6

Is it time based on the power consumption? I will try to be polite but Hell No. when your system is running at full load and hot the power may get close to RLA , RLA is like FLA for motors. If they are drawing less they are not fully loaded. Having a worn out compressor could cause a lower power consumption but then electrical parts would not be overheating....


5

You paid a higher cost to have an AC with the built-in breaker circuit to handle the output from a small solar system. The built-in breaker limits the size of the solar system that you can install for your house. I would look at it as a Marketing pitch. Is there some benefit to using this "solar ready" feature when I get solar installed? Or ...


4

A low charge can cause evaporator freezing. If your cap was bad that usually indicates an older system. Micro leaks have caught up, probably R22 and it is getting expensive. A 5 ton system will take 4-6 lbs normally to be fully charged but may give you another 5 trouble free years. In most cases the icing will get worse. It could also be a throttle valve ...


4

There may be some opinion on top of what I believe to be true. There are some large flex duct sizes but the ribs are horribly inefficient. Metal trunk is also better suited when going vertical it is easier to secure. Frame work is square to box-in a round trunk the box would be much larger. I have seen DIY main trunk in a home we were replacing the “mess” ...


4

There are a few causes for this, and the most common are in two categories - bad air flow and low refrigerant. Bad airflow can be caused by a dirty filter, clogged ducts, or a poorly performing fan. If the (relatively) warm air from your house isn't blowing over the coils, the condensation they normally create starts to freeze. Once they start to freeze, ...


3

If you are at set point, it sounds like it's working correctly. Many of the newer high end thermostats have the ability to program maximum number of cycles per hour or minimum time between cycles, etc. varies by Tstat. You have to get into "installer setup" which requires the installer manual for directions and codes. But bear in mind, if you ...


3

The disconnect burning up is a sign of loose or corroded terminals which create a high resistance at the connections. As the current drawn stays the same, this generates heat to the point where it overheats the contact and worsens over time. Part of the tune-up is to check and retighten all electrical connections. Especially the screwed in kind at the ...


2

Right off the bat, the one item that really sticks out is the partially melted fuse holder and disconnect box mounted on the wall. That should be fixed before doing anything with the AC unit. There could be bad connections in there that could cause inefficiencies in the AC unit. Replacing the AC compressor would be a mistake in a 16 year old unit. If you're ...


2

The disconnect is cheap and easily melts, check for a bad connections, start amps. I would recommend a 521 start kit and most likely a contactor. I have replaced a contactor and installed a start kit. The start kits are great one unit went from 133 start amps to 7 start amps. I have a video I showed my client, being an electrical engineer he was amazed. 12 ...


2

Originally, homes throughout northeast, north and mid west that were new enough to have central heat, used gravity furnaces located in the basement. With no blower to move the air, the common practice was to place vents next to exterior walls and windows to counter drafts and temperature differences. Once fan forced heat was available, the old gravity ...


2

Actually it is quite common to have multiple air return ducts, with both heating and air conditioning it can save 20-30% by making slight adjustments and changing the flows. I usually suggest dampers on both the supply and return trunk lines for each level for the maximum savings, summer with ac more flow to the upper floor(s) in the winter more flow to the ...


2

Yes, you can do that. Technically, you can have the condenser unit anywhere you want. You just need a pathway for the freon supply line and the electric lines. Ideally, the closer the air handler and condenser unit are, the better the cooling will be so that needs to be a factor. If you're moving everything around, you might want to consider getting the air ...


2

Each manufacturer has installation recommendations for their equipment, including distance, vertical height difference, size of line, etc. I’d follow their directions. 30’ does not seem unreasonable for total length, including distance plus height. See Trane’s installation guide starting on page 18-21. https://www.trane.com/content/dam/Trane/Commercial/...


2

While this should work, I'd be worried about losses, including 1/2 the heat going down to the slab instead of up to the floor. A simpler solution would be to insulate. If that involves ripping up the floor then it would probably not make sense. But you may be able to blow in insulation through the same holes where you are thinking of blowing in hot air, or ...


2

Ok if you know 100% it is the coil that is an easy repair. The refrigerant first needs to be recovered the old coil cut out and the new one installed. Coil cost 2 ton R22 ~300$ Plus recovery time and pumping the system down once the new coil is installed. Measure the amount of R22 returned to the system and add the difference for your ~4 lb total . The ...


