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16

Sounds like you need a chimney cap These come in a variety of sizes and shapes. They keep out most rain and snow and, most importantly, animals. You should attach any cap with stainless screws and lead anchors. Sealant is not a big issue, since there is no need for air or water tight joints. While sealant might hold in most conditions, strong winds could ...


8

Pretty much any fix that you attempt from the inside has the potential to create issues in addition to the primary problem, which is that your chimney isn't properly flashed. Spraying foam or shooting caulking/tar into the gap is very likely to create water traps somewhere in the roof decking, most likely underneath the existing flashing. You would ...


6

We removed an old brick chimney to install a modern (well, 1970's modern - stainless steel is more common these days in your better chimneys) block and tile chimney by simply hammering and removing bricks. If you do it top down it's "apparently more tedious" but actually less time overall than anything involving "knocking it down" and then clearing up the ...


5

I would really suggest that you should hire a local expert to come out to your place to give you advice on the chimney condition, design and safety. I am quite sure that there was good reason to cap off and close up the chimney and fireplace in the past and it is highly unlikely that you will come to an understanding of the reasons without some seasoned ...


5

Your dad is wrong. Chimneys have been used for non-fireplace heating systems since the days of the Franklin Stove. Also, remember that the interior of the house may have been drastically rearranged over the years. My kitchen definitely isn't where it was when the place was built, and in fact the old kitchen space is now my dining room. The only way to be ...


5

I added a chimney cap, and the leaking was significantly reduced during rains. (Image from http://Lowes.com) I later noticed that during rain, water was pooling on the ground near the chimney. So I built up soil against the base of the house. This made the rain water run down and away. After both fixes, there is no longer any water leaking in, even ...


4

We were able to find someone to do this. They removed part of the roof on the garage and built a ramp over the ply wood to toss down bricks. They removed it to below the roof of the chimney and patched the hole in the roof and reinstalled the metal panels. They also put siding on the house where the chimney was. No mess in the living room and it was ...


4

It sounds like your chimney cap top might have flew off for that much water to come in. Mine just a few months ago and I had to secure it with extra screws. I would check that first. If it is only coming inside the chimney it really has to be top of the cap or that you need caulking around the base of your cap.


4

Allow for the possibility that you or the next owner might want to use them again, and try closing them off "less destructively" - metal flashing as @bib suggests, or my personal favorite for this job, a glazed ceramic tile mortared onto the top of the flue. Stays put, sheds water, can be knocked free in the future if there's ever a need for it.


4

That would depend on the pipe, and its required clearance to combustibles. If it's 0" - no problem. If it's 2" - get carving.


4

I do not know if it is necessary to actually fill it, but as a minimum I would use metal to create a collar to keep it stationary and to keep the weather, bats and other critters from causing future headaches.


3

I would consider stainless preferable in every way. However, there evidently are UL listed aluminum liners for venting gas appliances. I'd still put stainless in my house (if I had a gas line on my street.) Stainless has better corrosion resistance, higher temperature tolerance, higher strength, and some decades of experience (in general, not specifically ...


3

Just wanted to make sure this was recorded: Be careful to look at what else the chimney may be supporting, In my 1880's house, the base of the chimney used to help support the ground floor's main beam; that eventually faled which is why the beam now has columns under it (and why the dining room, and the bedroom above it, have tilted floors). It is possible ...


3

It means what it says. If you go 10 feet from the chimney in any direction horizontally, you need to be at least 2 feet above the roof. Which means that your chimney is poorly located, if it's within 10 feet of a higher roof. So it needs to be 12 feet tall, if that's what it takes. Wind currents over that higher roof can cause downdrafts in the chimney - and ...


3

Have you the faintest clue what 10 feet of chimney weighs? "reinforce here" to WHAT exactly, that's going to hold up 10 feet of bricks? This is a bad, terrible unthinkable idea. Take it down from the top, or hire somone else to take it down from the top, or far enough from the top that you feel comfortable working on it. Don't kill yourself, or someone ...


