9

A huge disadvantage with PEX is that it is semi-transparent. If your water supply has nutrients in it and the PEX is installed so that light will get to it, you will find that algae (green), bacteria (black, orange or yellow) will grow inside it. It sloughs off in long, stringy goop similar to the biofilm that grows in diesel tanks that haven't been treated ...


9

Sometimes we put in up stubs, they fill with air and act as a surge arrestor (helps to reduce pipe chatter).


7

Is the manifold 3/4? If you have easy access to do it, then you are correct that now is the time to do it.


6

I'm guessing it's plumbing, not conduit. Unless you actually see wires running through the tubing, I'm not convinced it's conduit. In the US only certain types of conduit are listed for use, and I'm sure they are similar in Canada. Copper is not among those listed, so it's not likely it would be approved by an inspector. In a comment you mentioned that the ...


6

There is absolutely no difference between the materials used for hot and cold water pipes (at least there isn't in the UK!). The same copper is used for both and if you have a piece of pipe that was previously used for hot water you can use for cold water and vice versa. As long as the pipes are connected up properly then there'll be no problems.


5

Yes, it's possible to bench solder, and in fact you should generally avoid soldering on an assembled threaded assembly. "Oven soldering" is a completely absurd approach to plumbing. Save it for your SMT electronics projects. If you are very uncomfortable about soldering, just use threaded pipe (steel, brass, stainless steel...) and threaded fittings.


5

That fitting is called a union, it was installed to allow for the T&P and/or the entire water heater to be replaced without needing to cut and resolder the relief valve discharge line. As for the order of operations during initial installation, there really is no way to tell for sure. Assuming the discharge line exits the utility area where the heater ...


4

Fewer points of failure Bending results in fewer high risk failure points. A continuously bent pipe has 2 high risk failure points. Whereas a similar length of pipe made with a bunch of fittings, has 2 high risk failure points per fitting. Quieter Bending a radius will provide less resistance within the pipe, so water will flow smoother. In a ...


4

There are flexible hoses made for connecting to water heaters but they are usually only a few feet long and are only meant to make it easier to swap the heater for maintenance. They are also much larger, usually 3/4" size, because they are feeding the entire house. The hoses you show in the picture are 3/8" and are only meant to serve a single small fixture. ...


4

There are many examples of building products that claimed to be "the wave of the future" and turned out to be utter failures, sometimes dangerous. (polybutylene plumbing, aluminum wiring, and asbestos building products to name a few.) Despite the manufacturer's glowing claims, the actual long-term characteristics and behavior of PEX tubing cannot yet be ...


4

My sink has a hot faucet on the left side of the sink. It also has a cold faucet on the right side of the sink. If you want warm water, you have to mix it in the basin. If every faucet in your house is this way, then your problem is impossible. However, I suspect you have a valve newer than 1930, with a single spigot. Which means there is a chamber ...


3

You may notice a rotten egg odor from the water from time to time if the sulfur content is high enough. Bacteria in the water convert sulfur compounds into hydrogen sulfide which reacts with the copper to form a coating of copper sulfide. There are no set limits on how much sulfur can be in the water. It's naturally occurring and not considered to be a ...


3

With pex pipe you just need shark bite fittings . Don't require special tools for installation.. shark bite fittings are considerable more expensive than others but you can fix a leak without ever turning the water off if you like


3

We had blue water coming out of our bathtub faucet for a number of months. I talked to people at our local plumbing company. They had no answer. I gave up searching the blogs on the internet. This is what I did to solve the problem. Our gas hot water tank was almost 15 years old, past it's useful life. I bought a new tank. I first removed the cold water ...


3

SharkBite® only officially supports 4 types of pipe, according to the FAQ Q: What types of pipe can SharkBite fittings be used with? A: SharkBite fittings are certified for use with: Copper pipe hard drawn Type K, L and M and annealed Type M not to exceed 3/8 nominal, complying with ASTM B88 PEX pipe complying with ASTM F 876 or CSA B137....


3

There are products sold for your specific issue. Check your local hardware store or home improvement center for CLR (Calcium-Lime-Rust) cleaner. CLR is a specific brand name but there are many formulations of similar products available.


3

All depends on you. You can cut the pipe with a hacksaw, Sawzall, a copper tubing cutter like these: You might have to cut a length of pipe out to fit your valve. You could also use a piercing valve. I don't endorse these products although good.


3

My understanding is that plumbing flux is more aggressive (acidic) and will damage electronics, but that you can go the other way and use flux-core solder on plumbing in a pinch. A few caveats: Electrical solder is often a softer alloy, so it won't withstand pressure as well. Definitely flux the pipe fittings as you normally would. You won't get good ...


2

From comparing chart PEX vs Copper PEX tubing has much much better freeze burst resistance properties than copper. Its very important especially for people who lives in cold climate areas.


2

Get a pinch clamp tool, like this one, and a pipe cutter. Those are the tools you'll need. One tool works for all size pinch clamps. Copper has antimicrobial properties. Copper will oxidate and leak under certain water and electrical conditions. Copper that is not completely dry and clean cannot be soldered. Pex can be fixed underwater and covered in poo. ...


2

If you have the opportunity to replace your galvanized pipes, do so. It's an inconvenient project, involving opening up a lot of walls, but as you can tell from the comments, galvanized pipe is problematic at best over the long term. It will frequently develop (as is the case in my own home and in my rentals) pin hole leaks. The only good news with ...


2

Are there some specific reasons why people recommend bending long copper pipes, instead of cutting them into sections and joining them using U-joints, elbow-joints etc. ? Pipe fittings add resistance to the flow of the fluid in the pipe. This is usually expressed in terms of an equivalent pipe length for the different fittings (eg, elbows, tees, etc). For ...


2

Bending copper has to be done with annealed copper. Rigid copper is too brittle can be done with either drawn or annealed copper. This table from copper.org does suggest slightly larger minimum radii for drawn pipe. thanks to @UNECS for prompting further research. You can make rigid copper easier to bend successfully by heating the area of the bend with a ...


2

You branch off from the copper tubing with a 1/4" compression tee. Cut out a small section of tubing for which the tee replaces. You must use a tubing cutter to do this, any other method will cause the tube to become oval. Install the short piece removed on the side outlet of the tee. Attach a 1/4" compression x 1/2" pipe thread adapter to the short section....


2

I can think of two possible explanations: It could be brass conduit. These were once used to wire submerged swimming pool light fixtures. Maybe an electrician had some left over and used it where it wasn't necessarily required. It could actually be copper plumbing in a water-related use, such as to provide hot weather cooling for the roof above, or supply ...


2

Alright, I took another look and it was definitely electrical. There were junction boxes branching off to the ceiling lights. Turns out it's original 60's era conduit and not new; just in good shape. Since then, buildings standards and material costs have changed drastically making it uneconomical to use.


2

I'm not sure exactly where this pipe is, or how far back the pipe runs. Though most codes now call for a shutoff valve be installed for each appliance, in the same room and within 6' of the appliance. I'm going to assume that the piece of pipe you're looking to replace, runs from the shutoff valve to the appliance (this might be a terrible assumption, but ...


2

Clean it off with some wire wool. As far as I can tell, it looks like marking where flux has run and is unlikely to be any serious corrosion that warrants pipe replacement, but the best way to tell will be to clean it off and see the state of the pipe for yourself close up.


2

You use plastic bushings. I couldn't find a photo with pipe, but here's one with electrical: This gives you the benefit of separation of materials and also a 'slip joint' to handle the expansion/contraction of pipes so they're not making lots of noises rubbing against framing members. To attach the pipe to the stud, you can use pipe clamps like this:


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