50

A 1.5" hole (38mm) in concrete is beyond any conventional drill. You might get away drilling empty block, but not a foundation. I'd suggest renting a big rotary hammer drill driver for this job. Most rental places are happy to rent you a suitable bit for the task as well, on the basis if you didn't have the tool you're unlikely to have the proper sized ...


43

Slab on grade is probably the kind of pour you are referring to. The problem is only partially one of lifting the slab, the other half is having the slab rest again on the grade. These kinds of concrete pours fill all the irregularities of the ground they are poured upon. If one could lift the slab without slab damage, the setting of the slab on a new ...


35

The hammering action of the drill isn't activating So the bit is overheating due to friction. It is supposed to hammer the material you're drilling into dust then evacuate it, not rub it off through friction. You have to activate the hammer action. Pretty much the only use cases for not using the hammer action are when drilling into ceramic tile to avoid ...


35

Yes, there is a very good reason. If you add water to dry mix in the bottom of the container, you get a nearly impossible to incorporate glob of the dry mix at the bottom. On the other hand, if you add it from the top, it's much easier to get it all incorporated. This works with everything from pancake mix to drywall compound. Try it each way and you'll see ...


34

More important than the power rating is the type of hammer drill. This is a very useful link which explains the full difference between a 'Hammer Drill' and a 'Rotary Hammer'. The former achieves the hammer action by spinning a bumpy disk against the end of the driveshaft of the chuck, which makes is vibrate a bit. These are OK for soft brick, but not much ...


30

Hire a core driller. Trust me and do it. You will regret doing this yourself and the cost will seem like nothing in comparison to your struggles with drilling a hole that size in solid concrete. probably cost you 200 bucks. You can rent one from a tool rental company, or even from home depot.... https://www.homedepot.com/tool-truck-rental/Small-Core-...


22

If you are using a core bit with a shaft for which there's an extension, you'd probably have thought of that already. As far as I know there's no extension available for SDS plus or SDS max shanks. There are extensions for the "rope" threads and for the 5/8" and 7/8" threads on diamond core bits. The John Henry method is to drill as far as you can, then ...


21

I am not sure why they would tell you that it may ruin your drill. It might not be the most powerful hammer drill but it should be up for the job if you take the time to do it in stages. If you cannot rent and you do not want to buy a more robust hammer drill you’re only left with one option. I would start with a 3/16 inch masonry bit and see how that goes....


20

If there is an upstream GFCI device protecting that outlet it is fine. See if any other outlet in the kitchen has a test and reset button, when you test it and it trips does the outlet by the sink also lose power? If so then the outlet is protected by the GFCI. The GFCI device can also be the breaker in the panel feeding the circuit. So check there as ...


18

A healthy 6" slab is probably robust enough to handle quite a bit of movement without cracking. You just need to lever it around, not lift it. (Maybe that's what you meant.) Clear all material away from the slab in the direction it's to be moved. Pothole at several locations on the "push" side of two corners about 12", tight to the slab. Insert a 6-foot ...


16

One way to raise the floor, and possibly the most reasonable cost wise, is to install what I would call sleeper joists sitting the top of the existing subfloor and than add new subfloor covering over those. These "sleeper joists" would be installed as 2xX material on edge. This could be 2x6 planks spaced 16" apart. It may be necessary to rip the 2x6 planks ...


15

Use a diamond core drill to get a nice clean hole. If you use a hammer drill and carbide drill bit the concrete on the opposite side is going to splay and look like like a beaver was chewing on the wall, not professional at all. You can rent the core drills at most commercial rental places and you will be through the wall in a matter of minutes with a nice ...


15

I put some posts into concrete - made a dry mix and tamped it down. Next day it was just about done - the mix absorbed moisture from the surrounding soil and was fine. If you need a really smooth top surface then adding a wetter screed is a possibility.


14

From Chemistry: "Do like you oughtta: add acid to water" . Besides the "glop" problem mentioned in the answer, there is almost always released heat when dissolving something in water. If you start with lots of reagent and little water, the water may boil, leading to rather undesirable dispersal of hot reagent.


