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19

Spackle might work, however it is specially designed for repairing holes and cracks and is more expensive than the product that is normally used for doing a skim coat: regular joint compound or topping compound. You should do a bit of research and plan to practice with wide trowels/mud knives if you intend to do this yourself. Hanging the drywall is not the ...


10

Wow, the picture you happened to take illustrates perfectly why those metal clips are installed. The metal clips are used to keep the truss independent from the non-bearing wall. That is to say, the roof trusses are designed so the wall does NOT put pressure on the bottom chord of the trusses, but help maintain the wall in its proper position. The way it’s ...


8

It's a bog-standard plastic box, attached to a metal bracket. Drill out the rivets holding the box to its bracket, or just cut the thing into bits.


7

I just completed a similar project. I skim coated my bathroom walls with joint compound to cover up a paint job from a previous tenant that had resulted in crackling and flaking over the entire surface of the drywall. You can read a bit about the difference between drywall joint compound (mud) and spackle here, but there a few chief differences in ...


7

You could attach blocking to the joists on both sides of the existing electrical box and bracing, etc. By attaching the blocking vertically, you will maximize the weight capacity, but by attaching horizontally you can provide a larger area to "hit" with the mounting hardware. Both orientations should support the weight adequately. Sections of 2x4 ...


6

After fixing the leak, you might want to try bleach. I had luck with 25 percent bleach in water. I put a sponge, saturated with the solution, in a plastic tray and pressed it up onto the ceiling. The stain returned in a few months and so I did it again...it is now gone. You could try a small test area to see if it will work. Bleach is nasty stuff. Take ...


6

Barring very unusual circumstances, they are more likely to shrink from the "as installed" state than expand from it. If they do expand, the small and sloped contact area works in your favor.


6

It is an access hatch. To determine why it's there requires that you either open it and look, or know what is above it. For example if there is a bath tub upstairs this could be for access to service it. There could be an electrical junction box in it. There could be nothing there. Perhaps there was a light fixture or another air vent that was removed ...


6

I agree that the only issue here is an aesthetic one. If the joists were going to settle, they would have. I'd take a BFH (big freaking hammer) and smash the descending hangers up tight, then replace the drywall. I'd cut a slightly oversized patch, trace it on the ceiling, then cut that out. Presto. Perfect fit. The only place you really should float backing ...


5

It is a "design trend" driven by several things boiling down to $$$$ In general ceiling heights in the 1800's were pretty high across the globe, 3.5 meters in Europe was not uncommon. Remember that "nice" single family homes back then were not common among the peasants, the upper class people wanted high ceilings because of several ...


5

Based on the picture that was posted in a comment (then added to the original question). It looks like this was a poorly done patch. At some point in the past, someone had to remove a portion of the ceiling drywall. Possibly to repair a leaking pipe, to repair a water leak from outside, or some other reason. When the person (a lazy contractor, or a previous ...


4

What you have there is metal conduit. You can tell because it's modern construction but no ground wires. The metal pipe is the conduit. It's common with conduit for other, unrelated wires to "pass through" your box. There's nothing you can do about that except understand not every wire up there is related to your project. Deciphering the wire ...


4

You should not mount anything to the beam (A) by drilling in to it. Under load the bottom is under tension and the width of the hole reduces how much the beam can manage. Think of it as cutting a strand in a rope. Theoretically you could saddle the beam with a strap, rope, chain, and cut out a section of sheet rock to allow for play, or have a brace made to ...


4

Well, here it is two years later and I did it. There is now both a bathroom and bedroom where the "vaulted ceiling" used to be. To do the project required adding two additional lally columns in the basement. The floor was constructed by sistering two LVL beams to existing structural LVLs on either side of the space. Then joists were hung between ...


4

To close this out, I had a friendly, professional, licensed plumber come out and make the change and it set me back all of $110 + a $20 tip. In retrospect, there was no reason to be concerned about cost and every reason to pay a professional. Sharing this in case it's helpful for someone else facing a similar situation. Editing to add details: The plumber ...


4

Replace "Pipe" with "Conduit" and "Fiberglass insulation" with "duct seal" (note: the electrical conduit kind, not the air duct kind) and put a couple of bell-end fittings on the ends to make it nice (Or just ream the sharp corners off the inside of the cut ends really well to be inexpensive) and you have a normal ...


4

You don't box around that unnecessary wall plate. You remove it--it's part of the wall you removed--then fill the drywall gap. If you lack drywall backing because the joists are parallel, simply float some scrap wood across the gap and screw it to the existing drywall.


4

Below is the answer... But to fix this properly you have to take down that piece of drywall and give us pictures. Whatever is behind there is the issue. You short-cutted this install and left yourself with way more work than it should be. You have not installed proper backing for this piece or adjoining pieces. Now you want short-cuts for your short-...


4

It's illegal to use this type of fixture. Electrical codes worldwide have standards for safety of appliances. The "cheap Cheese" crud found on AliExpress does not even attempt to meet any of them. As such, it is likely to start a fire, emit toxic smoke when it does catch fire, and do the things which are the reason why there is an Underwriter's ...


4

Hard to say, but possibly dust spun off by the ceiling fan. Or stirred around in the room and then spun to the wall. It's the same effect as mud spinning off a bike or car wheel, called the "centripetal force". Looks like the horizontal stripe is at the same height as the fan's blade peeking through in the picture. But it could also be the drywall ...


4

Update after seeing the fixture image: There's no need to bolt the box to the support framing other than to secure it in position. Nothing hangs from the box (so it doesn't even need to be fan-rated). I would still run the 2x10 over the box, and I'd add blocking on each side of the box to bring it down flush with the adjacent joists. This will give you solid ...


4

I'm not an expert on this but that ceiling looks pretty bad. Your big mistake was getting a painter to repair the ceiling and not a plasterer. Painters can patch but doing an entire ceiling takes a special skill set. You can try sanding the living hell out of it to smooth it out or get someone who specialized in plastering.


4

As discussed in the comments, cove lighting is one alternative that lights the whole room from the edges instead of the center and without having a hanging chandelier (easily blocked if the ceiling is relatively low) and without using ordinary recessed lighting. I easily found a tutorial from Family Handyman which covers a lot of the issues involved. The ...


3

You would do far better to put your access horizontally from the second floor of the house into the space above the garage. I honestly figured with so many double beams stretching across the garage, Cutting a single one couldn't possibly have any effect on the overall structure If they were not needed for the design, they would not be there.


3

You can also look at using removable paint. This answer might be a little late, but I had a similar issue where I wanted to paint my ceilings white, but was looking for a non-permanent solution because the ceilings were wood and the landlord did not want them painted. I eventually stumbled across tempera paint powder for kid's art, it comes in these big ...


3

Nails popping up above the surface is a common event and usually isn't cause for alarm. The reason this occurs is from slight movement of the framing members (due to expansion and contraction) that over time works the nail loose. Conversely, if the pops and cracks have appeared in a relatively short period of time, it may be time to search more closely for a ...


3

I already accepted an answer for this, but I thought I'd post back because what I've learned since may be of help or interest to others. After cleaning up the damaged coving and chipping off the wall plaster, it seemed more apparent (as some commenters suggested) that this coving was made in situ. In fact, it seems as though the plaster of the coving was the ...


3

Using spackle to smooth the texture will be more expensive than using joint compound. Both will set hard and have about the same working and setting time. The problem with trying to smooth an already textured ceiling will take a lot of work and depends on the how course or textured it is now. It can be accomplished by a diligent DIY-er and the correct tools. ...


3

Lets eliminate the switch with the red wire. Remove the two black wires on the red wire switch, one from the screw terminal and one from the backstab and wire nut them together. Remove the red wire and put a wire nut on it. Now get a new single pole single throw, standard toggle switch since you stated both switches were cracked. Remove the black wire loop ...


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