29

My speculation is the reason you can't find resources for that specific approach is because that approach is inferior in almost all ways to modern tub construction. Most importantly: tile and grout is mostly water-tight; fiberglass or cast-iron tubs are entirely water-tight. As you probably know, any amount of regular water leakage into unintended areas can ...


23

The best approach is a tile saw that can make small precise cuts along the length of a tile. It is a power tool like a table saw but uses a diamond impregnated blade and a water cooling system. They can be bought or rented. A cruder approach if the tiles are not too big (4x4 should not be a problem)and there are not too many tiles to cut is a tile nipper. ...


16

I own a pair of tile nippers - I bought them first, they were cheap. Unfortunately, they didn't work (pretty much "at all") on the tiles I was using - breaks would be more or less random. So I bought one of these dry diamond blades for an angle grinder - if you don't own an angle grinder, this might just be one of the few times I'd say that the cheapest ...


14

You can make a tub out of tile. There are some issues to think about: you will need a thicker more rigid structure for the tub and they can be made custom to an area and look great. The massive amount of tile and concrete cools the water very quickly which can be mitigated somewhat. I tried several methods and found a water jacket water heater with a ...


12

I've cut plenty of tile and don't recall kickback occurring, at least in the sense we think of with table saws. For one thing, the rotating mass of a 4" diamond wheel is a small fraction of that of a 12" table saw blade. For another, it's almost physically impossible to get the kind of sudden engagement of blade to material with a diamond wheel and ...


10

You should use an abrasive grinding tool with a relatively fine grit or tooth, not a cutting tool. You don't want anything that can catch the tile and shatter it, and you want to operate at a fairly high rpm to reduce chatter and grab. Apply pressure parallel to the face of the tile only--don't push inward or outward or you risk spalling the face of the tile....


10

Kickback yes. Kickback like most have experienced trying to push a 4x8 through a crappy table saw... no What you will get with a tile saw is more of a blip. And the structure of the saw or table may "move" but it won't be with any umpphhh. What will happen more likely is that your tile will jerk (a tiny bit normally but I have seen guys have ...


10

Pick up a Diamond Drill Bit for porcelain tile. These don't have a tip so you need to start them at a 45 degree angle and slowly move it perpendicular to the tile. Check out YouTube for videos on proper technique. To make sure it doesn't move on you get a thin piece of plywood with a hole drilled in it. Duct tape the plywood to the tile so the hole in the ...


10

Put a couple of pieces of masking tape on the wall. Then mark the intended hole location, and carefully make small cut in the masking tape. Also scratch an initial divot into the tile. Finally, cordless screwdrivers don't have nearly as accurate bearings as high speed drills, nor do they have as precisely machined collet/chucks. So your drill bit might not ...


10

I've used a scrap of wood of some thickness enough that when the bit goes through it will be held straight. Drill that at the bench. Use carpet tape to attach this block to the tile, and drill through the guide hole. Being tile, you could use whatever strong mounting tape you have handy, and scrape it off when you're done. Point is, it's easy to make a jig ...


9

Kickback on a toothed saw occurs because you're forcing more material into the tooth than the cutting force can handle, so the cutting force is translated into movement force. A tile saw has no teeth. It's an abrasive cutter (hence why it's a wet cutter as well). It's not impossible, but as DMoore notes, it's either a function of over-pushing or dull blades. ...


9

Use a small nail set or other hardened metal tool and a hammer to make a tiny chip in the tile glaze. This will entrap the bit tip and allow you to start drilling without walk. It may help to hold the tool at an angle to allow its edge to penetrate the glaze. Be gentle or you can crack the tile. It doesn't take much of a tap.


7

What's done is done. I'd grout and generally move on with life, and only revisit it if and when the tiles start popping on their own, which may never happen. You are NOT a professional tile installer who would be well advised to rip out and do it over for the sake of their reputation. So you don't need to act like one.


7

Use the “wet saw” for free at the place you bought the tiles. The store will usually include one cut per item bought for no charge. That’s what I’ve done (at one of the big-box stores). If you can’t get that where you bought, take them to the store which does have such a saw and pay 10¢ – 20¢ per cut.