12

I have extended drills for one-off jobs by soldering (or welding / brazing) a piece of pipe (of a suitable diameter) to the end of the drill and putting an old drill into the other end of the pipe for the drive end. Need to go slow as they tend not to be perfectly straight :) but have got the job done...


12

Unless you are in a extremely dry area this is fine. The concrete mix will absorb moisture from air and surrounding soil and will slowly set. Usually a couple of days is all it takes. Some rain or a bucket of water will speed up the process, but isn't really needed. In fact, poured concrete is more in danger off being over-saturated with water, which ...


11

This is a common technique for setting posts in the ground. Here is a video from Quickcrete that explains how to do it: Quickcrete Dry Mix Post Setting


10

I call them "pin anchors" but I think they have a longer actual name like "mushroom head drive anchors". The anchor is set by driving with a hammer, but can be "un-set" by unscrewing the pin because it has a twist thread on it. Just unscrew then pry out.


9

It depends on the year the house was build. The requirement for GFCI protection within 6’ from a sink was adopted in the 70’s. The protection may be in the breaker panel if the home is newer, the breaker will have a test button. If your house was built prior to the GFCI requirement you can replace that receptacle with a GFCI receptacle and meet current code. ...


8

That's not a hole. That's just the bottom. Steps like this are poured on the dirt, and while the dirt level probably should have been flatter and lower (for aesthetic reasons), this isn't a structural flaw. Attempting to patch it will make things worse, visually speaking. Put some mulch over the bottom edge or raise the soil level a bit and be happy.


8

For a bore hole that large, your best bet is a water-cooled diamond bore. There are many rental centers that can rent you the tool and the bore.


8

An SDS-plus hammer drill will make holes very fast using a bit that starts hardly sharp and rapidly becomes completely dull. It really doesn't care, because it's a pneumatic hammer action and the rotary action is just to clear away the dust. (It also works with masonry chisel bits if you turn the rotation off. An "ordinary" hammer/non-hammer drill had a ...


8

The hammering action of the drill linked in the picture doesn't really need anything more than turning the dial to the hammer setting - it doesn't selectively "activate." It should be pretty noticeable but nothing that's going to bounce you out of your shorts. The mechanism is usually something like two plastic poker chips rotating, which gives you some ...


8

Absolutely, but hammering won't work very well with that much mass. You can simply flex a stout board, like a 2x10, downward, then release it. The straightening action will push the wall. Leapfrog a couple of them so that one is always holding position. A couple caveats: Concrete is insanely heavy. Expect it to fall the wrong way and be safe. Have a solid ...


6

Concrete is strongest when the mix is as dry as possible, and weaker when the mix is wetter. A highly liquid mix is therefore almost always a bad idea. This is well understood/documented/tested in the industry, tends to be poorly understood by homeowners and some of the less educated pros. Likewise, the importance of plenty of water for the curing process ...


6

mortar is not really structural, I would go with steel, perhaps half-inch plate and some washers


6

I have used a combination of construction adhesive and concrete nails. Doing it by drilling and an insert or a concrete screw would be awesome but that is really going to take some time


6

I did this once. All of the previous answers are valid, but if you're trying to do this through an 8" or thinner concrete wall "on the cheap", don't mind investing a significant chunk of time, and have some DIY skills and access to, or funding for, some modest tools, you can do the following: Get a 1/2" variable-speed hammer drill, a 1/4" carbide-tipped (...


6

The orange stain is likely an iron ochre infiltration due to high levels of iron in the soil or pre-existing iron in the cinder block. More info The paint is simply making the orange much more visible than it was on bare cinder block. I highly advise reading this article on basement finishing before continuing to paint your basement. You will likely have ...


6

Make sure you have not accidentally set the drill in reverse mode. When the bit rotates the wrong way it causes the bit to heat up and wear out. Something similar to this happened to a friend and to myself.


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