35

Yes, there is a very good reason. If you add water to dry mix in the bottom of the container, you get a nearly impossible to incorporate glob of the dry mix at the bottom. On the other hand, if you add it from the top, it's much easier to get it all incorporated. This works with everything from pancake mix to drywall compound. Try it each way and you'll see ...


14

From Chemistry: "Do like you oughtta: add acid to water" . Besides the "glop" problem mentioned in the answer, there is almost always released heat when dissolving something in water. If you start with lots of reagent and little water, the water may boil, leading to rather undesirable dispersal of hot reagent.


2

"Pressure treated wood" isn't one thing. It's many things. Some is rated for ground contact or below grade use. Most isn't. You'd need lumber that is. You won't keep it from getting wet underground, but you can keep it from being constantly saturated by giving the concrete sleeve a drain at the bottom. One strategy is to set the post on gravel and ...


2

The form ties are steel. So, a masonry ("carbide tipped concrete twist bit") drill is exactly the wrong thing to drill them with - that's what you use to make holes in concrete, which is not what you are trying to do (however absurd it may be to try that - I agree that this is a VERY strange and impractical thing to try doing.) That type of bit ...


1

For wood in contact with masonry or concrete, the Code requires the use of an approved species and grade of wood such as decay resistant heartwood of Redwood, Black Locust, or Cedar or pressure treated in accordance with AWPA (See ICC R319.1) in areas subject to decay damage according to Table R301.2(1). In the U.S., all but the very very most southern ...


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