29

My speculation is the reason you can't find resources for that specific approach is because that approach is inferior in almost all ways to modern tub construction. Most importantly: tile and grout is mostly water-tight; fiberglass or cast-iron tubs are entirely water-tight. As you probably know, any amount of regular water leakage into unintended areas can ...


14

You can make a tub out of tile. There are some issues to think about: you will need a thicker more rigid structure for the tub and they can be made custom to an area and look great. The massive amount of tile and concrete cools the water very quickly which can be mitigated somewhat. I tried several methods and found a water jacket water heater with a ...


12

I've cut plenty of tile and don't recall kickback occurring, at least in the sense we think of with table saws. For one thing, the rotating mass of a 4" diamond wheel is a small fraction of that of a 12" table saw blade. For another, it's almost physically impossible to get the kind of sudden engagement of blade to material with a diamond wheel and ...


10

I've used a scrap of wood of some thickness enough that when the bit goes through it will be held straight. Drill that at the bench. Use carpet tape to attach this block to the tile, and drill through the guide hole. Being tile, you could use whatever strong mounting tape you have handy, and scrape it off when you're done. Point is, it's easy to make a jig ...


10

Put a couple of pieces of masking tape on the wall. Then mark the intended hole location, and carefully make small cut in the masking tape. Also scratch an initial divot into the tile. Finally, cordless screwdrivers don't have nearly as accurate bearings as high speed drills, nor do they have as precisely machined collet/chucks. So your drill bit might not ...


10

Pick up a Diamond Drill Bit for porcelain tile. These don't have a tip so you need to start them at a 45 degree angle and slowly move it perpendicular to the tile. Check out YouTube for videos on proper technique. To make sure it doesn't move on you get a thin piece of plywood with a hole drilled in it. Duct tape the plywood to the tile so the hole in the ...


10

Kickback yes. Kickback like most have experienced trying to push a 4x8 through a crappy table saw... no What you will get with a tile saw is more of a blip. And the structure of the saw or table may "move" but it won't be with any umpphhh. What will happen more likely is that your tile will jerk (a tiny bit normally but I have seen guys have ...


9

Kickback on a toothed saw occurs because you're forcing more material into the tooth than the cutting force can handle, so the cutting force is translated into movement force. A tile saw has no teeth. It's an abrasive cutter (hence why it's a wet cutter as well). It's not impossible, but as DMoore notes, it's either a function of over-pushing or dull blades. ...


9

Use a small nail set or other hardened metal tool and a hammer to make a tiny chip in the tile glaze. This will entrap the bit tip and allow you to start drilling without walk. It may help to hold the tool at an angle to allow its edge to penetrate the glaze. Be gentle or you can crack the tile. It doesn't take much of a tap.


6

I have used a drill guide with a suction cup for this which worked very well. You use just position it over your mark carefully and use the suction cup to stick it to the surrounding tiles. The image below shows what it looks like, it comes with various guide holes to match your drill bit. https://www.screwfix.com/p/erbauer-diamond-tile-drill-guide/84524


5

I used glass/tile bits when I needed to make holes in my porcelain tiles. What I found was that bit came to a reasonably sharp point. After aligning the tip of the bit right where I wanted it, I simply pushed the bit into the surface of the tile and it would make a very small, precise divot right where I wanted the hole to be centered. After that, I started ...


4

Affordable? I have no idea. Affordability is relative to the size of your bank account. Reasonable? Probably not, they don't seem very comfortable. Do a Google search for "tile tubs" or just see the image below. If you get inspired by the image then make sure to give the outer edge a gentle slope into the tub. Water-proofing is probably on-par with ...


4

A diamond-tipped bit will drill through either material so just buy it. Trying to save 50% on a carbide bit for ceramic tile is just not worth the risk of ruining potentially porcelain tile.


4

I highly recommend getting a better tool (or tools). While conceptually there is no difference between a power screwdriver (which you have) and a real drill, the drill will (if it is any good): Have adjustable speeds. This lets you go slow to get started, speed up to get through a lot of material quickly, slow down when you get to tough parts, etc. Have a ...