2

Just add fire blocking above the air return and below the receptacle. Now they are separate spaces. Problem solved...


2

The air space is just that if the wires are within the air space in any way they need to be plenum rated power wiring even low voltage requires the plenum rating. the only way around this Is to enclose the wiring or isolate from the environmental air source OR use plenum rated cables. In your case if I understand it correctly the vent would be above the ...


2

Yup, it's that simple. Since the AC's off anyway (because the Trane blower burned out after 5 years) I figured I had little to lose by just hooking it up and checking to see if it powered the Thermostat as it should. It does.


2

There are combined CO/NG detectors, very cheap. The best NG detector is your nose. Your air filter will not filter either of these gases, they will pass through. If you have an electrostatic air filter it might set NG aflame .... that would certainly alert you to it. The stuff in your air filter could be grey, black, brown, white ... it really depends ...


1

Many homes have only one main return located at the air handler. The separate rooms have a supply but the return is the space/gap under the room door. While closing a room door might not affect cooling too much, a hallway door cutting off a number of bedrooms would have a major effect. Installing a through vent above the hallway door might be the answer. I ...


1

Creating compressed air is expensive If you consider most air handlers are pushing over 100 cubic feet of air a minute (many in the 200-300 rang). An air compressor 5 horse power will have a rating of 10-15 scfm at the working pressure so you would need a huge compressor just to move the air that would be expensive. Compared to the fractional HP motor on the ...


1

I'm thinking you'd be alright the way it is. An easy fix would be to go to your home store and find the rack where they have pieces of steel in various lengths and pick up a piece 1/8" by 1" by 36" or whatever size is appropriate for your unit. Attach it underneath that top corner lip and wedge it into the concrete by the bottom lip. The ...


1

A drip pan backing up is very common. Look for the drain, there is probably some growth of moss / mildew and dust growing in the drain. Don’t use vinegar to clean it vinegar will Dissolve the galvanized coating over multiple uses and is hard on the coils. The drain is usually on the outside edge and I always tilt the pan so that is the low point.


1

Having single returns on each floor is now the new (cheaper) normal.When I was still doing some residential heat & a/c it was imperative to have a return and a supply in each room. Today, in order to save money on the installation, most if not all of the of the multi-unit housing plans are opting for the single returns. This single return concept lowers ...


1

You never want the coils in the evaporator to ice up. Ice can damage the coils and reduces the airflow. More often I find dirty coils outside many times filled with dust so they are not cooling the refrigerant. A 5 degree delta sounds small but is meaningless without the air temp , with a system this old an 80 deg outside temp you should be closer to 15-20 ...


1

There ate many different types of pipes, tubes, and ducts that you could use, but there's also a furniture solution. just use a folding room divider folded into a box shape. Seal around the base with draught-excluder saussages. if needed seal the seems with gaffer tape If you're on an extreme budget you could use an empty refrigerator box.


1

The easiest way to deal with this common issue is a vent booster fan, such as this example. It would not take up wall space nor be unsightly. Without more information, such as the size of the vent opening or mains voltage, it would be impossible to be more specific. A photo of the room and a closeup of the vent might be helpful. Browse HVAC suppliers, ...


1

This is the same arrangement as in all 270 houses in my tract development in Dallas TX. It is the standard arrangement. There is some insulation on the inside of the sheetmetal panels. EDIT Given the new info that this is a heat pump it would be some benefit to put an insulated ceiling on the closet. Possibly the original heating was a gas fired furnace and ...


1

First of all, that "tech" doesn't know his @$$ from a hold in the ground. He fed you a bunch of BS to get a sale on a new system. He probably worked for one of those "we do a/c checks for $49!" Companies right? They arent technicians. 75percent of their training is on sales. They come come out, diddle fart around a unit, come in with a bunch of photos (...


1

If I recall correctly the only real test to determine potential remaining life of an compressor is a megohmmeter test. Basically a highly advanced resistance test of the compressor's motor windings. Most HVAC techs don't have megohmmeters. Most schools don't train techs how to use 'em. It requires having a baseline. In short: if the compressor runs my ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible