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32

I would inspect the entire property for more such pipe and replace any that was found. That's almost certainly a manufacturing defect and likely to be pending failure wherever that batch of pipe was used. That is not a natural crack, nor a corrosion crack, it's too straight and uniform. Typical "natural" cracks look like:     Possible ways it ...


18

Copper does erode over time through mechanical wear and chemical corrosion. My guess is that it simply got thin enough that thermal stresses popped the weld (or the extrusion resulted in a thin side, causing a very straight crack). I'd put in plastic and be happy.


14

Just heat the joint up with your torch, once the solder starts to melt use Channel locks to pull the fittings apart. Once the joint is apart, wipe as much old solder off as you can with a rag. Now you can start over. Clean, Flux, solder. You should not be applying flux to joints you are not working on, take each joint one at a time. If the joints are all ...


13

I have not seen patches hold up on copper. What I find best is to cut it at the hole and sweat a coupler on. It must be dry when you do the soldering or it will leak.


12

I'd use a small tubing cutter to cut tidy/clean ends on both ends of the 1/4" copper pipe ... ... cutting off whatever portions of the 1/4" copper pipe are kinked or deformed. I'd then slip on a compression fitting called a 'union' ... ... which requires tightening with a pair of wrenches. Wikipedia has a general article on compression fittings here. ...


11

When copper oxidizes, it first turns dark brown (like a copper penny), and then if left undisturbed into a somewhat moldy-looking green. This is normal. If you notice the pipe starting to deteriorate around areas that have a lot of green, this may indicate a leak in the pipe that is introducing more water into the area, speeding oxidation. Just keep an eye ...


9

How often does your heating system spring a leak? It's not particularly often in my (long) experience with closed-crcuit hot water heating systems - less than once per 20 years, I'd say, and usually with some outside cause. In general, it is a waste of money to remove/replace a system that's working. To address one of your "benefits" - where do you suppose ...


9

TAIFULONG E204798 FU AWM 3321 VW-1 IBAWG 150°C 600V FENG TAI ELECTRONIC. First, TAIFULONG is the cable brand. E204798 I do not know. The FU is actually “ЯU”, the symbol for the Underwriters Laboratories Recognized Component Mark: These are Marks consumers rarely see because they are specifically used on component parts that are part of a larger ...


8

In general, yes, stainless steel is more corrosion resistant than copper. It forms a tightly bonded oxide coating which tends to prevent further corrosion. If replumbing a house where copper pipes corroded (this is more prone to happen in some areas than others due to water chemistry differences) my first instinct at this point would be to use PEX plastic ...


8

The main problem, if any, assuming the solder band is complete and without flaws or gaps is if there's too much solder on the pipe and you cannot insert it into the fitting. The pipe is "tinned" or coated with solder, and there's nothing wrong with that. The usual approach to making sure that the coating is thin enough is to wipe it down (while the solder ...


8

Back in the 1970's the company that I worked for ran into a slew of copper tubing sizes through 3" that was manufactured with a defect that weakened the whole length of the copper. Since the copper was new the supplier replaced all the tubing (pipe) that was installed. This could be a similar problem. As "Isherwood" said, just replace it with plastic. I have ...


7

Copper (Copper) At about $20.00 per 10' 3/4" ($2.00/ft), may be the most expensive option. Depending on soil conditions, drainage, and bedding material used around the pipe, copper can corrode. Copper info. CPVC (Chlorinated Poly Vinyl Chloride) 3/4" schedule 80 CPVC will cost about $15.00 per 10' ($1.50/ft), slightly cheaper than copper and can be ...


7

Lot of bad info in this, to the point that it's comical. Don't need a MAP gas torch. Propane is plenty hot for normal sized copper piping (up to 3" or so). Wiping a rag on the fitting isn't needed, all that does is smear the solder that's hanging on the outside of the fitting around. Looks better, but it doesn't do anything else. Don't use too much flux....


6

Because all of these joints are really close together, you will probably have to redo them all. At a minimum you need to heat up the leaking joints and pull them apart, and then re-solder them. I doubt you are making them too hot, it is too hot if you get the copper glowing orange/red or if the pipe or fittings are deforming. I use a MAPP torch and my ...


6

Compression fittings do not use tape, so that's one mistake to fix. Tape seals a leak in threads, but a compression fitting is sealed at the ferrule, not at the threads. Leaks are frequently caused by over tightening, so this is certainly a possibility in your situation. Here are my suggestions: Replace the nut and ferrule. The ferrule gets deformed when ...


6

What you have is stranded #18ga tinned copper wire at the lights. This is completely typical of this type of light. Connecting that to #12 or #14 household wiring with the proper sized wire connector (wire nut or otherwise) is absolutely fine and SOP in the industry. I'm not sure where you go the incorrect information say this is not a good idea. The ...


5

Wire that is 8 AWG is just a smidgen over 1/8" in diameter. Copper wire is also a soft metal that actually bends fairly easily. The trick to bending wire into a shape is to bend it around an object using the object as a mandrel. If your project is similar to producing something like the following then I think you can bend the wire simply using the bottle ...


4

You need to use a listed insulating stovepipe anytime combustible construction is penetrated. These pipes are also listed to be enclosed by construction. Thus it seems acceptable to me to install the listed stovepipe and enclose it inside a decorative copper tube. For good measure, you should probably have some provision for venting the resulting annular ...


4

If you are talking about something the size of a splinter then you have no problem. I doubt if you shaved enough off to change the ampacity of the wire. The main reason not to use a knife (other than safety) is scoring the electrical wire and making it easier to break off. Wire strippers normally go enough of the insulation to make it weak enough to come ...


4

I did this very thing (replaced copper with PEX for baseboard heating). But I did this because my copper had frozen and split in about 200 places. So, if your copper is shot, I'd replace with PEX. But if the copper is fine, save the hassle! But if you do decide to do it, some tips: Sharkbite connectors are great and make it super easy to connect copper ...


4

If you can drain the pipe (heating it with water in it is mostly an exercise in futility), then yes, you could try heating it and adding more solder in place. (Which, contrary to your assertion, is not an especially bad idea.) If not, and you really don't have space to move things, usual practice would be to cut it out and install a "detour" loop -- two L's ...


4

This is not likely to be a major problem, but I can think of two ways it might cause trouble. One is noise, which can occur when the pipe moves due to thermal expansion or rapid water shutoff. Another is galvanic corrosion, which can occur when non-copper metals contact copper water pipes. Either of these issues can be easily addressed by placing a section ...


4

It depends on where the actual leaks are. If the leaks are at the solder joint, then this would indicate poor workmanship from the installer. If the pipes themselves are developing pinholes, then you could have gotten a bad batch of copper pipe that had impurities in it. Recycled copper used for pipes can have impurities in them which can lead to pinhole ...


4

Soldered copper pipes should never come apart,much less fall out. I would seek the advice of a licensed plumber. Small scale repairs to exposed connections are a medium level skill for DIY. Whole house replacement of supply lines are an advanced level skill.


4

Many years ago copper was the best way to seal corners and also used at the overlap on surrounds. Today we use membranes, Or thick pvc sheeting to protect the structure and keep the moisture in the shower.


4

I've had some success with this stuff - it's basically a fiber tape soaked in something like gorilla glue. But I'd only consider it a temporary repair. the right way is to cut the pipe and solder in a coupler.


4

You should consider something like this. These are just pieces I have laying around. All are common, easy to source and inexpensive. The fitting in your link will work as well, you would just follow with a valve and a air tool fitting. this is another way


3

I agree with lqlarry in that if it's just a small splinter/nick then there is likely not much risk. However, if the wire had a deeper nick or multiple cuts you would want to cut off the damage and re-strip the wire. The reason being is that damage to the wire increases resistance. Increased resistance creates heat, and heat eventually can cause fire. ...


3

See this thread about how much to tape to wrap. Two wraps might be too little while 20 seems pretty extreme. Some people like tape, some like compound and some like both. I gave up on reading about which is better because it just seems to be a matter of opinion. Both are for lubricating and sealing. The "Pipe Dope" has a substance in it (sometimes hemp) ...


3

As Ryan said you can solder it (either with soft solder or silver solder use flux will make your life easier to) or you can just use a rubber repair on it either buying a propritory type or just making it your self out of a piece of rubber and a couple of hose clamps. This is a plumb-quik from Fernco Keep in mind that you don't have to use the whole thing ...


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