27

If the TV will be on a pivot arm the answer is absolutely not. If it will be tight to the wall, as you say, and generally nobody will be physically handling the TV (tilting or moving, e.g. to plug in game consoles or whatever) then it can be quite safe especially if you use several (4?) toggle bolts along the top edge of the bracket. You don't need them on ...


20

There's a few things in here so let's cover them one at a time Can I support a TV mount with only drywall? If we're talking a modern TV (i.e. a 2015+ 4k TV) then yes. I recently had my living room TV die and I bought a 65" 4k TV. It weighs perhaps 50 lbs, which is well within the tolerances of drywall using a flush-mount. I would buy either the best ...


14

Metal studs? Welcome to the world of the "self-drilling sheet metal screw" Image from "Albanycountyfasteners.com" never heard of them, not associated in any way. You don't need ones with a rubber washer, but this was the first image that wasn't impossible to copy - you can get them with various head types to match your wall mount ...


12

I had these on painted wooden cabinet doors. I slid dental floss behind the plastic part which cut the plastic latch off, leaving the foam adhered to the door. Then I peeled the foam off by hand and it did no damage. I couldn't believe how easy it was! I thought it was stuck for good.


12

I'd place some sort of wall/fence around the outside. You could use two or three segments of a gate system like this: Or for a more DIY solution, you could build a fence on a plywood base with rubber feet to hold it in place. I would not recommend using heavy furniture to block access, as it will (1) block heat circulation and (2) in the event that your ...


6

It sounds as if the vent is completely open - hope that isn't the case. It could be dangerous. Assuming you have some type of vent cover on it I would cut and attach a piece of wire or even cloth mesh over the top or just under the vent cover. The wire would probably work best under the vent cover. You could attach it to the cover itself or the ductwork.


6

Open up wall where you want to mount the TV, add some wood crossing, re-drywall, install your kit correctly. I would go so far as adding a full wood "box" so that you have an area parallel to the metal studs that can help support the crosses.


5

Round-head wood screw OR Truss- or pan-head sheet metal screw Either one will work fine. The stresses on that screw would likely be minimal and would be tensile rather than shear, so use whichever one is easiest to find in a 3/16" (#10) diameter with a head that fits through the outer hole.


5

Search or shop for tension pole room divider for a solution that a child is unlikely to be able to move or tip over. If you want to do it yourself then you can first install four tension poles in a small rectangle and then screw or clamp three sections of plastic or metal screen to make a box-shaped barrier. All your screws or other fasteners go into the ...


5

You could surround it with a fence barrier that you attach to the wall, you can split it open and attach it to the walls on either side of the heater to provide a protective space (being sure to keep adequate clearance from the heater to the fence - one heater manufacturer recommends 3 feet in front and 12 inches to the sides of the heater): They are ...


4

You may not be able to find a timer that's designed to directly switch that much, but you can find a timer that switches a lot less, and use it to switch the coil of a relay that can switch whatever load you require. Relay coils take very little power to switch, and relay contacts can be had as large as you could possible need, or larger. However, if you ...


4

I think that what you want is an In-Use Cover. Secondly, baby fencing is a must. If you don't have some, or don't need it here, you'll need it somewhere. If you don't want to attach it to the wall (understandable), just set something heavy (like a box or bucket of stuff) on the inside and oustide of the fence to support it and keep baby from knocking it ...


4

Locking the breaker is certainly an option (probably a good one). I would consider it a hassle to have to unlock the breaker before work and having to relock when done. However, I'd rather do that than have my child lose a finger. In addition to shielding our children from things it is important that we teach them to respect the shop area and to respect ...


4

Dupont does not recommend Tyvek for interior walls. That said, I've seen DIY sites recommending it over studs to protect insulation as you suggest. What might be the concerns that Dupont has for interior use? Offhand, I can think of two: A vapor barrier can cause condensation in walls. However, Tyvek is not a vapor barrier Fire safety might be a concern....


