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To answer your question, the bottom of your footing needs to be a minimum of 12” below finish grade, where you live. However, I feel you don’t understand the complexity of this project so I’m going to layout a few issues you’ll need to resolve. First, this wall will weigh about 4,800 lbs. (plus weight of your stone veneer) so if it falls over it’s a ...


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Here's something: "Vintage magnetic scroll memo letter holder, desk accessory, menu sign stand, silver gray metal curve, home office organization tool " https://www.etsy.com/listing/463402573/vintage-magnetic-scroll-memo-letter?show_sold_out_detail=1&ref=nla_listing_details


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I don't know what it's called, but I know how they are made. It's a roll of spring steel, about 3 layers, unrolled, and then rolled from both ends. Your diagram was close, but not quite right.


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I'd start by pressure washing the ramp with a light degreaser/driveway cleaner to see what defects remained. Some of the colorization seems to be surface stains. Then, you could epoxy-paint or stain it to at least get a uniform look, though that wont help if there are large cracks, voids or holes. Problem with any coating is that you will be driving on it, ...


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After various discussion, it seems the best (most optimum) solution would be to apply a finish with tiles. Attempting to fix the visual defect of the raw work is not cost effective and unfortunately should have been controlled during construction itself. Porcelain tiles being said to be a good option for the purpose even though am not sure how they work ...


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That’s a lot of information to review, and I’m American so I don’t know anything about metric, but I’ll try... Your layout is somewhat different than that shown in the “full report” and picture in Section 1 at Zwae.... There the glass windows are in the same wall as your dormer AND at the same level. However, in your building the dormer is in a wall 90 ...


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A dumpster and a broom would go a long way toward just cleaning up the rubbish and debris. I am not so sure you would want to try to remove the retainer and separator walls along the sides. Those were put there for good reason and they could very well be helping to hold fill material under the sloping ramp in place.


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Pay a metal fabrication shop to make you one made out of 1/4" steel or 3/8" aluminum. The back plate will need to be wide enough to span 2 studs and tall enough to deal with the downward forces of the TV extended out to its fullest. You will need to know where the studs are in relation to center of the mount so you can have mounting holes drilled. ...


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I do work in the midwest where temp ranges between -10 and 110F. All concrete cracks is just a dumb myth. There are hairline cracks that are more typical. Mainly with suboptimal mix or not properly adding joints. However I have many pours over the past 10 years that have zero cracks because I basically use the best mix in the area and pay a good 30% more ...


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It's hard to say if it's a structural problem without more information. The crack in the photo is not necessarily a structural problem. Most likely it's related to less than ideal subgrade, concrete mix, control joint spacing, or concrete curing conditions. Concrete is always going to crack. That crack is excessive, but most likely not a structural ...


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