31

By way of example, the pink Owens-Corning FOAMULAR 250 product and the blue DOW STYROFOAM Brand SM product rated for 25 and 30 psi compressive strength respectively. If weight is distributed and applied evenly a square foot of FOAMULAR 250 could support 25*12*12=3600 pounds at its limit while the STYROFOAM could support 4320 pounds. A footnote in the data ...


27

Unless your home is a 20 bedroom mansion I would simply tell them to keep that off your driveway period. You can't tell what load it will take because it depends how packed it still is, what condition it is in and how thick it was poured (and if this was uniformly done). Often these large trucks will crack driveways in the corners of their pours since ...


13

With the epoxies I have used minor imperfections like small divots from a heavy object chipping the floor are usually filled in. The epoxy can make a very slick surface. For instance, I coated one bay of my shop that I do automotive work in and wanted it like glass so oil spills were easier to clean. This worked great until I spilled some antifreeze. The ...


13

Shouldn't be a problem at all - look in your local hardware store for masonry bits and concrete wall anchors.


13

This slab is small enough that you should be able to easily lift it out and repair the base soil. Unless the concrete was weak initially or in otherwise poor condition it won't break. From the lawn side, trench along the slab about 6" wide and to the bottom of the concrete. Save the sod by wrapping it in a tarp. Using heavy steel or wood bars and some ...


12

The information is incorrect, the temperature at which concrete becomes unsafe for re-use is significantly lower, 570 degrees F actually. The 'telltale" sign is if concrete that was not charred from nearby combustibles turns a pinkish hue. That color change is due to chemical changes in the iron-containing compounds in the aggregates used in making concrete ...


10

Shaving some slivers of wood to take up the slack will work OK today, you probably won't achieve the rated holding power, and before long the wood will deteriorate and the plug will come loose. So don't do that, especially if it's something critical where a failure could do damage or injure someone. You could use an epoxy that is rated for metal and ...


7

I have seen copper pipe have small pin holes on several occasions. If your pipe is copper and in contact with the cement this may be the cause. The only way to repair is to replace that section of pipe. When I do this kind of repair I make sure to use thick wall copper because it will last longer than thinwall.


6

You have several issues: 1) Hold your building up, 2) keep your building stable (lateral stability) 3) freeze/thaw, 1) I would be careful to calculate the number of piers required to support such a heavy load as a log cabin. The piers have a small bearing area (perhaps as small as 12”x12”) and your load is tremendous. The benefit of a continuous footing ...


6

Obviously rust isn't a good thing. I don't seen enough here for immediate concern, but eventually you'll need to replace them if action isn't taken. Since they appear to be sitting on the slab, as opposed to being embedded in it, you can easily replace them with screw-type floor jacks. They aren't terribly expensive, and you could use a bottle jack and a ...


6

You can rent a core drill for under 200 dollars including the dimond bit. You would need to make a substantially larger diameter hole than the pipe because you need concrete around it, not just in it. This is a picture of a very serious bollard https://www.concreteconstruction.net/how-to/creating-a-bollard_o If you are really worried about a teen driver ...


6

Concrete is strongest when the mix is as dry as possible, and weaker when the mix is wetter. A highly liquid mix is therefore almost always a bad idea. This is well understood/documented/tested in the industry, tends to be poorly understood by homeowners and some of the less educated pros. Likewise, the importance of plenty of water for the curing process ...


5

Water infiltration can come from 1) subsurface water, and 2) surface water. Subsurface water can come from a rising water table or from hydrostatic water rising up through the soil. Rising Water Table: You indicate the building is located above the water table. That may be true under normal conditions. When an extreme rain event occurs, the water table ...


5

Wow, this is complicated. Good road design requires a good base and any turns require an added width due to a turning vehicle. (The added width at turns depends on the size of any anticipated vehicles.) Let’s start with the basics. Let’s say it’s straight and it’s 10’ wide. Depending on soils conditions, I’d use a minimum of 6” gravel base. I like 3” minus ...


5

with ease 5/32" is just 1/32" smaller than 3/16". My guess is that, either due to a really good hammer-drill or relatively soft or brittle surface, you drilled the holes a little too big. If the location of the holes is critical (i.e., have to be where you already drilled) then get some larger screws - e.g., 1/4". If the location is not so critical then ...


