9

HCl can be combined with baking soda to form salt water and CO2. NaHCO3 + HCl = NaCl + H2O + CO2 NOTE this is exothermic and effervescent, mix slowly, adding the soda to the acid. In a wide-mouth container.


8

Vinegar and baking soda will produce carbon dioxide very quickly; the reaction will be over in a matter of minutes. And dry ice requires special handling and going back and forth to the store many times to procure fresh ice. A better way to continuously produce 1 to 3 humans' worth of carbon dioxide over a period of about 3 to 4 days is via (yeast) ...


6

Most mosquito traps produce carbon dioxide by burning propane: http://home.howstuffworks.com/mosquito-magnet2.htm


6

A metal bucket is much MORE prone to be attacked by acids in general than most plastics, especially those commonly used for buckets. As it's "waste acid" throw in a box or two of baking soda and you'll neutralize it right then and there. Preferably outside due to the release of carbon dioxide. Or use marble/limestone chips or dust.


5

As my high school chemistry instructor made us learn: Do as you oughta - add acid to water. If you add water to acid, the reaction dynamics work out badly and you get the MSDS warning - the water boils, this spits acid solution all over, and is dangerous. If you add acid to water, the reaction dynamics work in a more favorable fashion, and nothing ...


4

Just mix baking soda with vinegar and you will get all the CO2 you want. Make sure that the jar is big enough because this reaction causes bubbles; the liquid will expand. Also, keep one more thing in mind CO2 is heavier than air meaning that you should somehow put the zapper inside the jar so it would be near CO2 and not over it; because I don't think that ...


4

There are several independent variables to manage in a swimming pool or hot tub: pH balance halogen balance calcium hardness total dissolved solids Nearly everyone is aware of pH balance, but what most people don't seem to understand is that pH can swing wildly unless total alkalinity is increased sufficiently to provide an "inertial buffer" with total ...


4

You would need to send samples to a chemical analysis laboratory to get a more definitive answer, but the brick was likely never in direct contact with the chemicals and after 10 years I would expect they off gassed anything they might have picked up. If you don’t notice an unusual smell from them, they are probably fine.


4

...start with re-evaluating your perception that it "needs cleaned." Or stop smoking around your computer. As a computer professional, I have pretty much never cleaned a motherboard. Occasionally vacuumed out dust bunnies, but I prefer to locate computers where dust bunnies are less likely to accumulate in them. I have occasionally replaced computers that ...


4

Plain old rubbing alcohol would be a decent option for flushing cigarette smoke residue without affecting the solder mask layer of the mobo pcb like naptha can, or harming components like acetone can. spray it wet with alcohol,keep spraying until the runoff is not gross, then go over it with a soft toothbrush or other such brush, then hit it again with an ...


3

I know this is late, but I'm pretty sure you could get away with PAM or grease for releasing aluminum from concrete. Commercial release products are an assortment of commonly used items like mineral oil, or silicon lube, or graphite; less common are metal stearates (like zinc stearate in a can). I have played around with zinc stearate. I still have some that ...


3

It depends (but likely no). IMO, duct cleaning does have it's place in today's world (pet hair/allergen reduction for example). However, it likely only needs done once every 10-15 years in most cases. Duct sealer is basically like the sealant you can put in a bicycle tube to fix a leak except that since ducts aren't a completely closed system like a tube, ...


3

Actually I've found the perfect chemical for stripping Danish Oil: The exact same spray disinfectant that caused the problem in the first place! Spray it on and leave it for a few hours and the oil scrapes off without damaging the wood.


3

It is likely milk-based paint, which often resists remover. Unlike normal paints that just need a solvent to remove, milk paints require a caustic, such as lye. Oddly enough, it sounds like PeelAway 1 could work to remove it, but another option would be Real Milk Paint remover. It is essentially lye with some added stuff to make it a bit easier to handle. ...


2

Yes. I used to keep my acid in a large container along with some paint thinners and removers. Even with the acid bottle tightly sealed, the metal paint thinner containers rusted after a couple of weeks. Will enough vapors get at your ducts to rust them? Can't say, but it's worth the effort to wrap them. Sounds like your major problems will be containing ...


