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3

The best way to overcome this is to re-wash the windows with an entirely different technique. Get yourself some microfiber cleaning cloths and a silicone edge squeegee. Get a plastic bucket with some warm to hot water. Add some general purpose cleaning soap. I like to use Fabuloso from Costco as it is cost effective and works well. Wash down a window ...


1

White distilled vinegar works great. Just put it in a spray bottle and spray on to the moldy surface. Wait an hour and then wipe down surface with water. I used to use bleach but it only really works on non porous surfaces. Does your bathroom vent well? Try to determine the cause of the mold and fix it. Also, don't let it build up until the next ...


1

I have rinsed with clear water and a large rubber squeegee 3 times. On the inside basements I cleaned I made a u shaped dam slightly wider than my squeegee, I set my shop vac to suck the water as I pushed it in, it really worked better than I thought it would, I used some scrap angle iron but I bet some 2x4 scraps would work. On the basement I may have ...


0

concrete's is naturally alkaline washing with water should suffice, but if you want to hit it with quicklime or baking soda that's not going to do any harm.


1

It will stain walls just like tobacco - smoke is smoke in that regard. I've never experienced an odor renovating spaces, including homes of people I know smoke it habitually. I know the smell can be very powerful when it's been used recently, especially if you aren't a habitual user yourself, but it always seems to fade pretty quickly. If this is a ...


2

I’ve been smoking pot inside every house I’ve rented for the past 17 years. I need it for my epilepsy and am a biochemist who studies the plant. I have never had a landlord say anything about it as it doesn’t stick to walls like nicotine does. Nicotine has a different chemical structure and sticks to everything. Also, MOST POT SMOKERS DO NOT MIX IN TOBACCO ...


1

Had hazy marks from lead flashing on conservatory roof. I thought I'd try 'Silvo' which is non-abrasive and used for cleaning fine silver. Success!! The marks came off a treat with really minimal rubbing with a soft cloth moistened with the product. Crystal clear glass after


1

There are also single-use products like the DustBubble. I used something like this a few years ago when drilling holes into walls in my home, and it worked pretty well. Pros: Easy for one person to use You can (pretty much) still see where you're drilling No need to get your vacuum cleaner out Cons: Single use, so not environmentally ideal Single use, so ...


1

I use a small box that's taped to the wall just below the hole. (it's a mini milk box, about 1" by 8" by 6". The 1" gap for the dust to fall into catches pretty much all of it and the fact it's a box means you can drill more than one hole before it needs emptying. (just make sure the tape retains it's sticky each time you move it or it'll fall down, ...


1

Acetone is supposedly safe on nylon and polyester (my purdy xl brush states that it's a blend), and may possibly be effective (it tends to at least soften oil based poly, but I've never used it on water based poly). I've never had to clean anything off it, so I'm honestly not sure. If acetone fails, at least $15 is a relatively cheap mistake to make. Most ...


2

Soak it good and plenty in soapy water. Water based paints are pretty soft stuff, and 1/2 hour to dry isn't really enough to start them curing. Water should soften them up. Don't use hot water as that will accelerate cure. You can try some fairly wimpy paint stripper if you have some hardware store brand around. You don't want the industrial tier ...


0

My experience is that once you have left the brush to dry, either partially or fully, the poly will have chemically cured to the point that it will not be cleanable by any tame cleaning method. The only hope at all is that possibly some of the strongest paint and finish strippers could soften and remove the poly in the brush. Success is unlikely though ...


3

I use a variety of methods (included in other answers) depending on the situation, but in most for about the past year I have been happy with the Milwaukee M12 HAMMERVAC. No additional cords or hoses, the depth stop is useful, good battery life and fits my tools from multiple brands (it comes with three different sized collars, but your mileage may vary). ...


1

Contractor's solvent (a product similar to Goo Gone, but a different formula) does dried silicone on glass, but I wouldn't risk it on the backsplash. I would use a razor blade scraper (carefully) there. The best time to clean up silicone smears is during application, before it is set. A lightly damp sponge works okay, though if you're doing a lot of caulking ...


9

A combination of my "vacuum near drill point" answer and @mrks' mini-vacuum Karcher device answer: You can get a (hopefully) universal vacuum cleaner collector attachment for collecting drilling dust: and then you can use your large independent vacuum cleaner; the head should attach to the surface you're drilling into by the force of the vacuum: However,...


10

Squirt bottle Wet the wall area just as you start, then as soon as the bit is seated, use one hand to squirt a small amount of water at the hole in frequent intervals. This will assure the stuff comes out as mud. The point of the squirt bottle is to allow you to tightly regulate the amount of water, so you aren't adding any more water than needed to do ...


4

I saw a similar question asked somewhere (possibly here, though I'm not about to be that "marked as duplicate" guy), and I suggested the post-it method already mentioned. Someone else then commented that he worked in a clean-room environment where atmospheric dust was a problem, and they used shaving foam(!): Position the drill, spray some shaving foam on/...


13

I am using this tool (Kärcher DDC 50). You put the drill through the hole on the right, and the battery-driven vacuum not only sucks the dust into the storage container but also sucks the entire tool onto the wall, making this a hands-free operation. Careful with wallpapers - sometimes the suction is too strong and you might see some creases afterwards. ...


18

In addition to the halved tennis ball trick, when drilling walls, I usually use Post-It notes. Take one sheet, fold it horizontally away from the sticky side, then stick it to the wall just below the hole you're drilling. The fold will open up just a bit under its own weight. As you drill, the dust will accumulate in this fold - once the hole is done, ...


1

Just buy an appropriately-formed plastic device to put around the head of your drill. A search on AliExpress yields a few promising candidates: and


9

Cut a tennis ball in half. Drill a hole in the center of one half, slide the half over the drill bit, line up the drill and bit to where the hole is to be. Slide the half ball up against the wall and start drilling. The half ball will catch the dust and keep it from getting into the air...


30

Get it wet! When drilling or cutting stone, using water to cool the bit will help cut faster and smoother and prolong the life of the bit. When drilling in the wet hole, you don't need a special drill because all of the electrics are safely away from the water. When using a saw or grinder, one made for wet cutting is recommended. Of course, using water ...


33

Vacuum near the point of drilling Have someone to stand next to you with the nozzle of a (running) vacuum cleaner, and position it very carefully near the where the drill bit enters the wall. Preferably - under the drill point facing up, so as not to "compete" with gravity. Most of the dust should be caught by the vacuum cleaner. Down-sides to this ...


4

On the mirror specifically, you may be able to use acetone solvent, however this may harm the splashback. If you have extra you can test, but it will not harm glass My go-to solvent for cleaning ANYTHING off of glass is non-chlorinated automotive brake cleaner, which is usually a mix of acetone, methanol, toluene, heptane, and hexane. HOWEVER, this is quite ...


15

Wait until it dries and use a razor blade to scrape it off.


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