32

The filling is melted aluminum that galled/melted and filled the gullet and is covering one of the Tungsten Carbide teeth. You can pull it off with a pliers. The negative rake angle of the blade is fine for cutting aluminum, it will push your workpiece away instead of tending to grab onto it. It will generate more heat and be more likely to melt the ...


18

Yes the J shape is supposed to be there for expansion. If you look at a Diablo blade it has the J relief cuts at the edges and also d-shaped relief cuts within the body of the blade. The large tooth looks like it may be build up of aluminum on the carbide tooth. It definitely doesn't look like carbide. If it is Aluminum it should be easy to pull off with a ...


8

Back in the day when I used to put up vinyl siding, I found that the best way to cut it with a circular saw was with a cheap 140 tooth plywood blade installed backwards (to give the teeth a negative rake and prevent chipping): For really hard plastics, I've used a diamond abrasive blade before and that did a great job (these are incredibly expensive if we'...


7

Despite what you might believe, those adjustment levers on most tools are not calibrated very well. Even on my table saw I regularly use a simple plastic 90-degree triangle to ensure my blade is aligned to the table. This is part of owning any tool and it's worth a few moments to verify everything is set up properly. A more expensive tool will simply buy ...


7

Most circular saws have either a push lever that stops the arbor from spinning or a hole in the rear guard through which you insert a thin round metal object (screwdriver) which will catch on a saw blade tooth to keep it from spinning while you tighten the arbor nut. Note that many saws have a left-hand thread arbor nut.


7

I highly recommend using a pusher and gloves for this project. There are lots of "brands" you can choose from, or you can use another board to do it. You only have one set of fingers though, and keeping them safe is more important than any project. If you will note in the above picture, the board is being pushed forward and into the fence. This is an ...


6

You are quite lucky that you were not injured. Perhaps you should take a step back and plan it out a little better. Proper shop safety should always be followed, even on small jobs. For starters, the piece of stock you were trying to machine is far too short to be cut with a router safely. The minimum length that can be cut with a router is around 12". For ...


6

Buy a handsaw like this 13-20 dollars. Will cut straight not fast and it will strengthen and tone your arm muscles.


6

I'd suggest ear protection, eye protection, and if you're doing a lot of cutting or particularly sensitive to sawdust, dust protection (p95 or better). Steel toe/steel shank boots are generally good on a worksite, but they aren't specific to circular saws. If you are worried about cutting into your legs or worse, you need to think again about how to use a ...


6

Three things can cause wandering (or what seems like wandering). The first is a misaligned table and/or fence. The cut isn't actually wandering, but it seems like it is visually because of how the table is tracking across the workpiece. The second is the use of modern "thin kerf" blades for rip cuts. While they're fantastically fast for crosscuts, they tend ...


6

Especially within the same size class of saws (eg. 8.5", 10", 12") you will find that machines sometimes have blades which differ in size up to 5 mm / 1/5" (12": 300–305 mm, 10": 250–254 mm). For the less common sizes the size difference might be even more obscure: consider Mafell’s MT55 requirement for 162 mm blades, which is slightly smaller than 6-1/2" (...


6

My normal way to deal with this is to put 3 scraps of 2x4 on the floor. One is on the longer board near the cut point. One is at the end of the longer board, or at least halfway. The third is not quit halfway down the short end. This gives you 1.5" clearance. When you make the cut, the short piece is trying to pivot upward at the saw, but the sole plate ...


5

It is very likely, that the fixating screw/disk is loose. Do not operate the saw in this state. It is dangerous. A circular saw usually has a direct drive. I.e. the motor spindle is also the center shaft for the blade. So if your motor is spinning, but not the blade, it means the blade has lost contact to the shaft. Check if the blade is properly centered ...


5

Holding the saw with one hand is an advanced, and unsafe technique. You'll often find that folks in the construction industry (especially those on YouTube), do not follow proper safety precautions. Holding the saw with two hands will reduce the chances of the saw kicking uncontrollably, if the saw happens to bind or hit a foreign object. It also insures ...


