Hot answers tagged

42

You could install a circular ceiling medallion over the hole and run the light fixture through the middle of it. This would avoid having to match the paint of the surrounding ceiling. Or here's an even simpler, 10", white trim piece.


20

It's impossible to say with any confidence without knowing the details of your house's construction. If there is a regular room above (not an attic) the ceiling you want to hang the rings from, normally those ceiling joists above are also the floor joists of the room above. If it was constructed to modern guidelines those are going to be pretty strong - if ...


19

You've hit on three viable options. I'll make some notes on each so you can decide. Run a cleat across the gap Requires perhaps the most damage to the finished ceiling, but simple and fairly easy A 2x6 laid flat against the ceiling will carry the weight just fine (avoid boards with large knots) Four 3-1/2" by 3/8" lag screws, properly piloted into the ...


19

I vote for the solution of providing blocking in the attic but will suggest a technique which is very much easier to install than some of the other answers here. A side on looking picture will get the idea across quickly. First trip to the attic to access the situation should include making measurements for spacing between the ceiling joists and the ...


16

Like any other repair to sheetrock/plasterboard/drywall. Turn power off (the breaker, not the switch) to the fixture and drop the trim out of your way. Either cut out a larger area and make a large patch, or add some wood strips behind and fit a small patch, then fill the joints (force joint compound into them with a small drywall knife), tape, and mud (...


16

How tall are your ceilings? You're going to be putting huge stresses on the ceiling when you're swinging, even doing simple giants, to say nothing of any sort of move that has a "landing" - all that "jerk" you feel in your shoulders is being transmitted right up to the framing. As a former gymnastics dad, I've watched the rings rig as it ...


8

Is this ceiling fan going to fall? There is nothing in the photo that tells me a fall is about to happen, but the installation looks poor, and I think you need to get under that cover. Will it cut your head off? No, if the physical support let’s go, it will dangle by it’s wiring like a wounded buzzard, but probably give you time to get clear. A bonk with a ...


8

Removing this box is not a good solution when there are rigid conduits bringing wires into this existing box. The main reason for this is that those wires would still need to terminate into an accessible junction box. On top of that there is just no simple way to adapt the existing rigid conduits for connection to the floating connection box on a recessed ...


8

You need to stop destroying stuff right now. Since your project is this light, you are assuming the universe is gracious enough to have ALL the wires in these conduits be ONLY about this light. That is a faulty assumption. There could be other circuits you don't know about; your plans could break them. Now to start with, nobody uses conduit for their ...


8

The requirements for GFCI protection are in NEC 210.8(a): 210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel. Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel shall be provided as required in 210.8(A) through (E). The ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location. and (A) tells you that ...


7

That's an electrical junction box. Likely for a ceiling light, but could also be for a ceiling fan, smoke detector, or anything else mounted on the ceiling that needs power attached.


7

Just get a couple of joist hangers and add a 2x6 between your joists. Drill a small hole in the ceiling where you want the eye bolt first and poke a wire hanger through to help locate it from above.


7

Use GFCI switches You seem to be assuming that the only kind of GFCI available is a receptacle. They actually come in several other arrangements: GFCI + breaker GFCI + switch + 1-socket recep GFCI deadfront (no sockets) useful for certain compliance issues GFCI that is a switch The last one looks like a GFCI dead front, but the Test/Reset buttons are ...


7

I would verify your trusses have the capacity to add the additional weight of the strong ties and 2x4s on 16”. That is how I have done it on several buildings but I had the weight added in because I wanted clear span below. Your trusses look a bit lighter than mine were, but I can’t see much of them. But our span was similar.


6

It looks like there is more damage likely hidden under the plaster and the wood members there would be structural. You should remove the plaster to get to and repair this damage or verify that there is none. I suggest removing all the plaster of the relatively small area that is the ceiling of the bay window and replace with drywall after the repair work is ...


6

Before you make any structural changes to a building it would be very wise to hire a "structural engineer" to make sure that you do not reduce the integrity of the building. Just removing braces that may be there so you can change the internal space in any structure, move any walls or load bearing wall could be a costly mistake for the building and ...


5

Ceiling height: 8 feet (nominal; 92-5/8" stud length plus 4-1/2" of plates), 9 and 10 feet less common (108" and 120" studs); vaulted ceiling peaks as room size and slope dictate Wall thickness: interior, 3-1/2" (nominal 2x4) plus half-inch drywall on both sides; exterior, 5-1/2" (nominal 2x6) plus half-inch drywall inside, half inch sheathing outside, and ...


5

That is a 4" deep Octagon Box. It is a standard electrical junction box for mounting lights and other ceilingey things. (not a fan; that takes a reinforced box). Note the single Romex (NM-B) cable entering it. The person is applying a junction box extension ring. They're modestly expensive, especially since, as an obscure item, the big-box stores will ...


5

I would suggest that you install 1x4 furring strips (example not a recommendation) across the joists. Use the picture below as an example. Notes: 24" is too far apart to install 5/8" on a ceiling. It would sag over time especially in a garage where there are more humidity and heat changes. So even if they were dead on - still a bad ...


5

You can try an adaptor (universal crossbar) (adjustable swivel crossbar) Or just live with it as is?


5

Provided you do find joists and not mere ceiling laths, there are two main ways to provide extra strength. Have a sturdy cross-brace that connects to a number of joists, not just one. Have vertical supports either side of the rings. In effect, if you have both of these, you will be building a floor-to-ceiling door-frame with the rings in between. This ...


5

You'll need the 2x4s (oriented vertically, of course, as implied by the joist hangers you linked to) to span that distance and carry drywall.


4

It looks like it is on top of a wall so it is being used as a nailer. I believe that is why.


4

Is there an attic above that leaves the joists accessible? Add 2x6 blocking between the joists to get the support you need. Toenail the blocking to the joists on both sides of the blocking. Then you can fasten the faux beam to the blocking rather than the drywall.


4

Whether you use the torsion springs or friction clips depends entirely on the type of housing you're mounting the trim plate on. If the housing has a spring bracket in it like the picture below, you would use the torsion springs. If there is no spring bracket, only a few holes or slots for a straight spring, then you'd use the friction clips to secure the ...


4

This problem is most easily addressed by surface mount wireway. Rather than run exposed cables, you attach a fairly innocuous plastic or metal rectangular cross section wireway/duct/conduit that carries the cables across the ceiling and/or wall in a less obtrusive way than putting them out in the open, but which does not require major surgery to the building ...


4

Those are "Mollys": (hollow wall anchors) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molly_(fastener) They don't come out, the screw comes out (it's long so it comes out slowly), but the anchor part will stay. It might be possible to drill out the anchor part from the front Or maybe cut off the arms at the back, remove the nut fold up the stubs and eject the ...


4

No, you cannot remove the beam and install a collar tie as sketched in the picture. If the ridge beam was structural, then you might be able to remove it. I suspect the other jack stud that you removed was structural too and should be replaced. One collar tie for that size garage is not adequate. (Perhaps ties to every other roof joist (about 4’ oc) might ...


4

It is the access panel to the opening to access the attic space above your ceiling. It has a key lock that the Apt manager or maintenance staff has a key to.


4

Hardwired Lights I have some plug-in ceiling lights. I don't particularly like them! One of them I finally switched - original was plug-in, so I replaced with a plug-in. It died early (cheap junk, but I didn't realize it at the time), I returned it to Home Depot and put the money towards a hardwired light. Not a big deal to remove the receptacles and hard ...


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