28

Look at it as a start on a foundation hole - but don't get hung up on "making the house the same size/shape as the existing hole" because you can alter the size/shape of the hole when building the foundation, on which you will put your house, of whatever size & shape matches your ideas and budget. You might feel more of an advantage to sticking ...


20

You asked: Would there be any problem to build the wood house over the hole, so as to cover it? So I am going to make the following assumptions: You would like to personally build the house There is no plan for a basement nor slab You basically plan to build the house on stilts Here are considerations: If you don't want your house to be crooked after 1 ...


6

Yes that appears to simply be set on top of a spacer which is then set on top of the buried box. You should be able to lift it off, with some effort, and also keep in mind that some adhesive or mortar might have been used to secure it. It looks like you should be able to remove the spacer under the lid and drop the thing down a few inches to make it flush ...


5

You don't say where you live but you will get things living down there. Rats, foxes, badgers for example. They will leave faeces and dead stuff. Make sure you have access steps and built-in lighting.


5

You have several challenges when adding many thousands of lbs. of weight to a roof system like that (which almost certainly wasn't designed with that use in mind): The ceiling joists aren't up to the task, as you know. The only real fix for this over a 24' span is to tie them to the rafters, which leads us to the next problem... The rafters are barely ...


4

I wouldn’t remove the posts. The posts have footings that support the loads from the beam. If you remove the posts and build a wall, you’ll need to install a footing under the new wall. I’d just build a non-structural infill wall under the beam.


4

In your case whether or not they screwed up is kind of a matter of interpretation. The claim that concrete always cracks is really BS. In my opinion (and the opinion of many others) the number 1 reason residential concrete cracks during curing is too much water used in the mix. It's possible to put down concrete that WON'T crack - do you seriously think ...


4

This gave me a chuckle. (No offense intended) Is the big steel beam running perpendicular to the joists a load bearing beam? It is a beam and the photo shows a load on it, floor joists, and all of that on a post. So YES it is load bearing beam. I will leave it to others more knowledgeable and eloquent to explain further.


2

I realize this question is very old. I'm answering anyway, as this is a thing that people commonly want to do! I'm about to build a water pipe shelving unit that features several closed rectangles. Since this will be a decorative item, I want to use the malleable black iron fittings (like you have), and not the "structural" fittings that appear ...


2

If you don't want to have this problem with the last connection, the other option is to use "structural pipe fittings" that clamp onto the pipe instead of using threads.


2

Anybody who has ever sailed even a small sailboat knows the amount of force in even a light breeze can be incredible. I would be very hesitant to ever put any sheet goods on a roof rack as the lifting forces can be significant, working to pull your rack off. Yes, you can tie the front and back down but if it isn’t done perfectly you are asking for trouble. ...


2

Does the sheathing connect to the top plate securely? If not, because of the shims, you will need to run screws from below through the lower top plate. You could use long hurricane clips instead. Photo courtesy HD Supply I have seen long screws run through both plates from below, just like you have from the top, just run them in.


2

Pay very close attention to the attic structure and how this hoist is attached up there. A minimal attic truss with only 2x4 cross members on the lower joists is not up for this. I'm not happy with it grabbing only 2 joists. (tell me you didn't just use drywall anchors? Drywall has 0 strength). I'd be happier to see it grabbing 4 joists. I'm very ...


2

This will most likely work if the body is as light as you say, but that seems like an optimistic estimate. When you start to lift, the board should tell you if it's going to be ok. By the book, this isn't strictly "safe", but I don't have a problem with self-engineered solutions. The one thing you have to remember is to treat the lifted object as if it ...


2

Consider Autodesk Fusion 360 which has a free hobbyist license that has full modelling functionality. It is a CAD program designed for working in 3D as its primary tool set. It can produce scale drawing PDFs, renders, and even produce G Code for CNC machines. It was easier to learn for me than SketchUp, but that might just be a function of how my brain ...