5

If you're sure it's the shaft that's loose, and not a misalignment in the blade attachment, then it's most likely one of the bearings supporting the shaft that's bad. Check for play in the bearing flange (Component 36). If that's solid, then check the bearing sleeve (component 13). Unfortunately if it's the armature that's damaged (component 3), then you're ...


4

Honestly, a 12 year old black and decker probably needs to go to the scrap yard. Low end saws are not built to be rebuildable, at least since the late 20th century (some 50 year old "low end" saws were a lot less "low end" in construction) - a 21st century low-end saw was usually built with "planned obsolescence" from the design phase forward. Provide the ...


4

Either you're not using the arbor lock feature (look for a button or lever nearby which engages a hole or slot in the arbor as you turn), or your bolt is stripped. Use the arbor lock or replace the bolt.


4

A majority of people are right handed. With the blade to the left you are positioned to comfortably view the cut (for a right handed person).


4

Different power gearing speeds collets tool diameters direction of forces means of use climb vs conventional accessories ability to sand or wirebrush I think even if you managed to fit a sawblade on a grinder, you would have a completely uncontrollable tool that would be impossible to successfully engage to any work except for cars full of lost college ...


4

The link you have says the shelves have a paper honey comb center, not solid. You will not like it if you cut it.


4

I agree that the blade seems fine. Next time you are cutting, try using wax to lubricate the blade. You can use regular candle wax, but there is special wax formulated for this purpose and formed to make it easy to apply. I often stop mid cut and add more wax to the blade and kerf.


4

Have extra supports either side of the saw, with the one not clamped to the machine slightly lower to allow it to drop a small amount - again to stop it binding.


4

There are two approaches I'd recommend. Use three or four support points. If you have four saw horses, and cut in the center space, both cut boards are supported. There's no issue. Even three support points is adequate since you can have one hand on one end of one cut board. Catch the cut board with your "off" hand. I'm right-handed, so I'd have the full ...


3

Repairing small hand tools is rarely economically feasible (even thought the thought of built in obsolescence/landfill overload is distressing). It sounds like a bad bearing, but the cost of the labor involved in changing would probably exceed the cost of a new saw. I would get a new one. Cordless tools are great, even in a shop. But circular saws need a ...


3

This could be a bearing problem where the main bearings have dried out and are starting to seize up. If the saw has seen lots and lots of use over its life time it is possible that the motor brushes are failing and need replacement. (Note that this would primarily apply to an AC powered tool). If the saw is a battery powered unit the problem may be that ...


3

I have a 7 1/4 inch circular blade which is specifically for laminates and plastics. When cutting flooring, I wasn't so impressed with its performance at first but when I tried standard crosscut and ripping blades I was then very impressed. The standard wood working blades got gummed up and melted or fractured the laminate while lugging and jamming the saw ...


3

Make a shim out of thin cardboard and place it between the inner blade washer and the blade. The blades they're making these days are thinner than the older blades and some of the older saws have to be shimmed in order to prevent blade slippage.


3

I have used a screwdriver. UNPLUG THE SAW. finger tighten the bolt as far as you can, set the screwdriver across the fence and slide it into the teeth so that blade tooth is up against the shaft of the screwdriver and can not turn. This is usually enough to get the arbor bolt to snug up enough so that it pinches the arbor onto the blade. Perhaps a vise ...


3

While a push stick is a great first step, one or more featherboards with a push stick really is the best solution here. When they are well secured, they will prevent nearly all kickback, either on a router table or table saw. When kickback occurs with just a push stick you are still relying on your body to resist the kickback, with featherboards kickback is ...


3

No, you're not crazy. The key is to consider how many of the blade's teeth are in contact with the workpiece at a given moment. The more teeth, the more resistance because you're essentially forcing each tooth into the material with your own muscle. Pulling will usually result in less resistance for the blade because it's cutting an effectively thinner depth ...


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