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3

You need to just install a new loop. But, fortunately, the fix is pretty cheap and simple. I don't think glue is going to do it. You'll want to shop around for one that matches the color, size, and so forth, but here's a ring on Home Depot's website as an example, and another one from Menard's website. You might want to take the chandelier apart first and ...


3

There are several possibilities. First, rule out the obvious stuff: Watch the electric eye sensors as the door opens and closes - confirm that the sensors remain aligned (the led lights on both remain lit during garage door travel, typically yellow on one, and green on the other); if there is a loose wire or sensor, or if there is excessive vibration or ...


2

Another thing to consider is that the effective load on the chains is increased if the chains are not vertical, as would be the case if the chains are attached to the corners of the item, but are all attached to a single central attachment point above. Multiply the chain's working load limit by the cosine of the angle between the chain and vertical to get ...


2

The proper name would be a TV lift. If I were you, I'd start my design around 2 Long drawer slides mounted vertically and a counter weight or a linear actuator or screw drive for an electronic version. These parts aren't cheap, however. A lift kit costs less than $500 and you know it'll work. Be sure the diy version won't cost more!


2

I had this happen to one of my garage doors. The sensor "eyes" are attached to the rails. Over time the bottom of one of the rails worked itself a little loose and I found that the vibration of the door coming down would rattle the rail and disturb or misalign the sensor to the point that it would read an interruption and the door would reopen. I found other ...


1

I suggest you buy files and do the resharpening manually. It saves some bucks and time. If you don't want to do the labor, there is electric chain sharpener which works pretty good. I always keep 3 extra chains with me. When one gets dull, I replace it and continue the cutting. At night, when I come back home, I sharpen them all one by one.


1

Yeah, when I first started using chainsaws, I was naïve to the idea of "sharpening a chain". The very fact that you were able to get 9 hours out of it tells me you were like me. My first chain, the chain cut subtly worse and worse and worse and worse, and I didn't realize it, because like the frog in the cookpot... until I couldn't stand it anymore. First ...


1

Any blade (even a lawnmower) will dull after constant use, but a chainsaw is doing a lot of work, and most of it by the blade. I would say your blade is indeed dull. The catch on what to do from here is dependent upon how often you intend to use the chainsaw. If this is a one-off project, you're probably better off buying a new chain. If this will be a ...


1

I have had this type behavior show up on one of my garage door openers. The problem has actually developed progressively over time. At this point I actually need to keep holding the close button down to get the door to close. (Opening works like normal). I did adjust the down pressure two different times and it helped for a short time but the closure problem ...


1

Depends on where it snapped. If the '8s' just pulled apart, then yes, bend it closed again around the anchor it pulled off of. If the ball chain broke and one part is long enough, remove the connector between the '8' and the ball chain and remove the short piece and insert the longer piece then reassemble. You can also get a connector that attaches two ends ...


1

The safe working load limit is generally 1/4 or 1/5 the minimum breaking strength. So there is a buffer and safeguard already built in if you are using the safe working limit number. However, you should confirm this with the chain's packaging or identification. There are cheap chains at the big-box stores that will have 1/2 ratios - do not use a chain ...


1

The chain configuration does not just affect the amount of support. It also controls the angle of the seat of the swing as it moves through its arc. If you use a single hook on each end, the seat is always perpendicular to a line that extends from the center of the seat to the hook. If you use two hooks on each end, the seat will track differently, ...


1

The naive approach is to just put a bolt through the chain, below the plank, at the appropriate height, possibly with some washers around the chain to sit between the plank and the side of the bolt. My biggest worry with this approach is how the bolt will interact with the other hanging chain link that passes through the same chain link that the bolt passes ...


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