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16

Sounds like you need a chimney cap These come in a variety of sizes and shapes. They keep out most rain and snow and, most importantly, animals. You should attach any cap with stainless screws and lead anchors. Sealant is not a big issue, since there is no need for air or water tight joints. While sealant might hold in most conditions, strong winds could ...


8

Pretty much any fix that you attempt from the inside has the potential to create issues in addition to the primary problem, which is that your chimney isn't properly flashed. Spraying foam or shooting caulking/tar into the gap is very likely to create water traps somewhere in the roof decking, most likely underneath the existing flashing. You would ...


7

Creosote from wood fires is the main reason, so no, cleaning from that standpoint isn't needed.


6

We removed an old brick chimney to install a modern (well, 1970's modern - stainless steel is more common these days in your better chimneys) block and tile chimney by simply hammering and removing bricks. If you do it top down it's "apparently more tedious" but actually less time overall than anything involving "knocking it down" and then clearing up the ...


5

Attaching to the chimney is not a good idea. Just forget about that idea. If you want to protect against a fall while you are at the top of the chimney, you need to anchor your line at or above your working height. If you don't have anything else near by then you're out of luck. I recommend looking to to renting a towable manlift.


5

There is no reliable data I know of for the ultimate strength of expansion anchors in brick masonry. It's not a viable anchor system no matter how many you use (within reason). You are almost better off with no protection because then you will make damn sure you do not fall. (Just kidding, but there is some logic to this amongst rock climbers). An anchor ...


5

I would really suggest that you should hire a local expert to come out to your place to give you advice on the chimney condition, design and safety. I am quite sure that there was good reason to cap off and close up the chimney and fireplace in the past and it is highly unlikely that you will come to an understanding of the reasons without some seasoned ...


5

Your dad is wrong. Chimneys have been used for non-fireplace heating systems since the days of the Franklin Stove. Also, remember that the interior of the house may have been drastically rearranged over the years. My kitchen definitely isn't where it was when the place was built, and in fact the old kitchen space is now my dining room. The only way to be ...


5

I added a chimney cap, and the leaking was significantly reduced during rains. (Image from http://Lowes.com) I later noticed that during rain, water was pooling on the ground near the chimney. So I built up soil against the base of the house. This made the rain water run down and away. After both fixes, there is no longer any water leaking in, even ...


4

A suitable ladder stabiliser would provide a little extra extra security.


4

It sounds like your chimney cap top might have flew off for that much water to come in. Mine just a few months ago and I had to secure it with extra screws. I would check that first. If it is only coming inside the chimney it really has to be top of the cap or that you need caulking around the base of your cap.


4

Allow for the possibility that you or the next owner might want to use them again, and try closing them off "less destructively" - metal flashing as @bib suggests, or my personal favorite for this job, a glazed ceramic tile mortared onto the top of the flue. Stays put, sheds water, can be knocked free in the future if there's ever a need for it.


4

That would depend on the pipe, and its required clearance to combustibles. If it's 0" - no problem. If it's 2" - get carving.


4

I do not know if it is necessary to actually fill it, but as a minimum I would use metal to create a collar to keep it stationary and to keep the weather, bats and other critters from causing future headaches.


3

It means what it says. If you go 10 feet from the chimney in any direction horizontally, you need to be at least 2 feet above the roof. Which means that your chimney is poorly located, if it's within 10 feet of a higher roof. So it needs to be 12 feet tall, if that's what it takes. Wind currents over that higher roof can cause downdrafts in the chimney - and ...


3

We were able to find someone to do this. They removed part of the roof on the garage and built a ramp over the ply wood to toss down bricks. They removed it to below the roof of the chimney and patched the hole in the roof and reinstalled the metal panels. They also put siding on the house where the chimney was. No mess in the living room and it was ...