3

Correlation is not causation. No, the insulation did not make your roof leak around the chimney nor at the vent. Being 100 years old (and odds are great someone did something sketchy during one of those years, though even the best construction/repair jobs don't last forever) did that. Rather than chase chimeras, fix the leaks.


3

98% of small leaks are water getting into the flashing area between the chimney and the flashing or the flashing and the shingles. The flashing sealant you have should work fine - although you need to make sure for a caulking type sealant that this is applied liberally and squeezed into the gaps. I often use FlexSeal for smaller leaks because of its ...


3

...This is one school of thought: seal the chimney to prevent air flow. By preventing air flow, you also prevent the flow of moisture the air carries with it, and the formation of condensation on the colder, interior face of the flue. FYI, the insulation you push up into the flue works simply because it blocks the flow of air; insulation 'warms' nothing. ...


3

Yes, spray foam is combustible. What you have there is almost certainly a building code violation as well as violation of the spray foam manufacturer's installation instructions and as such you have a legal right to make the company you hired come back to fix it. It's also a fire hazard. Sprayed polyurethane foam will start to burn at about 650 degrees ...


3

Of course if you can get a camera up (or down) the flue then you might be able to see excessive build up of carbon (etc.) deposits. However, it will be as black as can be up there and the small light on most USB type endoscopes might not be bright enough to really make an accurate assessment. Generally, if you're thinking the chimney might need cleaning, ...


3

No. That would be like sealing the bottom side of a sponge--moisture will travel through it to emerge in other areas. You can probably accomplish the repair even in winter. A water hose will quickly melt snow and ice from the areas you need to access, or use scaffolding and other hardware to work over it.


3

You need to slide that handle over to the larger slot and then pull it down or push it up. Ok, good you got it. It was hard to tell from the picture which way it operated. You could try some WD-40 but these dampers are pretty cheaply made and don't have a precision fit. You should try working it back and forth to loosen it up a bit.


2

B-vent is what should be used for exhausting gas appliances and most likely why you have a gap in a 6" escussion with a 6" pipe in it. Notice the ID and OD for B-vent. If its just an air handler for a bath fan use a flapper vent. AMPG's PDF Now you can fill the new 1/8~1/4" gap with an approved high temp caulk.


2

I realize this post is "old" however I wanted to post the answers as the information is always relevant to future question askers! :) I sold venting pipe professionally for 4 years, and have experience designing a variety of systems. Just a few notes: 1. Always check your clearances to combustible materials. Zero-clearance fireplaces are only zero ...


2

There is no minimum or maximum distance from a foundation, footing, panel or otherwise. It is best to keep it as close as possible, but nothing dictates this by code. The main thing you want to avoid is getting it a few feed down then hitting the footing. This is a PIA. Here are the relevant code sections with regard to spacing. Taken form the 2001 NEC. ...


2

You might not get the original look back, but you can make it better. I'd take grinding wheel and cut a deep groove in the outer ring of mortar, then go to town on the bricks in the middle (as the groove will protect the older brick from damage). This will make quite a bit of dust, a dust shroud and HEPA vacuum rental are highly recommended, along with ...


2

Flue cap is not waterproof, especially in wind. I am talking from experience. We have two chimneys, one with regular flue cap: and the other with a directionalflue cap similar to this: From my experience, the directional version works much better, but requires some maintenance, like occasional lubricating (like once a year is more than enough).


2

You need to find if the chimney is leaning or if the house is leaning. Use a plumb bob to check - the eye can be deceiving in these situations. The plumb bob will tell you what you should do. In the meantime, if you wish, you could put a board or metal flashing on the gap to shed the water while you figure out what to do. BTW... it's unlikely you could "...


2

Just in case someone else looks at this I will add an answer since Andy's answer seems a little off. First to tear down a chimney is about $1000 in the US. There is siding, roof, and other repairs that have to be made. Not sure what Andy had going on since we never got a picture. $2500 might not be way off if they had to do a lot of things after the ...


2

When in use, the chimney itself will be at a higher temperature than ambient. Just how high will depend on several factors: materials used, thickness, fire heat output, etc. You can get an idea of just how hot just by touching the visible part of the chimney with your hand, and a more precise reading from an IR gun. This is actually a desirable feature, ...


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