2

I had three different pieces that I had rubbed with Danish oil and they looked beautiful! I wondered how I could have missed such a forgiving finish for so long. But they weren't drying after a week and I was getting worried. So I gave them a day in the direct sunlight at about 85 degrees and it baked the finish in and on the pieces. Problem solved!. I ...


2

My Danish oil also wasn't drying. But then I put olive oil on it, and worked that in. The result was that both oils worked into the wood without any stickiness! The reason I have been informed is that ANY oil would really do the job, it's just that the Danish oil obviously needed a helping hand to absorb. So just apply and work in, some basic oil (I used ...


2

I had the same problem. I wiped the tacky areas with a very small amount of olive oil. Problem solved.


2

Danish oil, like linseed and tung oil, can take up to a month for fully cure (from inside, out). Too old an oil may also turn tacky (surface dried but oil-in-wood hasn't). The cure for either is a mineral spirit or turpentine wipe down, several times, spanning several days. Don't recoat until you don't smell the finish at the surface. Then, recoat with a ...


2

Get ready to buy some chemicals and clean your filter. You need a chelating agent (for pools often sold as "Metal Free") to bind the metals. Adding a clarifier will help coagulate that plus the other hazy junk so they form particles large enough to get stuck in your filter.


2

Vinegar will cause slow release of CO2 from limestone. A fist size rock will take days to dissolve. The stuff is cheap at most sand and gravel stores. Sodium Bicarb reacts much to quickly for your purpose, while keeping fermentation going long term is a pain.


2

no - you are being offered a great big glass of snake oil duct cleaning is already a huge scam. EPA and health canada have already for years been warning people about the risks. this is just a new twist on an already deceptive industry


2

Using any volatile and flammable fluid indoors can pose serious health and property damage if used in a reckless manner. By reckless I should say "not adhering to the warnings by the manufacturer". If the item to be cleaned can not be relocated outside than precautions should be taken to limit the build up of explosive vapors. Allowing outside air to ...


2

Bleach and chlorine can get nasty very fast if you try to put other chemicals in the tank to help the tablet dissolve. I think the safest bet is to fill your tank with warm water and use that for several flushes. Don't use water that is too hot because that could start to cause issues with the wax seal on the toilet if that gets too warm. Just warm, ...


2

Try with boiling white-vinegar, I use it to clean limestone buildup aluminium and steel pans. A commercial produt I found very effective is 'Viakal'


2

I would wash them in a bucket or tub with plenty of detergent and water as hot as the garments can take. Then rinse them with a hose onto grass or soil. Check to see if grease is removed before putting in the regular washer.


2

Do not use metal! That goes for any acid. Generally its pretty easy to find good resources on plastic manufacturers websites. Try here. (muriatic acid = Hydrochloric acid) https://www.plasticsintl.com/chemical-resistance-chart This chart gives data for 0.4M and 4M. If this is waste acid, you are probably more in the range of 0.4 but you might as well ...


1

Usually those chairs take obvious UV damage from the sun. This can weaken them. (it does the same to child car seats, one legitimate reason to throw old ones out). If that's not a problem, the chairs are probably saveable... ...but you need to learn to paint. One rattle-can should do all 3 chairs. You went through a whole can because you're misusing it ...


1

Many of the commercial products are buffered in some way to try and reduce the impact on metals, since DWV plumbing may commonly be made from copper, brass, lead, or iron, as well as plastics. In the USA, aluminum is not, to my knowledge, a common drain pipe material. Sodium hydroxide (lye) is primarily of use against grease based clogs, as it turns the ...


1

Be sure to check the toxicity of all these products. It's impossible if the products are not labelled properly. But keep in mind, all that will be filing your living space... forever... And imperceptible, incremental toxic injury is as deadly as a massive exposure. Been there. Scorecard is one place, www.ciin.org and www.chemicalinjury.net will get you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible