use this approach as a permanent solution. The travel adapters are useful, but ...


4

I know exactly what you mean, those plugs are just a nuisance most of the time. @Ecnerwal's answer using a short extension cord is going to be the simplest and cheapest way to work around this. Another option - I will often re-terminate cords to get them the exact length I want, you could do the same to get a regular straight plug. A decent quality UL ...


4

So your plan is to move either the condenser or evaporator of your split system? That will result in needing to redo part of the refrigeration lines which is far from a trivial task. Doing a bit of electrical to disconnect the old location and reconnect at the new one is much easier in comparison to redoing part of your refrigeration lines. With a bit of ...


3

That is a twist-lock-style plug used with receptacles like this: Receptacles are still available - I have no idea if it's code-allowed to use them, they're not at all common in my experience. I would also be inclined to replace the plug for use with a normal common socket. Check the electrical ratings on the equipment for how many volts and amps it uses. ...


3

What you are looking at is the a terminal block where a telephone was once connected. The wire which disappears into the plaster wall goes to a larger terminal block where it joins the phone line from the street. These basement terminal blocks were originally quite large, like the one discussed in What is this electrical device in my basement? and installed ...


3

Without access to the inside wall, you have quite a challenge ahead. I've removed quite a few of these but from the inside, by pressing down with a screwdriver on the top "latch" while simultaneously pulling from the outside. In your situation, you have to compress the outer portion of the latch, ostensibly to get it below the hole in the wall, ...


2

Since the question is "why" I'll try to answer that at the risk of many irate downvotes .. because one, or the other, or both, is not quite to spec! I guess that's obvious. This question reminds me of the vast difference in design and engineering between American and British plugs and sockets. Two ends of the spectrum. The British ones with ...


2

Something not mentioned above and something I have experienced first hand... If you have a bad plug and it is powering something "electronically delicate" - you could fry something on its motherboard (PC, TV, Tablet - I fried the motherboard of a treadmill). Voltage or power dips or spikes will cause havoc on capacitors and other components.


2

I would expect to apply a 125% rating to the nameplate as a motor requirement, and NEC Table 210.21(B)(3) limits 15A plugs to twelve amps. I would use a nema 5-20 (20A/120v) or preferably a nema 6-15 (15A/240v) plug and receptacle.


2

Twist locks are a level above standard receptacles. There are 120v and 277v models the ground lug is on the opposite side of the ground blade I don’t see the fold but they are still indexed by width so they can’t be plugged in wrong. 4750 is 277v,, 4700 120v 15 amp. To convert to a standard duplex is fine like a 5362 receptacle and a 5266 cord cap would ...


2

Is that plug safe, yes when properly wired there is no issue with that plug. What would a best practice be when setting up a direct connection to a generator. Change the plug to the appropriate 3 wire twist lock. The old plug will work but with motor loads vibrations can allow the plug to work out of the receptacle moving the plug from one source to another ...


2

Yes it is possible. Be sure it is appropriate for the environment it is in. I would think it would much easier and cost less to wire it directly. You could mount the disconnect temporarily and leave enough wire on the feed so when you do the permanent install you have everything already there, just needing a bit of work.


2

Any 3-wire range connection has 2 hots and a neutral. There is no ground. This is a dangerous condition, because a simple, common problem with the neutral wire can cause the chassis of the range to be electrified! If you want to install a 4-wire receptacle, there are 2 options. Option 1. You can use a GFCI circuit breaker This is simply a matter of ...


2

First, you need to change that to a 4-prong socket (NEMA 14-30) and cord (and I bet the dryer came with a 4-prong cord). The 3-prong type is obsolete and dangerous. If the neutral wire loses contact, it will energize the chassis of the dryer - and I bet the washing machine is grounded, isn't it? :) It's a matter of time before you touch the equipment in ...


2

The red part is a fuse holder with a window to allow you to see the rating (13 Amperes) of the fuse mounted inside. The small gaps at either end of the red part let you pry it out to replace the fuse. Note that that is the rating of the plug/cord assembly. The monitor, per its specifications, will only draw 30W or about 1/8A as you have correctly calculated.


2

Is it safe to leave all light sets with their switches in the On position, and just use the mains switch on the wall to switch them all on/off at the same time? Yes, it's fine. That's exactly how light switches work and lights are built from day one to accept this usage pattern. This is true regardless whether the mechanism is a pull-switch, button, flip ...


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