28

A diagram put out by the US Product Safety Comission shows that the left leg and left arm/hand are the most commonly parts of the body injured by chainsaws: (Source: OSHA Web site) If the dots on the diagram represent frequency of injury, protecting the left hand would help prevent a common source of injury. The State Compensation Insurance Fund website ...


8

My saw has a brake that can protect me in case of a kickback. It sits in front of my left hand. Push forward to engage, pull back to release. Or it could be a maintenance issue: Do you fill the bar oil when you fill the gas? Do you clean the machine after using it? Including the drive gear and the slot in the edge of the bar? Do you loosen the chain when ...


7

No. Chainsaw chaps and a hardhat (and ear and eye protection) make sense when using a chainsaw. Your hands are generally on the saw, even when things go wrong. The hardhat and chaps (leg protection) protect the areas that are most often involved in the saw cutting the operator. Given what I know about how chainsaw chaps work, I doubt any gloves you could ...


6

The reason is that when you start the engine with the sparkplug in, you are compressing the air in the cylinder. When the engine is running, the previous ignition cycle provides enough power to do it, but when you are starting up the motor that power is provided by you. Additionally, compressing air requires a substantial amount of energy. When the ...


5

Gauge is the thickness of the drive tangs on the saw chain. Chain gauge must match the groove width on the bar. The only effect chain gauge will have on standard spur sprockets is the contact area it presents on the spur teeth, thicker gauge = wider contact area. Rim Sprockets use a pocket that must be wide enough to allow the drive tangs to seat. Pitch ...


4

It might be OK for a bit but I probably wouldn't do it. You could look up your owner's manual to see if they say anything. If you must use the chainsaw and have nothing else on hand, surely motor oil is better than nothing. I think bar oil is stickier than regular motor oil to prevent splattering as much. FWIW I like to buy the "biodegradable" chain oil, ...


4

Chain saws have what is called a diaphragm carburetor as opposed to the carburetor with a float. The float bowl in those types hold gas and need to be drained and usually have a drain plug. The carb on the saw holds very little gas so just run it until it conks out for lack of gas.


3

you shouldn't run anything but bar oil on a chainsaw bar, but not because of the saw (even though it sticks better to the bar and lubricates the chain better). its the environment and your lungs. engine oils usually have one or two zinc thiophosphate compounds added into them. its not good for you to breathe this in in aerosol form (like grinding ...


3

Why yes, there is. Consult the owners manual (in paper or on-line), and it will tell you what that is and how to measure it on your particular saw. Too tight causes excessive heat and wear. Too loose can cause the chain to jump off the bar and result in an accident.


3

You will spray motor oil everywhere, and you will run out of oil quickly, and then burn up the bar and chain. That being said, I sometimes use a mix of bar and gear oil or motor oil in winter, when it's so cold outside that the bar oil won't flow quickly enough. On such days, I would only mix about 1 part motor oil with 10 parts bar oil (or 1 part gear oil ...


3

No. Or yes. It isn't like gearing. A shorter chain doesn't compound torque like a smaller gear does. The amount of force applied at any point on the chain is identical. However, the shorter bar limits how much contact the chain can make with the wood. Herein lies the difference. If you're cutting 16" of wood rather than 18" the motor isn't working as ...


2

Some saw manufacturers, when starting is difficult, specifically direct the user to lock the throttle "On" to start, then depress the throttle immediately, to bring it to idle. If you do mess with the idle screw, make sure that you do not increase the idle speed such that the clutch drives the chain to move when idling. You might try "flashing" the choke a ...


2

Most two cycle engines are sensitive to the newer gasoline blends that can contain up to 10% ethanol. Get a small bottle of fuel additive for small engines and add a small amount of that into your gas tank. It should run a lot better after that. I had a similar problem with my leaf blower last year and this did the trick. Star Tron is a much better brand ...


2

I have a Ryobi 40v electric, which isn't a "real" chainsaw (it has a much slower chain speed), but 30w works just fine. I haven't had any splatter or mess, and it's cheap. My chain doesn't seem to be stretching more than expected. I mention it because more and more homeowner types will be moving to the new breed of electrics as they continue to improve. I ...


