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10

The post looks reasonably adequate as it was originally built even by modern standards. If it wasn't you'd have seen disaster long ago, when it first started to decay. To maintain the style detail I'd rebuild to match, using pressure-treated lumber. By doing so you eliminate the need to cut that notch and you end up with a more robust post. A single post ...


6

We’ve learned a lot about construction in the last 115 years since your house was built. We use to just worry about holding everything “up”. Now we design for vertical loads and horizontal loads (seismic and wind loads). We also worry about the performance of the structural systems over time...including shrinkage of materials. Your beam (and gap between ...


4

Some are welded, by bending those "ears" or "tabs" over, others are bolted with clamps using those tabs. Check what was specified with the architect / design engineer. And, YES, it is required, otherwise it could be knocked over...


4

A lot of variables... one of the most important is what load they are supporting and how badly are they rusted aside from the split. Unless you are in a position to accurately gauge their "importance" to the structure you really should consult a qualified contractor. From the look of the photo there appears to be some buckling where the seam has split which ...


4

Use a 8" x 4" x 1/2" Steel Angled Deck Bracket: (the same thing that should be supporting 'B') Menards cityofchicago.org deck code, page listed as 25:


4

I wouldn't use the PVC pipe at all. Here are some things to think about... 1) Splitting the PVC pipe in half will involve two saw kerfs that will make the re-mated halves not restore to original size. 2) PVC cement will not work well in trying to re-join the two pipe halves. That type of cement is meant to be used in tight lap type joints; not in rough ...


3

Try Simpson's Outdoor Accents Product Line. Catalog here


3

Jacking buildings looks simple, but can be complex. I've done quite bit of it for a non-professional, but I happen to be related to a Licensed Professional Civil Engineer who directed the work I've done. As a brash youngster I often could not quite see why we had to take it so slowly - as a somewhat more experienced adult I grasp the fact that you can break ...


3

2x8s aren't adequate for floor joists by modern standards, let alone for beams (even doubled). Someone probably added the steel beam and post due to floor bounce or sag. My former home had something nearly identical underneath where a fireplace was added. I'd either leave it in place or bolster the doubled 2x8s that are along the duct with additional ...


3

If you're rebuilding, can you plan it so the posts go all the way from the footer to the existing roof? It's probably easier and maybe cheaper all around that way, and far stronger. The attachment to the roof above would probably be best handled by a piece of specialty hardware, the exact type would depend on the details of the roof corner, something ...


2

In areas with little or no seismic activity, or no high wind lift, it can be toenailed in at the top and bottom with 4 12D galvanized nails on each end. 8 toenails, 2 on each face is cool too, but I feel it is overkill. In other areas, you will need to use post clips of one sort or another similar to that you already have illustrated elsewhere in your ...


2

Option 1: Post Shore up the corner temporarily by any means Remove metal sheets and rods at corner Dig out corner enough to be able to dig out a footing at the celler floor level Pour footing in corner at cellar level Install post Reinstall metal sheets and rods and backfill Option 2: Wall Remove metal sheets and rods on side at house Shore up the side ...


2

A post base. There are several styles, this is one.


2

Ultraviolet light will degrade them (specifically the plastic that binds the fiberglass together into the "fiberglass reinforced plastic composite material" that we usually refer to as simply fiberglass) if you do not prime and paint, and then they will start shedding glass fiber (which does not degrade, but does make AWFUL splinters), which is a horrid mess ...


2

I would just angle the wall instead and leave plenty of room for a door. My OCD likes right angles too but there is nothing wrong with a wall that runs at an angle, especially in this case. Good luck!


2

You idea will work fine. No need for ramsets, there are self-drilling tapping screws that will hold those in place very well. Image courtesy of Uturn fasteners Big box stores or any good hardware store will have these.


1

Can you? Technically I'd say "yes" but with the disclaimer that you should not and this would likely not pass inspection (and I wouldn't do it because it's difficult to do safely, not something you'd want to DIY). It is difficult to cut 6x6 posts in a single pass, most builders will cut with a circular saw with max depth of 2", and cut from ...


1

Dry rot doesn't really exist but I'll imagine you said brown rot. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_rot It sounds like your post is not 6" above grade. I'd probably just put a 6x6 sonotube into the ground and have it extend up to where the wood is still good. Add a Simpson CB66PC and bolt the post back into it. https://www.strongtie.com/...


1

This is the reason for the blocking: "additional vertical members (2x4's) to carry the load from the beam up to another load bearing object above the floor (e.g. a new column)" In other words, it's a complete load path from the beam to the foundation if it's the later, what's benefit using the block to support the column? wouldn't be better for ...


1

As JACK and Ed Beal said they are probably carpenter bees which are benign enough. However, I take it you're more concerned with the structural issues they may cause. If you're like me, I look at that little hole and picture a multi-story compound in there. You can usually tell how big the cavity is by how much sawdust they push out but then you need to be ...


1

Whack the pole with a hammer a few times and see if you can stir the bees up enough to fly out. stick a piece of wire down there to get an idea of how big an opening there is and maybe spook them out. Last resort, spray some insecticide down there and then block up the hole with some caulk. I don't think a few would be a major problem to the columns but you ...


1

I had a similar situation, only it involved removing some load bearing walls. The wall framed what originally was the furnace (boiler) room in the house. Inside that room was a ~3'x6' entry into the attic. So the wall on two sides of the room provided the support for the ceiling joists, similar to the way your floor joists rested on the old wall for the ...


1

You almost certainly do NOT want to cut off the rebar in the columns as suggested by @EdBeal - that should be tied in and/or bent and tied in to the rebar in the beam. I'd think long and hard about just raising the upper floor by another 40 cm rather than chiseling all those columns - but if they are freshly poured, you may find that they will chisel easily,...


1

It is mostly a style and preference choice. The original half inch lumber post is probably not structural, though it could well have been a cheap replacement for one which was more substantial. From what I can see of the eves, a 4x4 or 6x6 post is appropriate. Some jurisdictions require heavier columns beyond a certain length, usually about 10 feet. ...


1

The install of the post could be as straightforward as it gets, set the post in plumb, tighten it up, drill holes in the concrete to accept wedge anchors or another type of fastener and secure the top and walk away from it, wrap it in drywall too if needed. That does not guarantee anything. I can safely assume there is a pier footing below the slab floor. ...


1

It's not bad at all actually, the drywall chunk above the column's cover isn't even crushed. For as new as your lumber is this is just for stability to guard against sag & not a truly critical component. The floor isn't cracked so it's still hitting the footer, I'd just check for plumb to see if a new concrete filled column could or should land back in ...


1

Stock approach is to paint the post as required, then hide it inside additional decorative (or better yet decorative and additional fire-proofing) material. A lower end example of this is a plasterboard box around the column.


1

This is a very unusual request. you must have some unique building codes or you are a first floor owner with more floors above you. Normal supporting walls or columns don't have fire ratings in single family residential settings. With that said, you may want to look at a steel post support covered with a split round column, or a fab on site square column. ...


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