3

A mid size rotary hammer (SDS plus or SDS max) with a point and a chisel will break the bricks out. Have an extra manual chisel, mason's hammer and prybar on hand (to free the rotary hammer, when you get carried away and plunge too deep). Hand, eye and head (hard hat) protection are advised. Dust masks, too.


3

Just wanted to make sure this was recorded: Be careful to look at what else the chimney may be supporting, In my 1880's house, the base of the chimney used to help support the ground floor's main beam; that eventually faled which is why the beam now has columns under it (and why the dining room, and the bedroom above it, have tilted floors). It is possible ...


3

I would consider stainless preferable in every way. However, there evidently are UL listed aluminum liners for venting gas appliances. I'd still put stainless in my house (if I had a gas line on my street.) Stainless has better corrosion resistance, higher temperature tolerance, higher strength, and some decades of experience (in general, not specifically ...


3

Have you the faintest clue what 10 feet of chimney weighs? "reinforce here" to WHAT exactly, that's going to hold up 10 feet of bricks? This is a bad, terrible unthinkable idea. Take it down from the top, or hire somone else to take it down from the top, or far enough from the top that you feel comfortable working on it. Don't kill yourself, or someone ...


3

Correlation is not causation. No, the insulation did not make your roof leak around the chimney nor at the vent. Being 100 years old (and odds are great someone did something sketchy during one of those years, though even the best construction/repair jobs don't last forever) did that. Rather than chase chimeras, fix the leaks.


3

98% of small leaks are water getting into the flashing area between the chimney and the flashing or the flashing and the shingles. The flashing sealant you have should work fine - although you need to make sure for a caulking type sealant that this is applied liberally and squeezed into the gaps. I often use FlexSeal for smaller leaks because of its ...


3

...This is one school of thought: seal the chimney to prevent air flow. By preventing air flow, you also prevent the flow of moisture the air carries with it, and the formation of condensation on the colder, interior face of the flue. FYI, the insulation you push up into the flue works simply because it blocks the flow of air; insulation 'warms' nothing. ...


3

Yes, spray foam is combustible. What you have there is almost certainly a building code violation as well as violation of the spray foam manufacturer's installation instructions and as such you have a legal right to make the company you hired come back to fix it. It's also a fire hazard. Sprayed polyurethane foam will start to burn at about 650 degrees ...


3

Of course if you can get a camera up (or down) the flue then you might be able to see excessive build up of carbon (etc.) deposits. However, it will be as black as can be up there and the small light on most USB type endoscopes might not be bright enough to really make an accurate assessment. Generally, if you're thinking the chimney might need cleaning, ...


3

No. That would be like sealing the bottom side of a sponge--moisture will travel through it to emerge in other areas. You can probably accomplish the repair even in winter. A water hose will quickly melt snow and ice from the areas you need to access, or use scaffolding and other hardware to work over it.


3

You need to slide that handle over to the larger slot and then pull it down or push it up. Ok, good you got it. It was hard to tell from the picture which way it operated. You could try some WD-40 but these dampers are pretty cheaply made and don't have a precision fit. You should try working it back and forth to loosen it up a bit.


2

This is common but its also a big issue. I doubt that this has to do with your house foundation although it could be a factor. The main cause would be a weak footing below your chimney. The fact that you are having a dry year might have caused the footings to move earlier but if they weren't up to spec then it was going to move. You have to figure that ...


2

Why not try something like this: set up two anchor points, such as large hookeyes, screwed into the wooden siding on either side of the house in line with the chimney attach a safety line to one hookeye and toss it over the peak if the roof near the chimney attach to the other hookeye leaving some slack. attach your safety line to the transverse line. You ...


2

Backfill the hole with dirt/fill to about 10-12" below the surface. You should compact the soil frequently as you go - don't wait until the end. Wetting it will help compact it. After the soil add 6-8" of 1/2" crushed gravel. Compact this. Last, add 4-6" of concrete. Unless you plan on parking something exceptionally heavy, you can use any concrete ...


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