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4

You don't box around that unnecessary wall plate. You remove it--it's part of the wall you removed--then fill the drywall gap. If you lack drywall backing because the joists are parallel, simply float some scrap wood across the gap and screw it to the existing drywall.


3

If the removed wall wasn't structural, you should be able to remove the 2x4 and replace it with something thinner (like the same 2x4 run through a planer) to make it flush with the rest of the ceiling, then install a long, narrow piece of drywall to bring it flush with the existing ceiling. If the rest of the ceiling has 5/8" drywall (for strength ...


0

You have two good options. 1 - Either frame around it with full soffits with 2x2 and drywall on top, or wood to make it look like beams (usually would add a few more "beams" at regular intervals so it looks intentional. 2 - You can lower the drywall around it by removing the whole ceiling, add furring strips to lower the level to match the beam, ...


1

Does the plate have to be metal? We recently did just this, with a piece of 2x8 bracing two joists, and 4 lag screws into the joists. A 2x6 is also fine. The screws must be 3in long as they go through the plate, through the drywall, and then 1 inch into the joist. Any wiring through or around the joist should -by code- be 1.25in in from the edge. You can use ...


1

IF those were wooden beams (which seems doubtful) the cracks are of no concern. They are in the top part of the beam, thus in compression, not tension. Two of them are more in the joint between ceiling and "beam" than "beam" for that matter. If they are actually drywall over something (as suggested in a comment, pretty reasonably from the ...


0

I am a drywall finisher/taper. This might be a case of bad drywall finishing. The taper might not have prefilled the joint before taping, which leads to the tape blistering/bubbling. The straight line looks like there's definitely a joint there and the tape is coming apart because there is not enough mud behind it.


0

This is nothing but shoddy workmanship on a brand new home. Contact the builder and/or warranty company immediately and ask when they'll be out to fix it. Document. Document. Document! Do everything in writing - email at a minimum, certified letters if they get snippy with you. If they call to discuss it, take notes, then summarize the phone conversation ...


3

Lets eliminate the switch with the red wire. Remove the two black wires on the red wire switch, one from the screw terminal and one from the backstab and wire nut them together. Remove the red wire and put a wire nut on it. Now get a new single pole single throw, standard toggle switch since you stated both switches were cracked. Remove the black wire loop ...


1

I have a similar string of lights on my drywall ceiling. I used a Cable stapler to tack it up, putting a staple every 18 inches, you could go with less spacing if feel it is necessary. A cable stapler use special staples and is designed to cradle the cable/cord so that the staple does not shoot though the insulation and through the wire within. Of course ...


0

If you are putting screws into a ceiling they will eventually fail with even the most nominal weight on them. My son when he was little had a hot air balloon with a tail made of nylon that weighed 4-5 ounces. I figured, drywall screw will be fine. Well it was fine for about 9 months, then just fell. If I were you - and I run string lights too - I would ...


0

I have been seeing this a lot lately so I don't know if there is a new caulk on the market for drywall but in my experience the caulk will 'flash' under paint so it isn't going to give you a good finish and it will be noticeable. I would ask the worker what type of caulk it is and how it handles being painted.


2

Those joists carry dead/live loads of the closet floor, any walls resting on it and that transfer loads, foot of any attic stairs etc.. There is also a load transferring from the studs you mention via a bottom plate (not visible) onto the joists. If you remove the joists during work, you have to support the flooring and bottom plate that rests on the joists. ...


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