6

2*1x or 1*2x would be the same, but 2*1x with an air gap would be better than 2x by itself. Same principal as double pane glass; trapped air slows the transfer of heat.


5

The short answer is this: it makes no sense for a sealed combustion appliance to intentionally leak exhaust gases to the building interior. There was probably a legitimate reason for the hole to be drilled -- maybe there was a need to measure the pressure inside that pipe to assure the installation was okay, or as part of the troubleshooting of a "blocked ...


4

Are the walls wet? If not, then a mirror the same temperature as the wall it's mounted on will also not be wet, as the water is not condensing on the walls. If the walls are too cold and the water is condensing on the them, then it will condense on a mirror mounted on them, since that will also be too cold. Constant fogging is primarily a problem (in my ...


2

if the mirror is at room temperature it won't fog at less than 100% humidity. This may require good insulation behind the mirror,


2

Insulated flexible plastic ducting is a common item available at any big box hardware store. Unfortunately not so much for preinsulated flexible aluminum ducting. Sometimes code prohibits the use of non-metallic flexible ducting (for example often with range hood exhausts) First I would check whether non-metallic ducting is allowed for your bathroom exhaust. ...


2

The "lift" specification of a small pump is the height to which it will raise water above itself. It is another way of specifying the pressure that the pump produces at its output port. It is not a specification of the distance over which the pump will deliver water. As your ceiling is eight feet high and the Mars-21786 can raise water up to 16 ...


2

Combustion of hydrocarbons always produces water vapor. Air provides O2 oxygen and other stuff which combines with the CH chains to make CO2, H2O, and whatever else. When the heater operates there will always be water vapor present in the exhaust duct; whether or not it condenses to liquid depends on many factors. A significant factor is the efficiency of ...


1

If you are set on PVC then it is probably best if you remove the wood casing and install new PVC casing. It will be as much (or more) work to hack something on (and may look hacked). Starting over will end up being better looking and easier. There are multitudes of "How to Case a window" videos on the YouTube. ( watch many not just one) Here is ...


1

Adding plastic or aluminum on top of a wooden windowframe is likely to just be an ugly mess and may rot the wooden frame by trapping moisture. Accept that you may need to paint them once in a while, they'll probably last longer just painted.


1

If the ducts do not have sealed air spaces at top and bottom when the ducts get cold the air around it becomes cold. Cold air is denser and heavier so it drops, pulling in fresh humid air from the attic or other airspace. As the air cools with the moisture condensing on the duct and it starts all over again. Sealing the areas the ductwork goes up the walls ...


1

I believe you may have a charge related problem. When ac systems start having icing issues they stop effective cooling a low charge can cause ice to form on the evaporator high moisture in the air you see , sometimes with severe icing it takes hours for the ice to melt, the system may run ok for a short period of time then start icing up. A simple recharge ...


1

In order of preference I'd probably call these folks: A trusted handyperson (likely least expensive) An insulation contractor (likely most knowledgeable, but more expensive) A building or remodeling contractor (certainly capable, but probably most expensive) You don't really need any particular credentials. You just need someone with a brain in their head ...


1

That material looks very similar to what I used to cure a condensation problem with my air ducts. I live in a humid area and the attic is not insulated from the outside. So using the a/c would cause condensation to form on the ductwork and drip on the drywall below. Your situation sounds similar. If you line the metal roof with that material, it should ...


1

In general, high moisture levels can be reduced by exchanging the room's air only during night, best time in the morning before sun rise. Best method would be to open 2 windows at 2 different walls of the apartment/building, west and east sides would be the best option. If there is a noticeable air flow, just 1-3 minutes are enough and should not be ...


1

We had insulated the heated attic area with rock wool. After the winter, mold had formed on the wood. The reason was ice crystals between the wood and the rock wool. When thawing, the moisture has accumulated more and more on this layer. However, I don't have 2 cm PUR insulation on the outside. This certainly reduces the problem of condensation on the wood ...


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