4

Faced with the same dilemma I went with French/trench drain in front of the garage. It fixed the water issue and really wasn’t hard to do with a diamond blade, skillsaw and pick. The sections of drain were $40 each and the blade was $15. It would have taken several bags of leveling/topping cement at $15 each plus renting a float and I don’t have the same ...


4

You'll definitely want to protect the surface of your concrete. I assume that the ground is not frozen. Since the curing process actually generates some heat, only the exposed layer is vulnerable. If it freezes, less water is available to the chemical reaction. This can result in a dry cure, leaving you with a weak, powdery surface. Cover the pour with ...


4

If you live in a colder weather climate (though your picture indicates that you probably don't due to plants showing at this time of year, and it's not a freeze-proof sillcock), you may have an inside shutoff valve to that outside faucet. If you do have an inside shutoff valve, you could turn that off for a couple days and see if the dampness reduces or ...


4

Curved concrete drives and walkways are no more likely to crack than rectangular. I have a semi circular drive and a curved walk. The drive foundation was well packed and it has 1/2 rebar on roughly 18' centers ( we had some left over from the house) , it has handled 10,000+ lb. trucks, no problem . The walk, not so well packed and used only mesh : It has ...


4

This can be done with wireless smart bulbs (or fixtures) and a remote switch in place of your current light switch. I'm going to describe how to do it with the Phillips Hue series, since I'm more familiar with them, but other brands will probably work just as well. For the lights themselves, if you have not already bought the fixtures, you can get Hue ...


4

Does the fence need to be solid for privacy? If not, consider a chain-link fence. You set the poles, unroll the fencing along and attach it to the poles with wire clips, then if you want to avoid having it sag, you run a pipe or just a thick wire along the top through eyes on the tops of the poles. When you get to the end, you rent a come-along fence puller ...


4

Insulated slabs usually have vapor barrier underneath. Since you did a test and found no moisture, there should be no problem installing vinyl flooring on it.


3

Always, and I mean always, make sure that the surface you are putting epoxy on is Clean (e.g. free of any dust residue or particles) The floor needs to be passed at least once with a floor grinder so you can achieve a professional smooth finish. If it's dyed epoxy, i'd suggest contracting it out. Don't mess up your floor; epoxy is unforgiving!


3

Honestly, I don't think you can. The problem is railings such as this rust from the inside out. The outside gets primed and painted while the inside never gets any kind of treatment. Aside from using solid "tubing", which is unrealistic, the only other thing I can think of is to "try" to treat the inside of the tubing in areas where water can seep up in to ...


3

Some issues to consider: 1) steepness of ramp, 2) structural support, 3) design of bottom edge, 4) mix design. 1) In the U.S., we can’t exceed a ratio of 1:12. That is, 1cm of rise requires 12cm of run. Also, it requires a handrail. 2) Concrete weighs about 150 lbs. per cubic foot. Whatever supports the “concrete floor” will also need to support the ...


3

You want to pour a slab of 40 square feet (so something like 5 by 8) and four inches thick. Let's break it down with numbers: I'm imagining about 1 bag per square foot, so you want approximately 40 bags (that might be a conservative estimate for 60-lb bags). You mention a concrete-mixing device which you roll back and forth several feet in order to mix. I'...


3

The answer depends on your level of physical ability and ambition, and is therefore mostly subjective. There are plenty of folks who could do it. I wouldn't try it myself at my age and level of fitness. Concrete is really freaking heavy. I would want some additional labor on hand. I attempted to finish a sidewalk and garage apron on my own when my help had ...


3

Thanks to all who provided suggestions in comments/answers - I've actually succeeded in getting it out before having chances to try them. They'll definitely come in handy in the future I think though - and the muriatic mention from Shimon will definitely be useful as I wasn't aware of it and the ability to etch concrete could be very handy! Plus it would ...


3

I made an account because I saw this question, First I hope I don't forget and never come back here again, and second, depends on many conditions. I have experience working for 5 different company dealing with protective coatings, specifically, or managed that department. Most only lasted a year or so, except one 6 years, because it paid the best and was the ...


3

I don't think you'll find anyone that recommends mixing concrete in the hole - you can't really be sure of a good even mix this way - but people do it for fences and other posts all the time and it seems to work OK. With 90% urbanite (recycled scrap concrete chunks) I might want to be a little more careful, an unevenly mixed section could weaken the post ...


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