2

I would get some heavy duty pipe jacks to support the trunk, placing them on a square piece of 1" plywood to distribute the weight. Prop the tree with 4x4 lumber to prevent rolling; one end in a hole in the turf, the other end nailed to the tree. Once stabilized, cut all extraneous non-supporting branches, limbs and roots including the portion that hangs ...


2

My concern with used motor oil would be that used motor oil has all kinds of contaminants from the crankcase that would be just terrible for your lungs (oil mist) and the environment. Nasty things like lead from the bearings, chromium, etc. No one in their right mind would want to dissolve that toxic soup into a mist they're going to toss into the air ...


2

They are generally called "bar bolts". These bolts are often pressed into the chain saw housing from the back side, it can be a complicated repair requiring significant disassembly of the saw. Also, I do not see them on the parts diagram. This doesn't mean they are not available, but to find out you would have to call Ryobi customer service and explain what ...


2

The helmet is designed to protect you from falling objects. It is also the mounting point for the face shield and ear protection. The helmet will also provide limited protection from the saw in the event the saw were to kick-back or the operator lost control and the chain were to impact the operators' head. It will not provide protection from a running saw ...


2

Having done this with many chainsaws over the years (Danarm, Stihl, Husquvarna), the power from the engine gets shared between the number of teeth doing the cutting as well as the drive sprocket / chain losses and the chain / bar friction. Then you need to consider the type of teeth - some are designed to better handle harder woods like oak and other teeth ...


1

Look for the "H" & "L" carb adjustment screws. Get a small screwdriver that will fit those screws. Crank it up, keep it running with the trigger. Adjust the "L" screw one way or the other, in quarter turn incriments, until it idles how you want. Keep track of the turns, in case that doesn't work. Wind it up again, H screw may need a little tweak to get ...


1

On a day with calm winds, cut 3/4 through each leg, near the ground, with the cuts all starting from the same compass direction. Post an observer to watch for movement in the upper portion of the structure and warn the sawyer. Pull the structure down with human, animal, or machine power using suitably strong and long straps in the opposite direction as the ...


1

This is one of those questions that elicits much gnashing of teeth, along with oil change interval and 87 octane vs. "premium". It comes down to opinion and the various factors: Length of storage (weeks, months, longer) Engine type (two-stroke vs. four, cylinder wall linings, carb type, etc.) Climate (humidity, temperature) Oil and fuel types Running a two-...


1

I have never had a problem with running used oil in my saws. I have Stihls and Huskies. Just make sure you filter the used oil to get out any kind of foreign debris.


1

I suppose it depends on your definition of OK. Will the saw explode the second you run it? No, but if your unit is under warranty then the manufacture sure will deny any warranty claim if they can determine that the wrong oil was used. All motor oil is not equal either as it comes in varying viscosities and types. Sticking with "bar oil" will ensure you ...


1

Chains do come off when they heat up if they are not tight. There are usually 2 bolts on the side of the bar. Break these loose then there will be a screw to tighten /loosen. Loosen the bar move the bar back until the chain will go on. Once the chain is on tighten the chain and rotate it by hand pulling down in the middle to check for tension. Once the guide ...


1

What you should also realize is that the chain will become loose after continuous use. This is because frictional heat will expand the metal chain slightly. That's why I like to keep my chainsaw blade just a bit on the tight side (and always well oiled). This is how I tension my saw: loosen the tensioning screw just enough for the bar to move easily. Then ...


1

Since the number of links is larger(81 instead of 74), there is low chance that it would fit properly. What I suggest is to check the chain details(gauge,pitch and drive link) before you get one. You can find the details printed on the bar or in the manual. If not, take the chain with you to a local hardware store, they can tell you all the details just ...


1

Presumably the new bar is either longer or wider or both than the old bar? Number of links is to fit the bar - pitch is to fit the sprocket.


1

funny, but the examples show also that when a hand was cut, it was very often not the chain operator, but somebody helping ! So for your specific question regarding gloves, i would think it is not that useful preventing YOU from being cut at all, but more to prevent you from debri and getting splinters when actually doing the job itself, cutting down trees ...


1

stihl chains have oil groves that keep you bar and chain oiled as well as having 2 diff types of chains for kick back the green label is for less kick back for less experienced wood cutters and the yellow for pro wood cutters with bigger hp saws. my advice is stick with the stihl chains they are desighned for your saw


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