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32

I would inspect the entire property for more such pipe and replace any that was found. That's almost certainly a manufacturing defect and likely to be pending failure wherever that batch of pipe was used. That is not a natural crack, nor a corrosion crack, it's too straight and uniform. Typical "natural" cracks look like:     Possible ways it ...


18

Copper does erode over time through mechanical wear and chemical corrosion. My guess is that it simply got thin enough that thermal stresses popped the weld (or the extrusion resulted in a thin side, causing a very straight crack). I'd put in plastic and be happy.


14

I have not seen patches hold up on copper. What I find best is to cut it at the hole and sweat a coupler on. It must be dry when you do the soldering or it will leak.


10

How often does your heating system spring a leak? It's not particularly often in my (long) experience with closed-crcuit hot water heating systems - less than once per 20 years, I'd say, and usually with some outside cause. In general, it is a waste of money to remove/replace a system that's working. To address one of your "benefits" - where do you suppose ...


9

In general, yes, stainless steel is more corrosion resistant than copper. It forms a tightly bonded oxide coating which tends to prevent further corrosion. If replumbing a house where copper pipes corroded (this is more prone to happen in some areas than others due to water chemistry differences) my first instinct at this point would be to use PEX plastic ...


9

Lot of bad info in this, to the point that it's comical. Don't need a MAP gas torch. Propane is plenty hot for normal sized copper piping (up to 3" or so). Wiping a rag on the fitting isn't needed, all that does is smear the solder that's hanging on the outside of the fitting around. Looks better, but it doesn't do anything else. Don't use too much flux....


9

TAIFULONG E204798 FU AWM 3321 VW-1 IBAWG 150°C 600V FENG TAI ELECTRONIC. First, TAIFULONG is the cable brand. E204798 I do not know. The FU is actually “ЯU”, the symbol for the Underwriters Laboratories Recognized Component Mark: These are Marks consumers rarely see because they are specifically used on component parts that are part of a larger ...


8

The main problem, if any, assuming the solder band is complete and without flaws or gaps is if there's too much solder on the pipe and you cannot insert it into the fitting. The pipe is "tinned" or coated with solder, and there's nothing wrong with that. The usual approach to making sure that the coating is thin enough is to wipe it down (while the solder ...


8

Back in the 1970's the company that I worked for ran into a slew of copper tubing sizes through 3" that was manufactured with a defect that weakened the whole length of the copper. Since the copper was new the supplier replaced all the tubing (pipe) that was installed. This could be a similar problem. As "Isherwood" said, just replace it with plastic. I have ...


6

What you have is stranded #18ga tinned copper wire at the lights. This is completely typical of this type of light. Connecting that to #12 or #14 household wiring with the proper sized wire connector (wire nut or otherwise) is absolutely fine and SOP in the industry. I'm not sure where you go the incorrect information say this is not a good idea. The ...


5

Wire that is 8 AWG is just a smidgen over 1/8" in diameter. Copper wire is also a soft metal that actually bends fairly easily. The trick to bending wire into a shape is to bend it around an object using the object as a mandrel. If your project is similar to producing something like the following then I think you can bend the wire simply using the bottle ...


5

If this is outdoors and possibly underground, understand that there are two types of hard copper pipe (as opposed to soft tubing); type L and type M. Both have the same external diameter so they both use the same fittings, but type M has thinner walls. It is for use where the pipe is going to be somewhat protected, as inside of a stud wall in a building. ...


5

This doesn't sound like a technical question. You didn't maintain the AL wiring properly... it had a problem... should you replace it? The real question is do you trust yourself to maintain it going forward? Same exact thing probably would've happened with copper. I do systems rollouts within enterprises, where you get employees to switch to a new ...


4

I did this very thing (replaced copper with PEX for baseboard heating). But I did this because my copper had frozen and split in about 200 places. So, if your copper is shot, I'd replace with PEX. But if the copper is fine, save the hassle! But if you do decide to do it, some tips: Sharkbite connectors are great and make it super easy to connect copper ...


4

If you can drain the pipe (heating it with water in it is mostly an exercise in futility), then yes, you could try heating it and adding more solder in place. (Which, contrary to your assertion, is not an especially bad idea.) If not, and you really don't have space to move things, usual practice would be to cut it out and install a "detour" loop -- two L's ...


4

It depends on where the actual leaks are. If the leaks are at the solder joint, then this would indicate poor workmanship from the installer. If the pipes themselves are developing pinholes, then you could have gotten a bad batch of copper pipe that had impurities in it. Recycled copper used for pipes can have impurities in them which can lead to pinhole ...


4

Soldered copper pipes should never come apart,much less fall out. I would seek the advice of a licensed plumber. Small scale repairs to exposed connections are a medium level skill for DIY. Whole house replacement of supply lines are an advanced level skill.


4

Many years ago copper was the best way to seal corners and also used at the overlap on surrounds. Today we use membranes, Or thick pvc sheeting to protect the structure and keep the moisture in the shower.


4

This is the same theory behind insulating the hot water pipes in attics in cold climates (freezing concerns aside). It'll help but only for a little while. It might extend your hour-long window of continued cold water to 2 or 3 (or more) hours, but you won't keep cold water all day long. If your attic is easily accessible, the pool noodle pipe insulation is ...


4

I've had some success with this stuff - it's basically a fiber tape soaked in something like gorilla glue. But I'd only consider it a temporary repair. the right way is to cut the pipe and solder in a coupler.


4

You should consider something like this. These are just pieces I have laying around. All are common, easy to source and inexpensive. The fitting in your link will work as well, you would just follow with a valve and a air tool fitting. this is another way


4

Sure, just turn the water back on and wait. Of course, that won't actually minimize the drywall repair work. But you'll eventually localize where the leak is. My actual approach would be to point out that a big drywall repair is barely any harder than a small one, so get over that misconception and rip away.


4

This is not aluminum, but tinned copper instead There is no reason to use aluminum at such small wiring sizes; what you see instead on such finer-stranded fixture wires is tinned copper. This is done to allow it to be easily used in applications where it needs to be soldered (say to a circuit board in a dimmer or fan receiver), and has none of the ...


4

A lap-soldered joint like that is good enough for low-voltage low-current low-risk electronics. But it has never been approved for The Big Stuff, and in fact, is unprecedented. There was a standard for soldering "back in the day"; and it coarsely resembles the Western Union splice. If you dismantle any old Knob-n-Tube that was soldered, it looks ...


4

Mice is how it happen. Mice have been chewing on the wire. You got mice. Can tape for now, but should replace cord as soon as possible. The large section seems like the wire(copper) has also been chewed. Less copper can mean the wire could heat up more. The two prong adapter is only good if the box the outlet is in, is grounded. The adapter works if a ...


3

When copper oxidizes, it turns green. Usually there has to be some kind of catalyst to cause oxidation. Potential catalysts include salt, iron and any kind of acid. Acid will form in water due to dissolved carbon dioxide. Usually if copper is getting green, it is because it is getting wet. In the case of a boiler, this could be due to water in a humid ...


3

I agree with @HerrBag that the joints should not come apart - but if you are up for some new skills, replumbing the whole house with PEX is well in the DIY realm (IMHO), and what I'd suggest, rather than trying to rework/replace copper with copper. Hmm - cottage - did the lines freeze, perhaps? I might also do a water test to see if the water is especially ...


3

Carefully dig it out (a garden hose may be useful for "hydro-excavating" right next to the pipe, otherwise some careful trowel and shovel work) and figure out where it does run, then you can decide what to do about it. Beware of possible other poorly buried items while you are digging (wires, etc.) Assuming you have to work with where it comes out of the ...


3

I agree with Wayfaring... You probably haven't structurally weakened the pipe, but you have created a flow restriction. If you can live with that, then so be it. But since it's on the hot side, it's very simple to isolate. Why not just turn off the valve to the water heater and replace the damaged section?


3

Your second question, To connect my Romex wire to my recessed light, can I use the connectors shown below? is unrelated to the first, hence the second answer. Typical house hold wiring standards have designated the color Yellow for a range of AWG sizes. Specifically for Twist On Wire Nuts: Yellow, Minimum: 2 conductors AWG 18 + 1 conductor AWG 14; ...


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