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This is mostly a matter of opinion. You'll usually get a better (more uniform) result if you do things edge-to-edge or corner-to-corner, including primer. The undercoat can have a significant effect on the sheen (and sometimes the color) of the topcoat. Another consideration is lighting. If the room has few windows and low lighting, the ceiling finish will ...


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I've bricked a few steel heat treating furnaces with asbestos bricks but never heard of asbestos mortar so I'd guess your safe there. It's crumbling a bit because it wasn't finished off correctly because it was in the attic. As far as the plaster, doesn't hurt to have it checked.


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You should have received an asbestos report when you purchased also lead paint. I have not seen asbestos in refractory cement or mortar , many times if needed the asbestos looked like thick white layers of cardboard, I see what looks like horse hair in the plaster, I have not found asbestos in horse hair plaster and lath but have heard that it was used so it ...


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The white wire tucked into the back of the box, that isn't stripped or capped, is your actual neutral. We know that "White 1" is not neutral, because it is spliced to a black wire, and a black wire can only be a hot wire (remarking hot-colored wires to change their purpose is forbidden). Therefore "White 1" is certainly a hot wire, and should have been ...


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Just chiming in here because I had this problem too and this was one of the only threads that I could find that discussed the issue. My problem was definitely the housing can shifting upwards and I was pushing the light into place. All I did was take two strips of electrical tape, stuck one end to the interior of the housing and ran it vertically down ...


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Candelabra is a type of lamp base (the screwey thing at the bottom). It is the second most common after Edison E27. They are widely supported and are readily available in LED at prices comparable to E27 (unlike less common sizes, where they come at a premium). You shouldn't have any trouble finding such bulbs at places that sell Harbor Breeze fans. If ...


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The installation instructions seem pretty clear. You should remove the three screws around the perimeter and then you may have to twist the shade portion to pull it down. The bump visible next to the screw could be an indentation that holds on to a notch in the shade that requires it to be twisted before it comes off. Maybe you just need to use a little ...


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You probably have a DC motor fan. The DC motor uses magnets so it has to align before starting this is why you see it moving back and forth before it starts. The DC motor also uses 70% less energy than a AC motor and will most likely last much longer too.


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Your cord penetration needs to either be grommeted, or use a proper cable clamp in a standard knockout hole. They sell junction box covers with standard knockout holes. Mechanically, what you did is fine as long as the projector weighs less than 4 pounds. If it weighs more, you need to properly tie into the fan support structure in the way that you might ...


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I suspect the reason you do not find a ceiling joist in the area where you want to hang the projector screen is because the joists are parallel to the direction that you want to hang the screen. There is a good way to deal with this situation without having to just depend upon 1/2" thick ceiling drywall to support your screen hangers. The ceiling drywall ...


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the Molly Hollow Metal Cavity Ceiling Spring Toggle Hook M4 x 60 mm you link is itself "rated" to hold 25 lbs... based on it being metal and an M4 diameter. It's the drywall that isn't going to hold up to a single molly like that even if it has the finger thing that opens up when behind the wall spreading the load over more area. if u can't make the ...


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While I do agree with all of the comments above. Yes, it must be addressed immediately. And yes, the foundation may very well be perfectly fine. However, obvious increasing size and door operation changes are absolutely not normal settling. It could be from bad framing --- Structure that was meant to sit on a stud or beam wasn't and was only held by nails. ...


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Using 2"x12" spaced at 16" or even 24" would eliminate any potential sag. The 2"x12" would then help support your rafters using the vertical 2x4's rather than having your rafters support your joists. My home is built using 2"x12" ceiling joists and all the joist joints are on a load bearing wall. This home is 20 years old and has zero sag in a 20' span. The ...


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It looks like the original ledger was doing its job - the floor joists were staying up with the doubled header. The Simpson hangers were not an appropriate application. The notched joists' ends made it impossible to place the hangers per the manufacture's specifications. I doubt that the hangers will compensate for the loss of the ledger. There will ...


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All those joist have to be replaced. Any joist requires inch an half bearing minimum. 3” for a beam. You got like 3/8” actually on the joist hanger and those do like there too small a hanger. When you have those joists off replace that cracked ply on the lintel. You’ll to put in a temp support wall as was mentioned earlier in this thread. What you have in ...


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If you want to run your rack/whatever in the other direction or in a specific location, you can screw 2x4s as needed flat against the ceiling and perpendicular to the red lines in MonkeyZeus' photo. Add a screw into every joist (green dots) (and there should be one right at the wall), and then you can screw your rack to those 2x4s (magenta oval). So you can ...


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