Hot answers tagged

2

Yes, it can be done. It just needs to be plumbed (and wired) right. Each thermostat should control a valve that admits hot water to its section of the house. The boiler should be wired to fire up whenever either thermostat is calling for heat. For example, if the basement is cold, but the rest of the house is warm, then the valve allowing water to the ...


2

Simply set your thermostat to "fossil" or "gas/oil" mode Most thermostats out there support what you describe, as it turns out, as gas furnaces control their blower automatically by default, and only use the G terminal as an override to turn the blower on when the system is otherwise not running. So, simply set your thermostat of choice ...


1

The answer is yes, you can. You could ask why your system isn't working that way. You could start by looking at whether it seems to generally be intended to work that way, in which case something is wrong. If your system is meant to have two zones you should see the hot water pipe that comes out of the boiler split into two pipes, and each one should ...


1

I wish I could post this as a comment rather than an answer, but pictures aren't supported in comments, but here goes. This isn't a product recommendation, just an example of what might work for you. Most sophisticated thermostats have a LOT of settings for various types of heating/cooling configurations. I have in-floor hydronic heating and A/C on the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible