9

Given your fairly precisely stated 15/16" OD of the pipe, the only pipe anywhere near that size is EMT "Electrical Metal Tubing". But you say it's plastic. I can't find any plastic pipe near that dimension. Everything is <7/8" or well over 1", nearly 1-1/16". I'll proceed assuming EMT, since my wire reco has a lot of slack. It also sounds like you ...


6

First problem: those 10/2 cables ate your conduit fill Your first problem was that for some reason, you used cables in this conduit run originally, instead of individual wires; since a cable must be treated having a round cross-section for fill purposes due to cable twist, stuffing cables down your conduit is what left you with no room for anything else. ...


3

No, it never works that way. Two 20A circuits don't make a 40A circuit. A 30A breaker does not mean two 15A circuits. When two 15A or 20A circuits are combined on a single cable sharing a neutral (called a MWBC), they use a double-wide, common-throw breaker like that, but it's a 15A or 20A breaker. It must stay on this style of breaker with a common ...


3

I have seen these at Home Depot and a few other home stores. They are not cheap, about $10. I would be more concerned about why your fuses are blowing. Are the circuits overloaded? You need to determine that first. Don't even think about increasing the fuse/breaker size until you or someone else checks the wire size for the circuits. Just get a few boxes of ...


3

If your vacuum is blowing each breaker in your house, it is drawing way too much power, and you need to fix it before you have an electrical fire to deal with. For a 20 year old appliance, I would look at the power cord, the brushes and the bearings, as failures in each of those could cause the problem you are experiencing. Your problem could be ...


2

I believe your problem is the extension cord. Is there any way you can locate the saw(s) so that they can be directly plugged into the outlet? What happens when you use an extension cord with an induction motor (which is almost certainly what you are dealing with) is that there is an initial surge of current until the motor builds up a resistance (called ...


2

What if it's actually a 30A appliance? Here's the thing. Usually when people just slapdash off "30A appliance" for appliances that are *actually 21-24 amps... A/C, water heater, or dryer. But suppose the appliance is actually honest 30 amps. Most appliances must be derated by 125% when provisioning service (this is the same as the 80% thing, just tucked ...


2

The "6 KA" number (literally, 6000 amps) is based on being able to trip out at the maximum possible bolted fault (i.e. not having its contacts welded shut by the current). There's really no point having a 25KA breaker when the delivery wires are incapable of delivering even 6KA of flow. The current capacity of the delivery wires is decided by their size ...


2

This is probably what you are looking for. Hopefully image comes thru. I've never used them, so maybe others have an opinion about them.


2

Depends on the label on the Heat pump, the wire size and type, and the stab rating on the panel cover. Breakers do wear out, it would still be a benefit to replace with the original size it if was the correct size to start with. It is rare that anybody installs a smaller than maximum allowed breaker at the time of installation, but the information you need ...


2

This almost always results from mixed of interconnected neutrals. If you have a connection between neutrals of different circuits, or the neutrals are switched, then the current through the GFCI circuitry is unbalanced, causing the trip. The other thing to check is that you moved the neutral wires from the neutral bus to the neutral terminals of the ...


2

If the circuit is under normal load - not over the limit, e.g. at 60% of the rate when the ground fault occurs, the sound of the breaker will not be very different from an overload - in case of no shortcut. Especially if inductive devices like big motors or transformers are interrupted. There is a small chance to distinguish a GF (if the normal load is zero ...


2

If the GFCI breaker pops because of a ground fault it pops softly without a loud sound. When it pops due to an overload you can hear a sharp sound inside the breaker comming from the spark during the opening of the breaker contact


2

Don't try to run a saw and a dust collector on the same circuit You seem to think a 20A circuit will magically support both. No, it won't. You sink the time, energy and cost into getting that single 20A circuit, plug both in, and you'll get a snap for your trouble. Stop trying. You need a 15A circuit for the dust collector, and Bob's your uncle. For ...


2

This is an open-and-shut case of a vacuum cleaner that needs to go to the repair shop. It could be a variety of problems, including junk sucked into the motor. A quality vacuum should be repairable.


2

It's possible you have a ground wire nicking a hot or neutral. The easiest way to remove that issue is wrap the outlets and switches with a couple loops of electrical tape so the screws are covered. I do that in metal boxes/EMT, and that doesn't even have ground wires. Also, if the screws are all the way out because they came that way from the factory and ...


1

Your theory seems to make sense based on the diagnostic. The obvious problem is finding the fault. Appears that the only reason the garage breaker tripped is you had it tied into the lower level circuit via the common which is where the ground fault or arcing is apparently located. Since the lower level is all one circuit your approach of halving the ...


1

Assuming the picture with the circuit breakers labeled is accurate, and going down to the picture of the inside of the panel where breaker 15 is located, it looks to me like that's 14 wire to the breaker. If that's the cable to the garage, then the answer is NO. The breaker on any 14 gauge wired circuit can not be greater than 15 amps.


1

What you're looking at is a 40A circuit at 240V. It's possible to split a 240V circuit into dual 120V circuits, but then, it's the amperage on the breaker -- i.e. this splits into two 40A circuits, not into two 20A. So a 40A breaker is absolutely useless for creating 20A circuits. If you want 20A circuits, the breaker must be 20A. This 40A breaker ...


1

You may still get the "Murray" made by Siemens breaker you need, but I was unable to get the downloadable tool from the website below to work. If you have a non-CTL panel it looks like Q23020CT2NC could possibly what you're looking for, the NC in the model number is non-ctl. From the Siemens website: Murray Phase-Out in 2020 The Murray brand will be ...


1

There's no such thing as a universal breaker Several of the 1" breaker lines will seem to interchange. But they don't. The critical point, where they clip onto the bus stab, is different. That means instead of a curved surface contact, they are making a point contact, with all the current going through a tiny spot of metal. This causes overheating, ...


1

The 20/30/30/20 (called a "quad" breaker) is created by coupling two tandem or "twin" breakers; a 20/30 and a 30/20. In older panels twins will only fit in certain slots, because there were limits to the total number of circuits you could have in those panels. So only a few of the slots allowed the use of twins. On the directory sheet, usually glued to the ...


1

GFCI breakers are prone to fail earlier than traditional breakers. I would swap the breaker with another functioning GFCI breaker from the electrical panel to see if the problem follows the breaker or continues on the existing circuit.


1

I can say that for a Square D QO or Homeline GFI breaker, there's no visible difference. The trip indicator shows orange, and the handle moves to the middle regardless of the trip reason. This is the behavior of the GFI breakers that I have used, but it might be worth looking up an instruction manual for your exact brand to see if there is a hint to the ...


1

The existing tandems are of the correct model for this panel... Your existing panel appears to be a very old GE panel, of a style that predates the current THQP half-width GE breaker, as well as the formal introduction of Circuit Total Limiting panels. These ancient panels use type TR tandem breakers instead, and the spare breaker you photographed indeed ...


1

You have to look at the Breaker Trip Curve and read the docs. Breakers have two trip modes Magnetic trip is an instantaneous trip. That is the non-curvy part of the trip curve. Current makes a couple of turns around a solenoid; when the current exceeds some wildly large number compared to the breaker's rating, SNAP! Thermal trip is a delayed trip. ...


1

Try Using A radio, Plug it in, Turn it on, and set the volume to full. Then go to your circuit breakers and start switching them on and off until you hear the radio turn off.


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