6

4-1/4" and some larger wall tiles have bumps cast in that act as spacers. Unless you want a larger gap, no additional spacers are needed. Whether your particular tile has them is uncertain. They're often necessary to prevent sagging with heavier tile while the mortar or mastic sets.


6

This is a really really poor installation. Everything will have to be pulled up. Tiles will need to be cleaned or thrown away and reinstall. Issues: The mortar/cement isn't even covering under the mesh in some pictures. To do this type of install you need to cement/mortar the mesh to the floor and a skim coat on top. Once this dries you can continue ...


6

I have used a drill guide with a suction cup for this which worked very well. You use just position it over your mark carefully and use the suction cup to stick it to the surrounding tiles. The image below shows what it looks like, it comes with various guide holes to match your drill bit. https://www.screwfix.com/p/erbauer-diamond-tile-drill-guide/84524


5

If all interior walls or, if insulated exterior walls,no need to fill gap with anything. Just get your baseboard moldings up to finish the job


5

Check your Tile bit to see if you have melted the edge. normally it should feel nice and sharp against your finger. Hopefully you have a nice drill (generally battery operated may be a little on the light side). What I do, is get a straw filled with water, or a spray bottle, and get a helper to either "pipette" or spray water onto the hole while you drill....


5

You need a diamond tile saw, where you put the tile on a platform and slide it past the water-cooled blade. They are fast, precise and good for the hardest porcelain tiles. Expect to pay $300 and up. Straight cuts are the easiest. To cut out a square corner, make the two cuts with the tile upside down. The back of the tile will be a mess, but the business-...


5

This greatly depends on the type tile you have. If it is a manmade tile such as porcelain, or ceramic, then you don't have to worry about sealing it. Most natural stone tiles, especially softer or water permeable stone such as marble, limestone/travertine, and slate should be sealed as well. This would ideally be done prior to grouting to prevent the stone ...


5

Silicone caulk or silicone RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanizing) glue (pretty much the same thing with different labels.) Sticks pretty well, moisture helps it cure, and it can be peeled off when you want it gone.


5

I would use an oscillating multitool with a diamond blade. A small rotary tool with a diamond blade might also work. With either of these, I would have a spray bottle of water nearby and occasionally spray the tile with a bit to help the tile and blade stay cool. This will help cut/grind the tile more easily.


5

I used glass/tile bits when I needed to make holes in my porcelain tiles. What I found was that bit came to a reasonably sharp point. After aligning the tip of the bit right where I wanted it, I simply pushed the bit into the surface of the tile and it would make a very small, precise divot right where I wanted the hole to be centered. After that, I started ...


4

$65 at Harbor Freight or other import discounter. You are wasting your time with a scoring cutter. If you had a lot to do I would recommend a quality domestic saw, but for a one time job this saw will work so well you will kick yourself for not biting the bullet and buying one before you even started the job.


4

I would recommend heavy duty constructive adhesive followed by grout colored caulk that best matche the grout around the tiles https://www.google.com/search?q=grout+colored+caulk to minimize cost and work I would risk using the caulk as glue try to remove the old adhesive clean back of tile and wall well put a lot of construction adhesive on the back of ...


4

Dremel with a grinding wheel or a carbide cutoff blade. Do this OUTSIDE with a N95 mask, goggles, gloves and try to control the shards (arrange so the spray goes into a towel or use a wet/dry vac).


4

Tile mortar is actually fairly soft. If you have access to a belt sander, take a coarse grit to it. Otherwise, scrape at it with a robust flat tool like a cold chisel.


4

I had posted this as a comment but believe it should be an answer. Wow to me from that photo this is a full blown broken tile not a hair line crack that you would see in a natural stone. This porcelain tile should have no broken tiles. I hope you have not made the final payment and if you have contact your local contractors board this is unacceptable in my ...


4

Glop some epoxy on it. For a less blatant but still visible repair, mix some marble dust (given the tile color) into the epoxy, or choose a white rather than clear epoxy and mix (but do not mix too well, for this pattern) some pigment into it (after throughly mixing the epoxy, first.) Age can somewhat be inferred by how clean or dirty it is, as a chip will ...


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