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23

The white marks are joint compound (aka "drywall mud") - kind of like plaster. The stripes are where separate sheets of drywall are joined with tape and mud and the little splotches are where screw holes have been covered over with mud. Those actually are good places to install your storage rack because they indicate the locations of the lumber framing that ...


12

The cable with the white wire that's connected to the two black wires is a switch loop: Normally wires with white insulation are used only for neutrals, but code makes an exception to allow for use of the white wire in a cable used as a switch loop as a hot rather than a neutral. If you'll look closely in the drawing, the whites used as hots are wrapped ...


9

This is what an unpainted surface looks like. Those white marks are joint/drywall compound and under them are screws holding the drywall to the joists. The long white lines are the same thing except on a junction between two sheets of drywall. So there are screws and a seam under them. You can install a rack along the white marks but not directly in the ...


7

A good ol' scrap block of two-by does nicely. Just set your laser 1-1/2" above your slab height and kick the block around as you work. This doesn't work for ceilings, of course, but hopefully you have fewer points to measure in that case. You'd have to use something with a suction cup or magnet otherwise.


7

That's actually the way one normally does such things, and has been since before there were lasers, other than one normally uses a rod rather than a tape for more consistent results. You establish a reference plane (Generally not going to any great lengths to try and get it super-close to the surface you are working), measure in a grid, and mark high spots ...


7

That's an electrical junction box. Likely for a ceiling light, but could also be for a ceiling fan, smoke detector, or anything else mounted on the ceiling that needs power attached.


6

The fact that the white is with the blacks is very important. Most of what you need to know is in the positions of the existing wires; don't be in a hurry to tear it all apart, or you lose that critical info. Color-coding is not by wire function, it's how cables are made. That white has been reversed to be a hot. This is because it's in a switch loop, ...


6

All you accomplish by hanging small pieces and then taping all those joints is to add more fasteners and more lumps in your ceiling. The taped joints effectively make it all a single sheet, just as it would be if you hung larger sheets. Do a little math and you'll realize that each fastener already only holds up a small bit of drywall, on average. Adding ...


5

Ceiling height: 8 feet (nominal; 92-5/8" stud length plus 4-1/2" of plates), 9 and 10 feet less common (108" and 120" studs); vaulted ceiling peaks as room size and slope dictate Wall thickness: interior, 3-1/2" (nominal 2x4) plus half-inch drywall on both sides; exterior, 5-1/2" (nominal 2x6) plus half-inch drywall inside, half inch sheathing outside, and ...


5

That is a 4" deep Octagon Box. It is a standard electrical junction box for mounting lights and other ceilingey things. (not a fan; that takes a reinforced box). Note the single Romex (NM-B) cable entering it. The person is applying a junction box extension ring. They're modestly expensive, especially since, as an obscure item, the big-box stores will ...


4

With a helper, pull a builder's line (dryline) from one end to the other along a bottom corner of the beam. Find a good compromise that's just outside all the curves and humps. Fasten the line to the walls at each end and make sure it's very tight. Check that you can plumb up from the line at all points along the beam without encroaching on the beam. If not,...


4

Just a heads up, spanning 22' while being limited to 4-6" floor depth is extremely cost prohibitive. Deeper is always cheaper, but it sounds like you don't have the space to make this work as planned. What's below this storage space you want to create? Can you legally reduce the head height by framing the floor lower? This would allow for more storage space ...


4

The 1/2" bolts will hold up your truck, or thereabouts, so that's not an issue. I'd be concerned about the pullout strength of the deck screws (especially if your rack was particularly big or you have a fondness for cast iron). Upgrade to something a little bigger. I'd lean toward a 1/4" lag screw, 3" or so, assuming that fits the flange. If that doesn't ...


4

The 2 black + 1 white is your always-hot bundle. You won't use it (unless you want to power the fan 24x7 and use a remote on it). The 2 white is the neutral bundle. Your fan will need that. The loose black is the switched-hot from the switch. (it is the partner wire to the oddball white from above). This is the switched-hot for the fan. The switch ...


4

When attaching velcro, my thought process is - when the two items are separated, which one would it be more pleasing to have the fuzzy side or the scratchy side? Using velcro to mount a flashlight? Fuzzy side on the flashlight for sure because it's soft. Normally it ends up being scratchy side on the fixed surface and soft side on the portable piece. You ...


4

What you need is a ceiling medallion. That's a fancy name for "a circular thing you stick on the ceiling to look nice and cover a hole". A lot of them are designed to actually have a lamp hang from them, but there are some with a big hole in the middle which is exactly what you need here. There are simple ones: and fancier ones: Some are white or metallic ...


4

To me that looks like a water leak that is being pushed by the air flow. I would be checking for a leak above that location.


4

It looks like it is on top of a wall so it is being used as a nailer. I believe that is why.


3

This is the typical explanation given, and the diagram is normally of a fan on the ceiling and a couch sitting under the fan to represent the furniture and people in the room... In the summer, you want the fan to blow down and that blowing air will hit your skin and make you feel cool. It's not about air temperature in the summer, it's about air movement ...


3

Most likely, if you are certain it is NOT from moisture it can be the simple fact that it is some inexpensive painters caulk that was never painted. In a commercial settings ie. eateries, we use clear silicone. You could simply try painting it.


3

Without being able to see the clips, I’m still going to say to try placing the lip of the glass cover against two of the clips and then press against the opposite side of the cover: use the cover to press in the clips. You can then use your other hand to press in the remaining clip. You may actually find that one of the clips is fixed. In this case, use the ...


3

...ever seen lights that use this kind of box for hanging? No, because that box is not made for directly attaching anything to it. The box needs an adapter ring attached to hang a standard fixture (or to mount switches, receptacles, etc.) By itself that is just a junction box called a "4-S" (for 4" square). Look for a 4-S to 4-O plaster ring. It goes ...


3

Yes, but you won’t like it... Had this before, and you have to remove the old paint back to a secure, stable layer. Think yourself lucky - we had to do it on the ceiling of a paper mill.. hundreds of square metres...


3

You need a conduit. For that matter you would need a conduit if running them inside the ceiling space.


3

It's a water stain, either from a leak as Ed stated or condensation. Check the ductwork for leaks. Once you have fixed the problem, brush on two coats of stain blocker, prime and then paint. Whether you have to paint the entire ceiling will depend on how well you can match the paint.


3

The white wire tucked into the back of the box, that isn't stripped or capped, is your actual neutral. We know that "White 1" is not neutral, because it is spliced to a black wire, and a black wire can only be a hot wire (remarking hot-colored wires to change their purpose is forbidden). Therefore "White 1" is certainly a hot wire, and should have been ...


3

This is mostly a matter of opinion. You'll usually get a better (more uniform) result if you do things edge-to-edge or corner-to-corner, including primer. The undercoat can have a significant effect on the sheen (and sometimes the color) of the topcoat. Another consideration is lighting. If the room has few windows and low lighting, the ceiling finish will ...


3

I’d read Architectural Graphic Standards. It has standard terms, dimensions, materials, etc. used in the design and construction industry for parking lots, wall construction, roofing, flashing, stairs, fireplaces, plumbing, heating, electrical, etc. This book has been published for over a hundred years, so be sure to buy a new publication not an older ...


2

Do not cut the rebar in the concrete ceiling slab. Rebar is placed in concrete slabs (and beams) for tension. Cutting the rebar eliminates the resistance to tensile stress and could cause immediate failure (collapse of the slab).


2

For your new shed I would have built 2x6 stud walls @ 16''oc and the same for the roof joists. In Ontario, you will need 6'' walls to get a minimum of insulation. You can always fur out to get more depth for insulation if you have already built the walls but that won't change the strength of your walls. I'm not sure what the snow and wind loads are in your ...


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