50

Lay the steel plate on the concrete where you want it. Draw a line around it. Cut a piece of paper to the same size as the steel plate. Place it on the concrete in the same position as the marked outline. Locate the concrete holes by gently pressing down where you think they are (tracing paper makes this even easier). Poke a hole through the paper at ...


50

A 1.5" hole (38mm) in concrete is beyond any conventional drill. You might get away drilling empty block, but not a foundation. I'd suggest renting a big rotary hammer drill driver for this job. Most rental places are happy to rent you a suitable bit for the task as well, on the basis if you didn't have the tool you're unlikely to have the proper sized ...


43

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


43

Slab on grade is probably the kind of pour you are referring to. The problem is only partially one of lifting the slab, the other half is having the slab rest again on the grade. These kinds of concrete pours fill all the irregularities of the ground they are poured upon. If one could lift the slab without slab damage, the setting of the slab on a new ...


35

The hammering action of the drill isn't activating So the bit is overheating due to friction. It is supposed to hammer the material you're drilling into dust then evacuate it, not rub it off through friction. You have to activate the hammer action. Pretty much the only use cases for not using the hammer action are when drilling into ceramic tile to avoid ...


35

Yes, there is a very good reason. If you add water to dry mix in the bottom of the container, you get a nearly impossible to incorporate glob of the dry mix at the bottom. On the other hand, if you add it from the top, it's much easier to get it all incorporated. This works with everything from pancake mix to drywall compound. Try it each way and you'll see ...


34

More important than the power rating is the type of hammer drill. This is a very useful link which explains the full difference between a 'Hammer Drill' and a 'Rotary Hammer'. The former achieves the hammer action by spinning a bumpy disk against the end of the driveshaft of the chuck, which makes is vibrate a bit. These are OK for soft brick, but not much ...


32

By way of example, the pink Owens-Corning FOAMULAR 250 product and the blue DOW STYROFOAM Brand SM product rated for 25 and 30 psi compressive strength respectively. If weight is distributed and applied evenly a square foot of FOAMULAR 250 could support 25*12*12=3600 pounds at its limit while the STYROFOAM could support 4320 pounds. A footnote in the data ...


30

Hire a core driller. Trust me and do it. You will regret doing this yourself and the cost will seem like nothing in comparison to your struggles with drilling a hole that size in solid concrete. probably cost you 200 bucks. You can rent one from a tool rental company, or even from home depot.... https://www.homedepot.com/tool-truck-rental/Small-Core-...


27

Unless your home is a 20 bedroom mansion I would simply tell them to keep that off your driveway period. You can't tell what load it will take because it depends how packed it still is, what condition it is in and how thick it was poured (and if this was uniformly done). Often these large trucks will crack driveways in the corners of their pours since ...


24

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


22

My only guess is that a watery mix will have the layers settle in their different sedimentary layers with the fine cement settling to the bottom... One reason is that the aggregate can settle to the bottom much too easily, yes. This is called segregation and results in non-cohesiveness of concrete. Another reason too much water is bad is that it can ...


22

If you are using a core bit with a shaft for which there's an extension, you'd probably have thought of that already. As far as I know there's no extension available for SDS plus or SDS max shanks. There are extensions for the "rope" threads and for the 5/8" and 7/8" threads on diamond core bits. The John Henry method is to drill as far as you can, then ...


21

The simple way to "achieve that shape" is, of course, to buy it precast, which is almost certainly what the picture is - depending on size, it's either a section of well-casing, drainage pipe, or a manhole extension. @BrownRedHawk is correct that it may (indeed, probably will) destructively deteriorate if used as direct fire containment - the interior ...


21

I am not sure why they would tell you that it may ruin your drill. It might not be the most powerful hammer drill but it should be up for the job if you take the time to do it in stages. If you cannot rent and you do not want to buy a more robust hammer drill you’re only left with one option. I would start with a 3/16 inch masonry bit and see how that goes....


20

Like Greebo says, you want to get back down to the concrete, but I'd suggest that more to have a flat surface to build on top of. To make the job go faster, you can use a power tool. Several would get the job done: Power Chisel (best fit for the job): Air Hammer (you'd need a high capacity air compressor): Demo Hammer (more power than you need, but it ...