4

TRR are required by the NEC as of 2008 and contain built in shutters that prevent the insertion of an object into a single hole at a time. I could say that its obvious that most kids are going to try to only insert a single sharp object into the outlet, but I don't have any study to back that up. However, there is a widely cited research study done by the ...


4

I think the most simple solution is this installed close to the ceiling: Assuming the surrounding paint is white, this really shouldn't require painting since it's one small hole and you could just use white wood filler to make the holes disappear once removed.


3

Along with arc-fault breakers protecting some areas of the home, "tamper-resistant" outlets are also required. They don't allow insertion into just one slot--both slots must be pressed together as an actual plug would do. I get the sense that you're asking about protecting little people. I'd either use plugs or install tamper-resistant outlets if I had ...


3

I would not consider this solution inexpensive, but not bad compared to hospital bills. There are devices known as circuit breaker lockouts: A number of sources exist on the internet, with varying prices starting from slightly under US$20. I used the search terms "universal circuit breaker lockout" to find representative samples. The more economical ...


3

Having done 3D printing with ABS myself, I'm familiar with this challenge. You need to exhaust the fumes--that's the long and short of it. Locate the printer near a window, open the window, and have a fan blowing air out the window every time you use the printer. Crack a window on the other side of your house for make-up air purposes. Or print with PLA, ...


3

Similar type devices are used in homes of folks suffering from Alzheimer's or Dementia. This Caring Home.org has reviews of a few such devices. Cookstop review Cookstop site HomeSense review HomeSense site Stove Guard Stove Guard site Most of the devices are easy to install, requiring only a screwdriver for installation. I do not personally recommend ...


3

Look into a downdraft table that you can exhaust outside. These are typically used for sanding or painting but the premise is the same. The table is perforated and sucks air down and then out to a dust collector or other exaust mechanism. You would place the printer on the table and ensure the exaust is running while you print.


3

I used the hair dryer to soften the glue then scraped it off. It worked well but then I noticed my laminate cabinets started to bulge where I had heated it up! Something to be wary of if using the hair dryer method.


3

Keep in mind that TR outlets are a relatively new requirement. A quick search shows 2008 in the NEC, which typically has some lag time for state adoption. Once adopted, the NEC has immediate effect on new homes and major renovations. But there are plenty of older houses - plenty of circuits are still without GFCI or AFCI or even grounded at all, because if ...


3

Extend it up higher and put a 90 or U bend with a grille on it.


3

My guess is that as the screws had come loose as they were so close to the edge of the wall with not much wall to hold them in place. Fixing the broken corner beading might not be worth it if you can cover it up with painted timber. As this beading goes all the way up the corner and if you pull it wrong, it may make it worse. If you have access to the wall ...


3

I don't have experience in dealing with metal studs or installing TV-s so I cannot answer your question but others already offered good advice on those topics. You (OP), however, mentioned several times that this is not your property; you're renting. In a rental property I wouldn't attempt any of these steps suggested in the other answers to avoid any kind ...


3

The steel "studs" are about 14ga galvanized steel - they're used because they're light, strong, and cheaper to handle (albeit you can't nail drywall to them, it must be screwed.) What I would do is use toggle bolts (image below) and sink them into the studs. The "wings" on the toggle do require a slightly larger hole (about the size of a ...


3

Here's some info which is applicable to the other answers that suggest using sheet metal screws. At least for steel studs, there is readily available engineering data that can be used to judge how well this will work. (TLDR: it should work fine). Background - steel studs are manufactured to standards. So it doesn't matter who made them, you can assume they'...


3

The TEST button is a pretty darn authentic test The TEST function on a GFCI is required to create a current imbalance in the sensing toroid, exactly mimicking the action of a real ground fault. (See UL 943, clause 5.15.3 for the details.) So, you can be confident that a GFCI that trips when you push TEST will actually trip, whereas the TEST button on ...


2

Wappa Baby child proof door lever lock. The devices were attached to Andersen outside factory painted doors, and were affixed to the doors for three weeks. I manually pried the unlocked device by pulling on the swivel part. Start slowly, it will pop right off. I did three locks, 10 seconds each. BTW, the locks worked very well for us.


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