Hot answers tagged

8

Yeah, that's wrong. The inspector ought to know better; clearly does not inspect a whole lot of commercial installations. Gently stand up on the point and show him the code, and leave him a path to keep his ego intact (that is less than you pulling a bunch of pointless ground wires). That's part of negotiating. By the way, if you do pull the trigger on ...


4

The outdoor recep does not need to be a "GFCI Receptacle". It can be a plain recep that is GFCI protected from a GFCI device in the nice dry indoors where it'll last a lot longer. If able, I would stick another junction box on the interior. Now, they make conduit nuts, and chances are the outside box (if it's watertight) has a threaded hole. It ...


4

This sounds like you don't know much about conduit, and you're proceeding anyway, which will produce a homebrew hatchet job. Don't do it. Follow Code, and skill up as needed. PVC conduit must be buried with 18" of cover. If you don't want to dig that far, use Rigid Metal Conduit (RMC or IMC) which requires 6" of cover. Cover means dirt on top ...


3

No. Code would not allow it if it was a significant risk. Do be sure to properly tighten all the screws and threaded connections, but they don't just randomly break or "go bad." Or: Consider that when you use grounding wires, "one bad screw will break the path to ground", too.


3

Surface raceways will save you a lot of work in many situations, especially big raceway where you mount receptacles in the cover. You can add wires from the nearest receptacle on the same circuit to the new receptacle. These surface raceway products are expensive, some are very expensive, but it's not too hard to work with and you can get a great finished ...


3

The big home improvement stores have elaborate systems in place to determine what sells in each store and figure out what products will bring the best return with the finite space they have for inventory. There are lots of products that are very good or necessary that won't get a spot just because they are slow sellers. Other retailers / wholesalers / ...


2

Perhaps it's a local market thing but my local Home Depot has SCH 80 in stock now and I have purchased both sticks and fittings there in the past. In fact they have it in stock now: Electrical supply houses will also have this, usually in stock as well.


2

Yes, that's basically how it's done but there is a bit more to it. You have to replace the "downstream" wire anyway because it will not be long enough to make the connections to the new outlet and still reach the far end. This is why it's important to plan for where you need outlets BEFORE installing so that you avoid this situation altogether. ...


2

Congratulations. You have a bunch of 18-24" chunks of 3/4" conduit. You do not have 10 foot chunks of conduit. Unless you have mechanical plans (I've seen folks do small greenhouses with conduit) might as well cut them at the holes.


2

Don't make it harder than it is :) Nothing easier At the last junction box before your planned box (or the first one past it, or wherever, really)... knock out one of the knockouts that faces your planned box. (Or is 90 degrees to it). Extend some new conduit out of that knockout (using an LB, LL, LR or pulling elbow to round a 90 corner if need be). Mount ...


2

Don't use flexible conduit for your application. PVC is very easy to bend. I use an electric heat gun like the kind you use for stripping paint. The great thing about bending it is those bends remain water-tight and save you money on couplers. If you decide to do a conduit-coupler-conduit connection you don't need a threaded connection with gaskets. You ...


1

If installed correctly they shouldn't loosen on their own. That said, my inspector too said he wanted to see grounding wires landing on the boxes in addition to the continuous EMT. Apparently, there are at least RUMORS of bad installs causing breaks in the EMT over time. I ran both EMT and the green ground wires, and ended up getting a different inspector ...


1

You have spelled out exactly what you need to do. There is no way to add the junction box without removing the wire and then cutting the conduit. The main issue is protecting the wire from any damage. You will probably have to replace one end of the wire because because there won't be enough slack to extend the wires 6" from the new box to connect up ...


1

First off, you're not allowed to assemble conduit around cable. It has to be a continuous run assembled to specs. You'd be surprised and how many bends you can pull through with stranded THHN wire when you need to replace it. If you know the cable is bad, you might want to think about replacing it now while you're doing all the rework. Just a thought.


1

Some great suggestions and I did get a shorter 5' piece of the 2 1/2" IMC threaded and did exactly what Freeman and Ecnerwal suggested. But to answer my original question: Answer: The final top section of IMC conduit needs to be securely tied to the structure by at least one strap/tie. This means the coupler will need to be (at least) ~6" below ...


1

Why not simply flip the riser upside down, so the 3' section goes directly into the meter/main, and the 10' piece goes up through the roof into the weather head. That way you can easily get two clamps between the coupler and the roof line, securely holding the 10' piece, and 1 clamp on the 3' piece between the coupling and the panel.


1

UF-B in conduit is a nightmare. You can't fit even one 6/3 UF-B into a 1-1/2" conduit. One 6/3 UF cable requires 2" conduit. Two 6/3 UF cables require 3-1/2" conduit! Since 3-1/2" conduit is required, 1-1/2" conduit is right out :) Your only option is to have a junction box at each end of the conduit run, and splice from UF to THHN ...


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