42

Remove that brass jumper, connect white to the middle terminal, red and black to the one each of the two end terminals and green to the ground screw.


37

Since the damage is at the end of the cord, you can just cut off the chewed part, replace the plug, and lose a few inches of cord length. There is an endless selection of replacement plug styles at any big hardware store. A few things to note: This answer is focused on the plug style used in the US, Canada, Mexico, Japan, and some other countries. Plug ...


37

They are tamper resistant, as indicated by the letters "TR" stamped between the holes. The secret is to insert the plug squarely into the receptacle. The two little doors inside have to be pushed at the same time by the prongs of the plug.


35

Yes you can safely plug the appliance into a 3-wire cord and plug set, as long as that is the factory installed cord and plug on the router. Appliances that are double insulated do not require an equipment grounding conductor to earth because the live electrical parts are specially separated/insulated from the case in a way that prevents any single failure ...


34

That is a wired telephone junction block. The wire coming through the wall may very well be where the original land line entered the house from outside. The other wire is probably going off to some phone jack in another part of the house.


28

It should be replaced. Electrically it will work but mechanically the sharp edges exposed by the burnt off plastic insulation could damage the new socket. Also the missing insulation makes it less safe.


27

I'm not certain what guage that wire is but many manufacturers will cite a minimum bend radius. It may or may not be code compliance wherever you are in the world. I suspect that wire has a minimum bend radius between 1 and 2 inches. You can achieve that most easily by just rotating the receptacle. The wire will tail upwards, which will look strange, but it ...


23

Replace both the plug and the socket and don't use either until they're repaired properly. If you choose to use this burnt plug in a different socket, the carbonising will add resistance to the circuit, heating it up and damaging the second socket which then also needs replacing. The heat buildup can also start a fire, and there's a fair chance any Insurance ...


22

Let me introduce you to the wonderful world of Google Image search: nema 5-15 dimensions It's a great way to find drawings and other visual information. Here's a drawing pulled from the search results: Powercord CN Dimiensions are millimeters with a comma used instead of a decimal point. NEMA Website Following some image searches and regular searches ...


22

The jumper from neutral to ground is exactly what makes a 3-prong cord so dangerous. The jumper gets removed. The neutral wire lands on the insulated terminal (that was vacated) and the ground lands on the uninsulated end. I don't know if they provide a parking position for that strap to "live" when it is disconnected, but since 3-prong ...


19

If the power cord on the router is one of the modern type like this ... Picture Source ... with one blade wider than the other then you have a polarized plug with the neutral routed through that wider prong. You want to make sure to properly orient the plug at the extension cord so that the wider blade goes into the wider slot. Note that there are lower ...


17

That cord is meant to plug into a Japanese outlet. In Japan, it's common to have two-prong sockets with a separate grounding screw below for devices that need it. The outlet it was desinged to plug into looks something like this: To use your monitor in the US, simply replace that cord with a standard US computer monitor cord, an IEC C13 - NEMA 5. They're ...


16

In most cases, simple switches are equivalent. They break the circuit and do nothing else. So switching (breaking the circuit) further down the line is usually fine. There are some exceptions, such as dimmers, multi-position switches, and multi-pole switches, none of which seem in play here. The computer is different because it need to be shut down (...


13

The shell of the bulb socket (i.e. the part with the threads on it) should be neutral. There are many ways it's possible for you to be on contact with the shell: while handling a fixture, i.e. to keep it from falling or to steady it while screwing in a bulb using cheap LED bulbs with metallic heat sinks (many of them either bond the heat-sink to the screw-...


12

The ground prong is important. If a failure occurs that connects the hot to the parts of the vacuum that are supposed to be grounded, a functional ground prong means the circuit breaker trips. Lack of it means you get to play with electrocution. Devices that do not have a ground prong from the factory are "double-insulated" meaning that two separate failures ...


12

Thank you for the photoshopped connection picture. Very impressive and helpful! Based on that information and illustrations I got here I ended up with what you see in the picture. I moved the ground connection to make it work with the cord I got. It works so I am hoping I did it right. I also hope the used GE dryer I bought will last for a year or two. Thank ...


12

REPLACE IT. <- that is all the answer should require....and you probably already suspected that.


11

Well, you are the owner of a newer type of tamper resistant outlet. It's great to have a safe home, but I have been asked to remove these, as in other newer code required devices that cause problems, but they are code now, so only the home owner can do this. Try wiggling the plug back and forth to get these pieces of crap to open. In my personal opinion ...


9

It looks like an NF C 61-315 standard French single phase plug: These are are rated for 400V, 32A on a single phase. The socket you have pictured looks like a French style Schuko (CEE 7/3), which is typically only rated to around 16A. My guess is that unless you already have a socket that was intended for use with an electric stove, the wires are likely not ...


9

Check out the 1 or 2 gallon point of use heaters that install under the sink. They run on 120VAC and are fairly easy to install with minimal plumbing changes. There are also above sink mounted hot taps that mount into the sprayer hole in the sink. These are usually used for hot water for coffee/tea etc. Both of these type products are available at your local ...


9

Yes. It is possible. Keystone jacks almost always have two angled ledges. One stationary upon which the keystone pivots (Red below), and the other spring loaded which 'snaps' into place (Green below). Jam a straight blade in at the blue angle to push the green tab in, and pry it out. In 3by1 and 3by2 outlet plates, it's normal that they are too close ...


8

Originally, in the UK after BS1363 was introduced, there were 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 13A fuses but nowadays mostly 3,5 and 13 are used/available. The plug fuse is to protect the wire between plug and appliance, it is not primarily intended to protect the appliance (which can have it's own fuse or other protections). So the choice of fuse principally ...


8

A few things to add to the other answer It was probably an older 4-pin jack that went there. This was the forerunner for the modern (and considerably more compact) RJ-11 jack you would recognize. Interestingly enough, the wiring hasn't changed, just the jack. You can actually get adapters for them since some houses still have them Even though these are low ...


8

That looks like a DSL filter. DSL "piggybacks" on a regular voice line. The DSL modem will automatically block out voice frequencies. DSL filters are used on all connections EXCEPT the DSL modem to block DSL frequencies from the voice devices (phone, fax, answering machine).


8

Well, it's hard to tell. That part is called a "strain relief" but in these types of mass produced products, it's often molded onto the cord when manufactured. Unless the manufacturer sells a replacement part, it will be near impossible to exactly replace. There is a possibility that you could slide it off that cord, but will be difficult to thread your "...


8

That type of wire, along with the tab on 3:2 "cheater plug" adapters, is intended to go under the face plate screw at the center of the outlet. That screw makes a connection with the outlet chassis, to which its grounding screw connects. Of course, this assumes that the outlet itself is grounded via wire or metal conduit. source Monitor cords are ...


7

As already pointed out, yes you can. But maybe understanding the why will help: From this article, "https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/everyday-tech/question110.htm" "The idea behind grounding is to protect the people who use metal-encased appliances from electric shock. The casing is connected directly to the ground prong." So, chances are the device ...


7

They do make receptacles designed to fit round boxes, for example a Leviton 1228 (I'm sure other brands have it as well, this was just the first I found when I googled Round Box Receptacle): Depending in the screw holes on your box, you may also be able to fit a standard duplex receptacle and fit a wall plate designed for that purpose. These act as a wall ...


7

Simplest and most reliable option (no sliding contacts required) is a 1 foot extension cord (or a longer one, but 1 foot will get the desired degree of freedom.)


6

Yes to the plug, but you should also change the outlet if you can't get that prong out.


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