3

Start Small get Pilot hole and work your way up. When the tile is already on the wall and we need precise holes it is the same every time and pretty sure I have answered this. I use a piece of duct tape over the location the holes need to be and mark the holes on the duct tape. I then find the very smallest bit I have and try to make it about 1/4" in. ...


2

The drill bits you use are extremely important. Also tiles vary a lot in hardness. Some bits work well on ordinary bathroom ceramic tile, but are frustratingly slow drilling porcelain tile.


2

With the small SDS drill the wall tiles went off like a dream. The floor tiles were thicker than usual, and placed not in tile adhesive, but mortar. The small drill was not enough to remove them in reasonable time. After realizing that the underfloor must also be replaced, I left that work to a contractor, who sent me two rugged man and some of Hilti's ...


2

I guess we can pick up cleaning stuff here. I like borax powder for scrubbing. 20 Mule Team borax is a brand in the US and it is cheap. You should be able to get it in a big cardboard box. It is a light abrasive but will not scratch the tile. I use plenty and it does not have chlorine or acid in it that could cause trouble. Mostly I like that it is ...


2

There is a fin (aka "riving knife") behind the back of the cutting wheel, and it holds the splash guard. If the fin is mis-aligned with the wheel itself, then sideways pressure of the tile (at the cut) against the wheel will occur, causing the tile to lift. This lifting is the equivalent of the incipient stage of kick-back on a wood table saw. ...


1

Ended up removing the existing leveling concrete, putting down primer, then adding a poured leveling compound, then a Ditra decoupling membrane, and finally tiling over the top. here is a better pic of the starting surfaces: And then the leveling compound (notice the green laser helping us maintain the gravity level of the compound): And Finally, DITRA ...


1

If you don't want a hole in the tile, get some hooks: If they're adhesive, remove the adhesive on the back, and use some MS Polymer caulk like Bostik MS118 to stick it to the wall. This has excellent adhesion to tile. If you use a hook that is designed to be mounted with a screw, make sure it looks like the one above, with the hook on the bottom. If the ...


1

Drill a 1" deep hole into a grout line (or at a corner between 4 tiles) and use a simple plastic anchor and screw hook. For a 1.5lb wall clock ... You don't need a tile bit (use the grout line) You don't need a joist. You don't need to drill deep enough to hit any wires or pipes. You don't need to rely on command strips or glue. The tile cement and ...


1

Easiest way is to use silicone caulking or like substance. Silicone will hold up 1.5 pounds quite easily and can be cleaned off ceramic tile completely. And can be cleaned off clock, yet it may stain the back.


1

It is common to drill through bathroom ceramic tile and its backing to install plastic anchors for screws for grab bars. If there is a stud where you want to place the hook, then an anchor would not be absolutely needed, but you would need a long enough screw to reach 1 inch into the stud. However, you could drill a large enough diameter hole into the stud ...


1

Yes, you can vinyl plank straight over tile. I did it for a bathroom and it turned out great. As far as leveling, unless we're talking something massive, I'd just buy a decent waterproof padding. It should cover most of the imperfections. This assumes the floor itself is level. If it's not, you'll need to add some floor leveler first. To finish the room, I ...


1

The imperfections will be felt through the vinyl flooring if you do nothing. Option 1: You should remove any tiles whose edges are not flush; hammer them, chisel them, whatever. Next you should pour self-leveling cement and sweep it into all of the grooves. Now you can install the vinyl. Option 2: Remove all of the tile until you get to the flat sub-floor ...


1

The correct solution leaves a small gap at both ends of the bullnose to silicone to those surfaces. The correct way to adhere the bullnose is thinset in the hollow portion of the tile but that doesn't seem totally feasible in this case, you could reattach with polyurethane construction adhesive down the center of the bullnose or something like schluter ...


1

No, there isn't. You'll want to follow a common strategy of either running a full tile or a joint down the center of the room so that the rows at the edges look appropriate. Snap one or two chalk lines on the floor as references, then snap one or two at 90 degrees to get your joint lines straight. With a wet saw these types of cuts are not difficult nor time ...


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