20

Concrete is a mix of large aggregate, small aggregate, and cement (a 4:2:1 ratio is a good approximation - though designed mixes will be more calculated than that). The size of the large aggregate isn't particularly important, unless you are working in very tight spaces or around reinforcement, in which case you want suitably small aggregate. In this case ...


20

If there is an upstream GFCI device protecting that outlet it is fine. See if any other outlet in the kitchen has a test and reset button, when you test it and it trips does the outlet by the sink also lose power? If so then the outlet is protected by the GFCI. The GFCI device can also be the breaker in the panel feeding the circuit. So check there as ...


19

While you probably could, this wouldn't be a good way to try and match a color. It would likely effect the setting performance of the concrete and you'd never match the color of the paint. On top of everything else, it would be much more expensive than the alternatives - all you really need is the pigment and everything else that makes up the paint is ...


18

The tile floor shouldn't be a structural weakness, but if it's glazed you won't get a good mortar bond. I'd install anchor bolts every 32" or so, aligned with block cores, and fill those cores with mortar. It might be easier to simply cut the tile inside the wall line and remove it, though. Also be aware that your slab may not be designed to carry a ...


18

A healthy 6" slab is probably robust enough to handle quite a bit of movement without cracking. You just need to lever it around, not lift it. (Maybe that's what you meant.) Clear all material away from the slab in the direction it's to be moved. Pothole at several locations on the "push" side of two corners about 12", tight to the slab. Insert a 6-foot ...


16

Well this is a pretty big deal because we don't know the cause. First let's go over common reasons we get cracks on new floors. Soil wasn't properly compacted. Soil should be compacted with a rock bed on top. Bad mixing at site. Especially in the summer contractors pump too much water in the mix. The water makes the concrete weaker and it does crack ...


16

The item you have pictured appears to be a precast fire ring. Several companies manufacture them specifically for fire pits. Depending on pricing and availability, it might be a lot easier, and possibly even cheaper to purchase one instead of trying to create your own. Since these are specially made for the purpose of being a fire pit, the manufacturers ...


16

You need to slow down and rethink this. You are on the verge of making a couple of serious mistakes. Rather than directly answer your question, I am going to advise a plan to do this correctly. First, you should not pour concrete around wood support posts. This is a good way to invite rot and an unstable support system. The floors should be jacked up a bit ...


16

One way to raise the floor, and possibly the most reasonable cost wise, is to install what I would call sleeper joists sitting the top of the existing subfloor and than add new subfloor covering over those. These "sleeper joists" would be installed as 2xX material on edge. This could be 2x6 planks spaced 16" apart. It may be necessary to rip the 2x6 planks ...


15

Having done this exact thing recently, I found that using the hard metal brush attachment for the angle grinder worked very well to remove thinset without affecting the concrete beneath it. I'd lean towards the stiffer bristles. Be sure to wet the thinset before starting, and as needed. The thinset comes off like mud, leaving clean concrete. Once finished, ...


15

My suggestion is to add to the size of the concrete drive way in the following manner: This gives you the option of backing up out of the car port in the new area toward the rear yard. Then you can drive in a forward direction which would be far easier to navigate by the truck and the corner of the house. Additionally the part added onto the side nearer ...


15

The usual methods are: Careful measurement. Really this doesn't need to be that precise, you are not looking for a press-fit between bolts and clearance holes. If it goes wrong, just elongate a hole into a slot using whatever tools you have to hand (e.g. a round file, clapped-out old Bridgeport, ...) - Remember: "A grinder file/filler and paint make me ...


15

Use a diamond core drill to get a nice clean hole. If you use a hammer drill and carbide drill bit the concrete on the opposite side is going to splay and look like like a beaver was chewing on the wall, not professional at all. You can rent the core drills at most commercial rental places and you will be through the wall in a matter of minutes with a nice ...


15

I put some posts into concrete - made a dry mix and tamped it down. Next day it was just about done - the mix absorbed moisture from the surrounding soil and was fine. If you need a really smooth top surface then adding a wetter screed is a possibility.


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