2

I've used sketchup for making plans and blender for 3D modeling.


2

Because the beam transfers load to the posts, and because the posts presumably have point-load footings under them, you'll need to replace the beam even if you build a wall. Therefore, replace the beam (and the posts, if you like), but a wall is pointless unless you want to divide the space.


2

If you want actual structural advice, hire an engineer licensed to practice in your location. For plans that are already engineered for your location, particularly for "agricultural buildings" you might want to consult with your local agricultural extension website, where you might find several hundred choices. The plans are commonly free (you already ...


2

I can't think of any window that offer support. The frames are typically too weak and cannot handle the weight. The common framing for a door or window has a king stud (full height), then a crippler stud (shortened to support the header), a header (similar to a beam) over the opening, and at the bottom of the opening is a single 2xx4 or 2x6 depending on the ...


2

I looked up ASTM-920 to see what Class-25, Class-35 and Class-50 meant. Turns out the higher the class the more flexible and more adhesive your final joint will become. If you need the flexibility, you may want to go to a higher class. There may also be a difference between the amount of biocide these caulks contain, allowing some to be more resistant than ...


1

Are you sure your steel beam is a W16X26? I doubt that beam needs lateral bracing, because that size beam will support about 31,000 lbs. per foot for a 20’ span. (That size beam can support my entire house and 3 of my neighbor’s houses.) Lateral bracing is required when a beam is fully stressed (or overly stressed) and you need to keep the beam from buckling ...


1

My recommendation would be to consult a structural engineer or building engineer. They can tell you everything you need to know and also draw up plans for the addition so you can apply for a building permit if necessary.


1

To answer your question, the bottom of your footing needs to be a minimum of 12” below finish grade, where you live. However, I feel you don’t understand the complexity of this project so I’m going to layout a few issues you’ll need to resolve. First, this wall will weigh about 4,800 lbs. (plus weight of your stone veneer) so if it falls over it’s a ...


1

I don't know what it's called, but I know how they are made. It's a roll of spring steel, about 3 layers, unrolled, and then rolled from both ends. Your diagram was close, but not quite right.


1

That’s a lot of information to review, and I’m American so I don’t know anything about metric, but I’ll try... Your layout is somewhat different than that shown in the “full report” and picture in Section 1 at Zwae.... There the glass windows are in the same wall as your dormer AND at the same level. However, in your building the dormer is in a wall 90 ...


1

I would use two or three "max brackets" with a simple wooden structure attached. Select the largest size that fits the depth you need (factor in the wood face plate thickness). I like black as they aren't so conspicuous. Mount these with three 5/16" x 2-1/2" lag screws each, into framing. Then screw 2x4 rails to each, on edge, and a 2x8 ...


1

It's hard to say if it's a structural problem without more information. The crack in the photo is not necessarily a structural problem. Most likely it's related to less than ideal subgrade, concrete mix, control joint spacing, or concrete curing conditions. Concrete is always going to crack. That crack is excessive, but most likely not a structural ...


1

There’s many reasons: 1) twisting, 2) cupping, 3) aesthetics. A larger board will twist more than a smaller board will as it dries out. As it dries out, the grain will shrink and a larger board will have a larger variety of different sized grain throughout (across) the board. This will cause the size of the gap between boards to shrink and enlarge as it ...


1

A damp proof course (DPC) is required “Under Floor Space” where there is evidence that the “water table rises to within 6” of the building perimeter or if surface water does not readily drain away from the building”. (See ICC 1807) Likewise, wood joists within 18” of the ground or beams and girders within 12” at the perimeter or under a building in a crawl ...


1

This is the solution I went with, one of two suggest by the inspector: The double top plate acts as a diaphragm to distribute load, so it needs to be solid. I used strips of plywood of increasing thickness to shim up and fill the gap. As Jack suggested, I also screwed up into the trusses from the bottom, and used hurricane ties on the truss I couldn't get ...


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